: With Age Comes Wisdom?



RobertCTS
10-25-06, 02:59 PM
I was in a conversation where we were discussing wisdom. It appeared to me that each day we all learn something, no matter how small or trite. When you look at a newly graduated college student you see intelligence but not necessarily Wisdom. The same man 40 years latter should be a wiser man. In the oriental cultures the elderly are highly respected by those younger and are often sought after for advice.

I had a young man laugh at me recently when I told him I was a wiser man than he.

Webster says Wisdom is:
The accumulated philosophic or scientific learning and the ability to discern inner qualities and relationships, good insight & good sense and good judgementwith generally accepted beliefs, a wise attitude, belief, or courses of action.

A nice philosophic conversation. Any interests or thoughts to share?
I now when I was younger I knew everything and much more than my old man. Over the years I've changed my mind. Dust off the cobwebs in your brain and talk to us.:yup:

TagApl4
10-25-06, 03:16 PM
I agree that everyday u learn a lil something be it a tidbit of knowlege, or how to act/react to a situation. But at the same time we are continuously forgetting things; things we think are trivial, concepts we have not used since gradeschool. What is the ultimate determinant of wisdom is how much you retain IMO.

*coming from a 22 year old who just earlier was asking someone 3 times my age what to do in a situation on the forum. good timing*

P-Funk
10-25-06, 03:46 PM
I guess I kind of agree with you. You gain wisdom as you age and wisdom and intelligence are different all together. However, a 30 year old may be wiser than a 50 year old but the 30 year old will be wiser when he is 50 than when he was 30.

Slywun
10-25-06, 03:46 PM
In the oriental cultures the elderly are highly respected by those younger and are often sought after for advice.


Which is why I'm moving when I retire....LOL


I think that a person becomes wiser as they gain experiences (good/bad/indifferent), and theorectically the older they are, the more experiences that gain.

That said, a 60 year old man with a handful of experiences, is not automatically wiser that a 20 year old with dozens of experiences.

TagApl4
10-25-06, 04:17 PM
This is a bit of a tangent but, They say in the development of the brain the sense of reason is last to develop in children, doesnt really start happening till early adolescence. On top of that very little is known of the brain and its functioning, the neuron kinetic interactions, neurological development, what is controlled by the regions of our brain that we dont even use, much is still to be discovered. So, as we age what changes in our brain chemically, and in its development, as other parts shut down that causes such a change in us. I dont even know what I'm asking here but im saying, the brain and knowledge is just a conundrum.

RobertCTS
10-25-06, 04:37 PM
I guess I kind of agree with you. You gain wisdom as you age and wisdom and intelligence are different all together. However, a 30 year old may be wiser than a 50 year old but the 30 year old will be wiser when he is 50 than when he was 30.

I think that is possible Funk. Someone who lives in a confined surrounding may experience very little and learn very little. So exposure is an important part of wisdom.:)

Elvis
10-25-06, 05:08 PM
Last month I fired somebody with 19 years experience--as soon as I found out what he really had was ONE year of experience NINETEEN TIMES.

It depends on the situation. If it's about reading people, understanding how to get along with them--it's usually age that wins out. Younger people tend to project their own emotions and feelings on the people they're dealing with.

You eventually learn that most people will NOT react and feel the same way you would in a given situation. Many times it's just the opposite.

Wisdom is having sense enough to admit to what you DON'T know.

90Brougham350
10-25-06, 06:51 PM
Aristotle believed that men gained wisdom once they were 45 or 50 years old, old enough to have seen children grow up, wars to have been won and lost, and old enough to have experienced most of what those younger were seeking wisdom on.

CVP33
10-25-06, 07:30 PM
Elvis hit the nail on the head. 19 years exp. example. I have to find ways to motivate of workforce of 5,000 associates from 16 to 60 years old and everyone's completely different. I find that as I grow older I take myself less serious and others moreso.

Someone quoted these before and I love them! If this isn't wisdom I don't know what is:

"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power."

"And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years."

Abraham Lincoln

RobertCTS
10-26-06, 05:19 AM
Interesting comments and insights. I had not thought it through but often one can have negative experiences that take them in the wrong direction. Do you call that wisdom even though it's negative or bad? After all some criminals are very wise and intelligent.

JimHare
10-26-06, 07:07 AM
It was the poet Tennyson who wrote "knowledge comes, but wisdom lingers."

Wisdom is the ability to apply prior knowledge and experience to a situation, and develop a thoughful, reasoned and flexible response.

Wise men change their minds often, fools never.

"Moonlight does funny things, that's what the wise men say.
"But when you're in love, your moon shines every day."
-Lenny and the Squigtones

dp102288
10-26-06, 09:28 AM
I can see the difference between knowledge and wisdom from these posts.

