: Good wintertime reads???



I~LUV~Caddys8792
11-27-06, 06:36 PM
Winter is just finally rolling into the upper midwest now, and I'm looking for a new book to read to get me thru the long bitterly cold nordic winter. The last few books I've read were Steven Kings..."Christine", "The Shining" and "The Stand" (The Stand took me about 6 months to get thru lol) all great books and I like his style of writing. Anyone else a big King fan? I'm thinking maybe I'll start reading "It" pretty soon. I heard that's pretty good. Otherwise I've got Tom Clancy's "Rainbow Six" around, and I've never finished that book.
What would you recommend?

pimpin88
11-27-06, 06:49 PM
Any of Dan Browns books. I've read Deception Point, Angels and Demons, and Da Vinci Code. I enjoyed all of them a lot!

gothicaleigh
11-27-06, 06:55 PM
I always recommend Bernard Cornwell.

Pick up his Warlord Chronicles trilogy (The Winter King, Enemy of God, and Excalibur) for a version of the Arthurian legends retold as historically as possible. Arthur is a warlord, Merlin a druid, and everything doesn't go quite the way the tales are traditionally told. Cauldron quests, invading saxons, and warring religions.

I'm two books into the Saxon Stories (The Last Kingdom and The Pale Horseman), his new trilogy set 300 years after the period of the Winter King (the third, Lords of the North, comes out in January). Definately worth picking up also if you find you like the Warlord Chronicles.



I've just finished Neil Gaiman's Fragile Things, an excellent collection of his short stories. Gaiman is easily the best fantasy writer alive today. The last story in the set is a novella follow-up to another of his great books, American Gods (about how the old gods wage war upon the new gods of technology).

90Brougham350
11-27-06, 06:56 PM
Sofie's World is a great page turner and it shows you a little about philosophy.

I read Isaac Asimov more than anything, if you're interested in psychology or "future" historical fiction, there's about 20 books that cover about 20 thousand years of possible future, from the developement of robots, the settling of the first few planets beyond earth, and the fall of the empire. So much of Star Wars is based on these books it's not even funny.

"The Lost Regiment" is a great series about a Civil war regiment that gets thrown to another planet where different groups of people from all civilizations and time periods live. They've all been warped to this planet, where a race of aliens runs the show. Needless to say, this regiment isn't about to let the aliens take 1 of every 10 people in payment, so they have to work with their neighbors (16th centure Russians and 2nd century BC Carthaginians) to unite and fight.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
11-27-06, 07:27 PM
I think I'm gonna get either "It", "Carrie" or "Salem's Lot" next. But I gotta finish this book I just bought yesterday "The Rough Guide To Pink Floyd". It covers the band's history, the member's lives, the albums, the songs, other resources, etc etc.

gothicaleigh
11-27-06, 07:33 PM
I think I'm gonna get either "It", "Carrie" or "Salem's Lot" next. But I gotta finish this book I just bought yesterday "The Rough Guide To Pink Floyd". It covers the band's history, the member's lives, the albums, the songs, other resources, etc etc.

Have you read King's Dark Tower series? Good stuff there.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
11-27-06, 07:35 PM
Not yet. I've been concentrating on his earlier stuff, many believe that to be his best..

CadillacGurl
11-27-06, 09:48 PM
Tom Clancy has some good books, like you one you stopped in the middle of. Check Barnes and Noble and read some of the reviews. May help peak your interest.

c5 rv
11-27-06, 10:07 PM
A good series is Harry Turtledove's Timeline 191 series which is an alternate history of successive wars between the American states (and involvement in WWI & WWII) after the Confederacy wins the first civil war. A sort-of prequel, "Guns of the South" kicked it off, with time travelers providing advanced weapons to the South. The actual series is a straight alternate history without any SF / fantasy component.

Turtledove's style in the series is short chapters with about 15+ separate storylines with characters on both sides. In the later books, second generations of characters take over or new central characters & storylines are introduced - always staying at around 15 storylines.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline-191

I~LUV~Caddys8792
11-27-06, 10:53 PM
Tom Clancy has some good books, like you one you stopped in the middle of. Check Barnes and Noble and read some of the reviews. May help peak your interest.


I like Clancy, he writes books on manly stuff, but it's so hard to read because it's soooo technical and very very in depth.

xxpinballxx
11-27-06, 11:18 PM
Luv you seem to be a detail oriented kind of guy....
I would suggest anything by Micheal Critchon.
Gets into the details of things.....airframe is a good one by him.
also has one called Electronic Life I have been wanting to read.
Hes the one who wrote jurrasic park,

I~LUV~Caddys8792
11-27-06, 11:18 PM
Hmmm, sounds interesting, I'll have to check it out!

xxpinballxx
11-27-06, 11:26 PM
he really gets into the details of what hes describing. I know alot of people think its over kill and too much info on the technical side but I like that.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
11-27-06, 11:38 PM
I'm looking at "Andromeda Strain" right now on amazon.com, it looks very interesting, but it looks a bit like King's "The Stand". Well, except for the good v. evil part in The Stand.

xxpinballxx
11-27-06, 11:47 PM
thats another good one by him.....try that one.....you'll like it.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
11-27-06, 11:47 PM
Will do!

xxpinballxx
11-27-06, 11:52 PM
have to let me know what you think....

gdwriter
11-28-06, 12:07 AM
I like Clancy, he writes books on manly stuff, but it's so hard to read because it's soooo technical and very very in depth.

