: what's ironical about the catera and it's propensity to wander/tramline



wamanning
10-16-06, 06:24 PM
it's based on the opel omega - a vehicle born and bred to be safe and completely at ease on the high-speed autobahn of germany.

but it's apparently got a front-end design which is suceptible to developing a mind of it's own - see thread on tramlining: http://www.cadillacforums.com/forums/cadillac-catera-cimarron-forum/86944-tramlining-aka-un-happy-wanderer.html

it's almost ridiculous that this dichotomy exists.

what do our german counterparts do w/ their omega-b to ensure reliable and predictable handling on rutted roads? maybe roads in germany are just better in general, and this is a moot point.

aldi
10-17-06, 05:52 AM
Well, the normal roads here in Germany are not better than in the US i think. Except the autobahn without speed limit, there you have mostly a smooth surface.
The tendency of tramlining is for sure above the average but it's not that extrem that you can say it's a major problem. If the cars suspension bushings and steering is o.k. and the toe and camber are properly set then you will have only a minimal tramlining with the factory wheels (and thats the only thing we can do in Germany). Most FWD cars have a lot more tramlining than the average Catera.
Developing a suspension is always a compromise between safety, comfort, package, handling and costs. There is no ideal suspension that fits all the requirements. Eliminating the tramlining would have resulted in a rougher and noisier ride or higher steering forces for example. Every customer has other demands concerning his car, so you can't fit them all. I, for example, can accept the tramling but have a problem with the setting of the anti roll bars. But thats just my opinion.

Warez
10-17-06, 07:16 PM
I live near some street car track and drive on them quite often and I don't think that the propensity for the Catera to tramline is any worse than any other car I've driven. Mine is a Sport with the 235 tires.

Maybe the issue is your alignment settings?

wamanning
11-28-06, 10:41 AM
Maybe the issue is your alignment settings?


not likely.

i've had the alignment done 2x in the last 12 months by the local cadillac dealer.

graphicsman
11-28-06, 12:22 PM
I used to have tramlining with Michelin Pilots. When I switched to Continental ExtremeContacts (225/55/R16), the tramlining went away. Just a thought for those who need to switch out tires anyway.

Elo
11-28-06, 05:33 PM
I have Fuzion ZRi's on my Cat (255/55/R16) and have yet to experience any tramlining in my Cat... Our roads down here in Gainesville are pretty craptastic, too... SO MANY SPEEDBUMPS

-Elo

mrman88
11-29-06, 02:20 AM
Much of my problem with that was solved by increasing the tire pressure to the high speed pressure on the label on the door. That is 37 psi.

RADman2000
01-03-07, 10:51 PM
it's based on the opel omega - a vehicle born and bred to be safe and completely at ease on the high-speed autobahn of germany.

but it's apparently got a front-end design which is suceptible to developing a mind of it's own - see thread on tramlining: http://www.cadillacforums.com/forums/cadillac-catera-cimarron-forum/86944-tramlining-aka-un-happy-wanderer.html

it's almost ridiculous that this dichotomy exists.

what do our german counterparts do w/ their omega-b to ensure reliable and predictable handling on rutted roads? maybe roads in germany are just better in general, and this is a moot point.

I lived in Germany for 3 years and several years ago spent two weeks driving an Opel Omega around Germany and Austria. No, I don't think that German roads are necessarily better than those in the U.S., though variability by state/region is common in both countries. I do think the fact that most Omegas use 195/65/15 tires minimizes tramlining (degree of tramlining is definitely correlated with wider tires). I also think the fact that a majority of Omegas are 4 cylinders, with commensurate lower front-end weight, probably helps to reduce tramlining.

That said, I think there is a lot of anecdotal evidence indicating that tramlining is largely a characteristic of a given model of tire, either because of tread design, sidewall dynamics, or both. These characteristics, in combination with the suspension geometry and dynamics of a particular car, combine to cause tramlining. I believe the Catera is more susceptible to tramlining than most cars, but there are many tires out there that minimize the problem to the point of a non-issue. The problem is, you really won't know which tires are prone to tramlining on the Catera until you buy them.

Marks DTM Calib
01-04-07, 04:18 AM
We get this sort of issue in the UK when the following problems are evident:

1) Wishbone bushes worn (normaly 80K+miles)
2) Steering idler play
3) Poorly set geometery

Item 3 is an interesting one, the setup on this unit is pretty adjustable and to date, there is only a handful of places in the UK we have found to be upto the job of setting the geometry on any car correctly (many have the machines but lack the knowledge).

I personaly use a spirit level for camber (1deg 20secs is optimum) and a set f alser levesl for front and rear track. This works well.

From what I have read about the Cadiallac dealers they seem to be ona apr with our Opel/Vauxhall dealers in Europe, and I wouldn't trust any of these to be able to set the geometry correctly!