And I agree with them all. Wisdom is not something you acquire like knowledge. Knowledge is gained from a specific learning process, school, skills.

Wisdom is the application of knowledge to experience. I may know that my car can do 95+ in the rain. But my experience says that is unsafe. So it is wise not to do that.

RobertCTS
10-26-06, 11:57 AM
It was the poet Tennyson who wrote "knowledge comes, but wisdom lingers."

Wisdom is the ability to apply prior knowledge and experience to a situation, and develop a thoughful, reasoned and flexible response.

Wise men change their minds often, fools never.

"Moonlight does funny things, that's what the wise men say.
"But when you're in love, your moon shines every day."
-Lenny and the Squigtones

Wow Jim, excellent post!
I really liked this thought: "Wise men change their minds often, fools never."

AznPrydeRegalRyde
10-26-06, 09:38 PM
When I was teen I spent summers in Japan, worked with my grandfather, and this man was a genius. He had a tested IQ of 175 or something close. But he was also incredibly experienced and well spoken and thoughtful.
I remember 1 carved wooden plank he had above his workshop door, and translated it basically said "the true wisdom in life consists of the elimination of anything thats not essential". I use to think about this very literally, and never really payed attention to it.
I forgot about it, until 2 sumemrs ago when he died, and the family had this plank displayed at his wake. I ended up going for a long walk with my grandmother that day as she told old stories and we joked and luaghed about his life and the different stories we've all heard. It was then I realized what the plank meant and why this man was really a genius, and had true wisdom. It wasnt the amount of knowledge he had gained. Or his personnal weallth that implied greatness. It was how he made people feel and think. He had managed to treat every single person around him like they had something important to say, to offer to the world. He had managed to leave my grandmother smiling at his funeral! She said something to me on the walk that really opened my eyes. I had asked her how she was taking this so well and she said to me "Its because I dont feel he has left us like others have. Everywhere I look, I see him. Talking to you, I hear some of wisdom he tried to impart. I see him in you. I see your mother and see the man she married and the son and daughter they produced. I realize that non of this had anything to do with factual information, or wealth. It was purely his love, his respect, his ability to make everything seem ok and everyone seem worthwhile." And maybe that is true wisdom, maybe its how we make others feel, how we carry some of their burden when they need help, or a pat on the back when theyve done well. Maybe its how many people say great things about you when youre gone, I dunno... But the last thing he said to me in person was to be a good man. Good men never search for anything, never need anything, because everything theyve done and said to others comes back to them many times over.

Sorry for the novel...

RobertCTS
10-27-06, 05:05 AM
When I was teen I spent summers in Japan, worked with my grandfather, and this man was a genius. He had a tested IQ of 175 or something close. But he was also incredibly experienced and well spoken and thoughtful.
I remember 1 carved wooden plank he had above his workshop door, and translated it basically said "the true wisdom in life consists of the elimination of anything thats not essential". I use to think about this very literally, and never really payed attention to it.
I forgot about it, until 2 sumemrs ago when he died, and the family had this plank displayed at his wake. I ended up going for a long walk with my grandmother that day as she told old stories and we joked and luaghed about his life and the different stories we've all heard. It was then I realized what the plank meant and why this man was really a genius, and had true wisdom. It wasnt the amount of knowledge he had gained. Or his personnal weallth that implied greatness. It was how he made people feel and think. He had managed to treat every single person around him like they had something important to say, to offer to the world. He had managed to leave my grandmother smiling at his funeral! She said something to me on the walk that really opened my eyes. I had asked her how she was taking this so well and she said to me "Its because I dont feel he has left us like others have. Everywhere I look, I see him. Talking to you, I hear some of wisdom he tried to impart. I see him in you. I see your mother and see the man she married and the son and daughter they produced. I realize that non of this had anything to do with factual information, or wealth. It was purely his love, his respect, his ability to make everything seem ok and everyone seem worthwhile." And maybe that is true wisdom, maybe its how we make others feel, how we carry some of their burden when they need help, or a pat on the back when theyve done well. Maybe its how many people say great things about you when youre gone, I dunno... But the last thing he said to me in person was to be a good man. Good men never search for anything, never need anything, because everything theyve done and said to others comes back to them many times over.

Sorry for the novel...

Damn Regal, next time you write a novel please double space the lines! Thats hard to read. I persisted to the end because it was good material. Is it just me but it seems the oriental seek wisdom the most. First thing that come to mind are the Budist Munks. Thanks for sharing.:yup:

CIWS
10-27-06, 07:41 AM
Knowledge is of this creation / reality, Wisdom springs from the Divine. Knowledge lives in the head, Wisdom comes from the heart.

