: We were/are so poor that.....................



CVP33
10-03-06, 10:32 PM
Another thread got me thinking about this. I'm lucky enough to make a good living now but......................

Grew up in a trailer, literally next to rail road tracks in Michigan. Mom shopped at Goodwill and Salvation Army for our school clothes. She never accepted welfare of any kind, no food stamps, nothing. But probably should have. I started working at age 10 mowing lawns and helping a retired civil engineer with every home project that he could think of. At age 15 I worked at a Meat Market. I love when people use the quote "It's now how you start, it's how you finish". To which I reply, it absolutely IS how you start. Many times that's what gives you the grit to finish at all.

I can't be the only kid that grew up drinking powdered milk. Anyone else?

chuckdobbins
10-03-06, 11:27 PM
my father will be 46 this new years eve. i think you two would get along great lol.

hes told me stories of powdered milk, baked mac and cheese almost every night, and if not that...boiled hot dogs. shepherds pie was a luxury!

he has 6 brothers and 3 sisters! the house they lived in isnt big enough for a family with 2 kids these days.

although hes physically disabled now from a freak ski accident, theres no doubt in my mind that by busting his A55 for all those years he brought himself and our family from rags to "riches" (i use the term VERY loosely). we lived in a 3 family craphole in the city, high crime, just a bad place to be. he wont think so, but i think hes done a remarkable job in bettering the lives of his family.

we are by no means rich, heck id say we are the lower rungs of middle class. but the house is gorgeous (thanks to dads money and moms hard work lol), and he and i are rolling caddies. although i started the trend of cadillacs in the family =)

kinda makes me wish he would stumble across this post someday :worship:

SpeedyArizona
10-03-06, 11:32 PM
Grew up in a trailer, literally next to rail road tracks in Michigan. Mom shopped at Goodwill and Salvation Army for our school clothes. She never accepted welfare of any kind, no food stamps, nothing. But probably should have. I started working at age 10 mowing lawns and helping a retired civil engineer with every home project that he could think of. At age 15 I worked at a Meat Market. I love when people use the quote "It's now how you start, it's how you finish". To which I reply, it absolutely IS how you start. Many times that's what gives you the grit to finish at all.

I didn't grow up exactly like that but I definetly can relate to the work issue. I grew up on a farm in Iowa and it was no picnic. When I was probably 9 or 10 I had to get up at 5:30 every morning before school and help my dad do chores. Never got paid for it, it was just expected. Because of how I was raised I have a hard time thinking how pre-teens and teens have lives of a socialite. My schedule for many years until about 15 was:

5:30-7 Did Chores
7-8 Had breakfast and got ready for school
8-3 In School
3-5 Did more chores
5-6 Watched a little tv and ate dinner
6-8 Did homework and maybe a little tv (unless it was fall then I was in the field helping my father)
9 Went to bed and repeated the process

I wasn't raised poor but I was raised with a good work ethic. Our farm was nearly 800 acres so there were plenty of things that needed to be done. I look back on it now and think it was a good thing that I learned to work at such a young age.

davesdeville
10-03-06, 11:39 PM
My family was pretty poor when I was younger.. Lived in an apartment that was owned by my aunt and had 1 car, which was some POS Corolla that had rusted through floorpans. Fast foreward 12 years, now we have the house paid off and drive cars that don't suck and that don't break down every month. I should quit being a bum and mooching off them...

SpeedyArizona
10-03-06, 11:40 PM
he has 6 brothers and 3 sisters! the house they lived in isnt big enough for a family with 2 kids these days

I was ashamed to bring friends out to my house. Some of the pipes in the basement leaked, the kitchen was falling apart, the carpet was shag (god I loved that stuff), and it needed a serious painjob inside and out. My parents had it fixed up a few years ago and I couldn't believe it was the same house at first!

DILLIGAF
10-03-06, 11:43 PM
I was born a poor black child

LittleB
10-03-06, 11:47 PM
I was born a poor black child

And somehow you turned out to be a white man? :confused: :histeric:

My mom and dad both grew up in poor households. I never had to experience being poor myself but I still have a good work ethic and still value what I have.

DILLIGAF
10-03-06, 11:52 PM
Points for F when I get some!!!!Meg you have homework,Steve Martin movies

Stoneage_Caddy
10-04-06, 12:03 AM
bwahahahaha steve martin rules in that flick

I grew up lisntening to arguments start over money after i ask if we could go to macdonalds. I remeber being scolded about hotwheels cars and how we couldnt afford that. Being stuck on roofs when we had to patch it. Hamburger helper was a staple , if it wasnt that it was spagetti. Our vacations would be when dad was sent somewhere to work for a week , wed pile int he car and go.

But all the while they were saveing for me to go to college , and constantly bugging me about how i needed to go and how i needed to have stright As and shit. Spent most of my childhood grounded for my poor performance when it came to school . When your the only white kid there and you get stuck in a 2nd grade class becuse "thrid grade is full" you start to loose modivation. By the time highschool ended for me , we had moved on up and bought a brand new house by a lake thats wicked expensive , they had new cars and my little brother had 3 powerwheel cars among every other toy a kid could want.

How did i think them for scrimping and svaing for me to go to college ? Told them to shove the money and that id get my own. Threw a hand up and joined the military with the question "how soon can you get me in?"

The values i learned from it all is to be fiercely independent , and that if you want it , and you want it your way , you do it yourself , and you bust your ass till you got it.