I got bored with Clancy. After a while, all of his books seemed to be the same. If you're interested in espionage and political intrigue, I'd recommend David Baldacci. I've read several and enjoyed them all.

I'll second xxpinballxx; I've read Michael Critchon's Airframe; good mystery. Since I know you like airplanes, that would be a good choice.

Lady Danielle
11-28-06, 05:05 AM
I love Mitch Alboum..he wrote Tuesdays with Morrie...its called For One More Day. Its about Baseball a washup his dead mother as a ghost and much more. Its a good quick book! I enjoyed it.

EcSTSatic
11-28-06, 07:52 AM
This may sound corny but have you thought of any of the old classics? There are many. I recently read Ben Hur, Ivanhoe, The 3 Musketeers, Utopia and Frankenstein. It's interesting to see how much of the original stories are captured in the movies.

excellent classic authors are
Alexander Dumas - Three Musketeers, Count of Monte Cristo
J.R.R. Tolkien - Lord of the Rings, Hobbit, Silmarilion
Sir Walter Scott - Ivanhoe, Rob Roy
Victor Hugo - Les Miserables
C.S. Lewis - Space Trilogy, Narnia series
Sun Tzu - The Art of War
T.E. Lawrence (Lawrence of Arabia) - Seven Pillars of Wisdom
Patrick O'Brian - The Aubry/Maturin series including Master and Commander. You really have to like classic sailing to appreciate this series. I've read almost 20 of them.

dp102288
11-28-06, 09:00 AM
Playboy?! :D

j/k. When I actually want to read, I go to Wikipedia and jsut browse around...I actually learn stuff!

Florian
11-28-06, 09:41 AM
Dean Koontz, Clive Cussler any Ray Bradbury.


F

xxpinballxx
11-28-06, 09:43 AM
patricia cromwell is also good reading there luv....

gothicaleigh
11-28-06, 10:12 AM
patricia cromwell is also good reading there luv....

Cornwell.

I've heard that, but don't believe I have ever read anything by her. What's a good book to start on?
Also always wondered if she were related to Bernard in any way...

xxpinballxx
11-28-06, 10:19 AM
thanks goth I knew it was wrong but couldn't think of the exact name.
POstmortem, body farm, predator is a good one. theres alot she wrote.

I would start with postmortem a few of hers are interlinked.
if you like CSI or crossing jordan you'll like these.

gdwriter
11-28-06, 01:01 PM
Dean Koontz, Clive Cussler any Ray Bradbury.

I'll second the Clive Cussler. The adventures are outrageous, and not particularly believable, but they're a fun read. I'm not sure which book it is, but one of them has a car chase with a Cord L-29 on a ski slope.

Stoneage_Caddy
11-28-06, 09:32 PM
"Comeback"
Fall and Rise of the American Auto Industry
by Ingrassia and white ....books about 10 years old ....managed to geta copy a few months ago ....for car guys its a real good look at what goes on ...

I~LUV~Caddys8792
11-28-06, 09:48 PM
Oooo I forgot about these. I've always wanted to read a biography on Howard Hughes..I've always been fascinated with him, and I saw a biography on Iacocca a long time ago, that would be cool to read too.

dp102288
11-29-06, 09:16 AM
Oh, I forgot I have a complete catalog on the Cadillac company and cars from 1905-2005 or something like that. Has every car ever made, production numbers, stats, etc...

Very informative, and I actually like to read that!

I~LUV~Caddys8792
12-02-06, 06:02 PM
I have that same book, except mine goes to 2000. I gotta get the new edition.


Anyways, back to the original topic. Last night I bought Steven King's "IT". Read 40 pages last night...I like it a lot so far!

P-Funk
12-04-06, 10:47 AM
excellent classic authors are
Alexander Dumas - Three Musketeers, Count of Monte Cristo
J.R.R. Tolkien - Lord of the Rings, Hobbit, Silmarilion
C.S. Lewis - Space Trilogy, Narnia series


Good choices.

If you like classics, you should also consider:
Bram Stoker - Dracula
Tolstoy - War and Peace (very long but good)
Dostoevsky - The Brothers Karamazov
Dickens - Great Expectations, A Tale of Two Cities
Carroll - Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, Through the Looking Glass (and What Alice Found There)

JimHare
12-04-06, 11:09 AM
When I actually want to read, I go to Wikipedia and jsut browse around...I actually learn stuff!

Not to burst your bubble, but considering some of the stuff I've seen on WikiPedia, I wouldn't advertise "learning" as one of the benefits....

Wiki has about as much actual educational veracity as your local SuperFresh grocery store bulletin board.

But I applaud your intent, none the less.

Here's an interesting site: http://www.straightdope.com/index.html

dp102288
12-05-06, 08:56 AM
^^ Yeah I know about the flaws of Wikipedia, but my thing is that Wikipedia covers subject that a normal encyclopedia or most books wouldn't. For example:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadillac_Eldorado

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_GM_platforms

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_GM_transmissions


Some stuff is horrible. But I just did a 17 page essay on Iraq using only Wikipedia. I always check the history of an article to make sure it isn't currently vandalised.