EcSTSatic
10-27-06, 08:30 AM
I'm proud of this group. You folks are good!:worship:

Knowledge speaks, but wisdom listens.
Jimi Hendrix

RobertCTS
10-27-06, 08:45 AM
I'm proud of this group. You folks are good!:worship:

Knowledge speaks, but wisdom listens.
Jimi Hendrix


Who woulda thunk we had intelligent life forms in the lounge?:D

Jimi Hendrix didn't say that, did he?

CIWS
10-27-06, 09:11 AM
"The fool chatters, while the wise man listens." -Chiun (from the movie, Remo Williams, The Adventure Begins)

Elvis
10-27-06, 09:16 AM
When I was teen I spent summers in Japan, worked with my grandfather, and this man was a genius. He had a tested IQ of 175 or something close. But he was also incredibly experienced and well spoken and thoughtful.
I remember 1 carved wooden plank he had above his workshop door, and translated it basically said "the true wisdom in life consists of the elimination of anything thats not essential". I use to think about this very literally, and never really payed attention to it.
I forgot about it, until 2 sumemrs ago when he died, and the family had this plank displayed at his wake. I ended up going for a long walk with my grandmother that day as she told old stories and we joked and luaghed about his life and the different stories we've all heard. It was then I realized what the plank meant and why this man was really a genius, and had true wisdom. It wasnt the amount of knowledge he had gained. Or his personnal weallth that implied greatness. It was how he made people feel and think. He had managed to treat every single person around him like they had something important to say, to offer to the world. He had managed to leave my grandmother smiling at his funeral! She said something to me on the walk that really opened my eyes. I had asked her how she was taking this so well and she said to me "Its because I dont feel he has left us like others have. Everywhere I look, I see him. Talking to you, I hear some of wisdom he tried to impart. I see him in you. I see your mother and see the man she married and the son and daughter they produced. I realize that non of this had anything to do with factual information, or wealth. It was purely his love, his respect, his ability to make everything seem ok and everyone seem worthwhile." And maybe that is true wisdom, maybe its how we make others feel, how we carry some of their burden when they need help, or a pat on the back when theyve done well. Maybe its how many people say great things about you when youre gone, I dunno... But the last thing he said to me in person was to be a good man. Good men never search for anything, never need anything, because everything theyve done and said to others comes back to them many times over.

Sorry for the novel...

That's the best post anyone's made in the history of this forum.

RobertCTS
10-27-06, 09:16 AM
"The fool chatters, while the wise man listens." -Chiun (from the movie, Remo Williams, The Adventure Begins)

Very good Grasshopper.:)

EcSTSatic
10-27-06, 09:41 AM
Who woulda thunk we had intelligent life forms in the lounge?:D

Jimi Hendrix didn't say that, did he?

Jimi (http://en.thinkexist.com/quotation/knowledge_speaks-but_wisdom_listens/209999.html) was quite the poet.

CIWS
10-27-06, 09:44 AM
Also quite the bad azzzzz guitar player in his day. If you ever get a chance to watch the DVD set , The History of Rock and Roll it really puts him in perspective with the other Rock guitarists at the time. He was AMAZING !! :worship:

EcSTSatic
10-27-06, 09:52 AM
"The fool chatters, while the wise man listens." -Chiun (from the movie, Remo Williams, The Adventure Begins)


I need to watch that movie again. I love those lines.

RobertCTS
10-27-06, 11:09 AM
Jimi (http://en.thinkexist.com/quotation/knowledge_speaks-but_wisdom_listens/209999.html) was quite the poet.

Very Talented and innovative guitar player. I can't even play the Kazoo.

"Their performance of 'Wild Thing' at the Monterey International Pop Festival in June 1967, in which Hendrix played the guitar with his teeth, confirmed their success in the US. The Jimi Hendrix Experience became one of the most popular and successful touring acts in the world."

CIWS
10-27-06, 11:43 AM
"Their performance of 'Wild Thing' at the Monterey International Pop Festival in June 1967, in which Hendrix played the guitar with his teeth, confirmed their success in the US. The Jimi Hendrix Experience became one of the most popular and successful touring acts in the world."

Keep in mind when you watch that on stage performance of two factors. One Hendrix was pissed off because he had to go on after The Who, according to Pete Townsend (part of the reason he destroys his guitar like Townsend did in The Who's act). Second, during his performance he was tripping his friggen brains out on TWO hits of a special batch of Acid (LSD) specially formulated by Owsley Stanley for the The Monterey Festival called Monterey Purple :D :eek:

R_dHL8JZPYI

RobertCTS
10-27-06, 11:52 AM
I thought it was inreresting that he was left handed and diddent want to play right handed. So he plays his guitar upside down after re-stringing his guitar.

AlBundy
10-27-06, 08:43 PM
I thought it was inreresting that he was left handed and diddent want to play right handed. So he plays his guitar upside down after re-stringing his guitar.

Im my band days our left handed guitar player played upside down and he didn't restring his guitar.

CIWS
10-28-06, 09:55 AM
Jump back on thread topic for a min (although I luvs the Jimi).
Here's some perspective from a Sufi Master who passed in the late 1920's as I was reading from him this morning.

"Intellect is the knowledge of names and forms, their character and nature, gathered from the external world. It shows in an infant from birth, when he begins to be curious about all he sees; then, by storing in his mind the various forms and figures he sees he recognizes them as an addition to his knowledge of variety. Man thus gathers the knowledge of numberless forms of the whole world in his mind and holds them... and calls that 'learning'. This becomes his world, although it neither gives him a sense of unchanging comfort, nor does he thereby gain an everlasting peace.

Wisdom is contrary to the above-named knowledge. It is the knowledge which is illumined by the light within; it comes with the maturity of the soul, and opens up the sight to the similarity of all things and beings, as well as the unity in names and forms. The wise man penetrates the spirit of all things; he sees the human in the male and female, and the racial origin which unites nations. He sees the human in all people and the divine immanence in all things in the universe, until the vision of the whole being becomes to him the vision of the One Alone, the most beautiful and beloved God."

Hazrat Inayat Khan

Spyder
10-28-06, 04:42 PM
Hmmmm...I've always thought wisdom was closely related to logic...maybe even moreso than to learned knowledge or experience. Experience is usually brought on by making poor decisions because of a lack of knowledge or thinking things through. If logic is used to not make those poor decisions in the first place, than experience isn't gained by making mistakes and one will never get "wise" by way of experience...

I must go to work, but I think this thread will be a good one for me to come back to afterwards and expand on my thoughts here.

JimHare
10-29-06, 10:00 AM
One Hendrix was pissed off because he had to go on after The Who, according to Pete Townsend (part of the reason he destroys his guitar like Townsend did in The Who's act).

Actually, it was the other way around - he and Pete and the organizers couldn't or wouldn't agree on which act would close the Saturday night show - so he and Pete flipped a coin, and Hendrix won - to go on last. Pete, having seen Jimi in England, knew what kind of stage act he'd put on, so he decided to try to steal some thunder. You always want to go on last - not AFTER some other act has totally blown the audience away. Pete and the boys did the best they could, knowing that Jimi was liable to completely freak out the audience...

Sorry for the hijack...

:thepan: :thepan:

CIWS
10-29-06, 03:29 PM
Actually, it was the other way around - he and Pete and the organizers couldn't or wouldn't agree on which act would close the Saturday night show - so he and Pete flipped a coin, and Hendrix won - to go on last. Pete, having seen Jimi in England, knew what kind of stage act he'd put on, so he decided to try to steal some thunder. You always want to go on last - not AFTER some other act has totally blown the audience away. Pete and the boys did the best they could, knowing that Jimi was liable to completely freak out the audience...

Sorry for the hijack...

:thepan: :thepan:

Actually, I'm not sure where you heard that, but here it is straight from Pete Townsend... Unless you think he's telling stories on camera.

:thepan:


NF1FVINOzLY


EDIT - Also if you check you'll discover both The Who and The Jimi Hendrix Experience played the last day of the show on Sunday night, June 18th, not Saturday.

Elvis
10-29-06, 03:36 PM
I think Albert King played that way too.

I saw him live once. He broke a string, pointed to his horns to each play a solo, put in a new string, started a loud solo of his own, and actually tuned the guitar while he was playing it.

http://staxrecords.free.fr/albertking580.jpg

Kev
10-29-06, 10:28 PM
My simple definition of wisdom is this;

"Wisdom is the appropriate application of knowledge at the proper time."

Here's another good quote; "Wisdom is a defense."

.. and another; "Even a fool is thought wise if he keeps silent, and discerning if he holds his tongue."

JimHare
10-30-06, 07:18 AM
Actually, I'm not sure where you heard that, but here it is straight from Pete Townsend... Unless you think he's telling stories on camera.

EDIT - Also if you check you'll discover both The Who and The Jimi Hendrix Experience played the last day of the show on Sunday night, June 18th, not Saturday.

Hmm...you may be right - I have the DVD set of the M. Pop festival, and I seem to remember while listening to the 'commentary' by Lou Adler and D.A. Pennebaker that they described what I reported - but then reading the booklet, (duh..read the directions first..) the Sunday night was the Who, The Grateful Dead, and THEN Hendrix...

Yet if you watch the DVDs, they make it look like Ravi Shankar closed the show the next morning...which I thought was Sunday..

My Bad...blame it on Owsley.. :)

CIWS
10-30-06, 09:13 AM
..blame it on Owsley.. :)

I think we can blame a few things on him :D (at least his concoctions make a good scapegoat)