Spent 2.5 years in college , got shafted one too many times ,being told im one credit away from graduateing for 3 semsters stright , i finally had to call it over. I work full time now , make decent money , and maybe one day when i find a college that isnt about lieing to students to make a buck ill go backand finish degree one and think about number 2. Right now im just focusing on getting my life back together after it was turned to shit last may.

CadillacGurl
10-04-06, 12:28 AM
My parents were total opposites. My dad grew up in Cali an only child, living the high life but it was all knocked away when his parents got divorced. He went with his Dad to Illinois, they both worked. He barely kept in touch with his mom until recently, I'd like to meet her some day. She's lives in Corona, CA, I like the town's name haha.

My mom grew up with 4 siblings, let's just say they lived in a house the size of an apartment building. Growing up was tough and she thanks god where she is today. Cigarettes for her father is where all the money went. Sadly he died at 52, I never got to meet him.

I grew up in a decent sized house in Westmont, IL. We've had my mom's van broke into many times and my dad's camry stolen. Dad worked for a company called Venture (similar to Target) which later fell apart resulting in us moving to Pennsylvania. When my dad showed me the blueprints for the house we were building let's just say it was HUGE. Now my dad works for a Dick's Sporting Goods in a high position. Yeah we got decent cars, I really don't like to brag about it. I just know how it is having my parents bicker about bills and money issues. Plus taking in my Dad's father really didn't help with the money issue.

codewize
10-04-06, 12:40 AM
I'm not going to get into a long story but lets just say the family car was a 72 Pinto with the drivers door held on and shut with insulation foam 'Great Stuff' if you're familiar with that. We drove that until the guy at the garage wouldn't inspect in anymore.

We had a 68 VW beetle now mind you there are four kids here. A Chevy pickup with a cap so the kids could travel in the back, Yeah road trip to NC in the back of a pick up. Thanks Dad.

These vehicles were all owned one at a time BTW.

We always had a decent home but hot-dogs were a very common diner. I too had Salvation Army clothes until high school.

And I agree that were you start almost defines where you'll end up. Many kids these days have it so good they have no survival skills at all. I tell them stories about eating mayonnaise sandwiches for dinner and they think I'm nuts. I've slept in my car plenty of times with no money and very little income. That kind of life forces you to try harder all the time.

OffThaHorseCEO
10-04-06, 12:42 AM
i was raised on beans and rice

my father was out of the picture since i was about 8, not completely out of the picture, hed drop by and leave my mom a chunk of money and give us all a few dollars "for sodas". but other than that i hardly saw him. my mother was a young single mother of 9 who worked so many hours i hardly saw her either, sometimes it brought tears to my eyes when my younger brothers who didnt know better would ask for new clothes or things and shed say no with the saddest look on her face. we lived in a singlewide trailer with two bedrooms 2 bathrooms a living room and a kitchen, my sister was the oldest, she got her own room, my mom had a room, the boys shared the living room floor.

afterward we "moved up" into a house which was actually a trailer with additions built onto it, it ended up being the same room situations though and the boys shared the floor. i started working at 14 to buy myself the clothes and shoes and items that every teen just "has to have". sure it was selfish and materialistic, but i never asked my mom for anything. i also helped with what bills i could at the time, but mcdonalds pay for a teen doesnt go very far. a hurricane hit and the house we were in got condemned, the roof peeled back and water went everywhere, we stayed in a unwatered unpowered trailer for a few months, we went to the neighbors (family) for showers and other things and used a few extension cords to light the place. eventually we found a house from the twenties beside a railroad track for rent, and stayed there, ocver the winter, it was uninsulated so we all got sick and my youngest brother got really sick to the point of seizure inducing fevers. apparently my mom had been saving up money cause that february we moved into a doublewide/land package she had bought, it was small but so much better, and it was ours, sure she was makin payments, but mortgage payments and not rent payments. it was still too small (3 bedroom 2 bath) but my lil brothers were in the sleepover stage and my older brother was always working as was i. eventually me and my younger and older brother moved out. my mom got a better job and ever since then everything is gravy, my lil brothers all wear designer everything,20 dollar socks etnies, element, brand name stuff. they dont know wat we went thru, i wanna slap them sometimes when they complain about shopping at walmart.

i can say that i never felt neglected, even though my mom worked long hours just to pay the bills. i knew she loved me and always had always will.

also i learned that shit just isnt handed to you, and life is bad sometimes, but stick it out, and work work work. eventually itll get better.

JimHare
10-04-06, 06:48 AM
Jeeze, I feel almost guilty now...

2nd of four kids. Both parents taught school. Grandparents and Great-Grandmother lived "next door", more or less - out in the country near West Chester, PA. Dad often worked summers to bring in extra money while we were younger - I remember him at Pepperidge Farms and elsewhere.

BUT, always worked for any major items after I was about 14 or 15 - even my first bicycle. Bought all my own cars. Paid for my college education.

All in all, my early years were pretty much idyllic - Tom Sawyer in Levis and Desert Boots...:thumbsup:

Kudos to anyone who perseveres against adversity and makes it on his/her own.

HITMONEY
10-04-06, 07:43 AM
We were so poor, Ethiopians sent us food....

We were so poor, that we had to borrow dirt from the neighbors...

We were so poor, when my little brother broke his arm we had to take him out to the airport for x-rays....

We were so poor we'd lick stamps for dinner....

We were so poor my dad would eat Cheerios with a fork so we could save the milk for later...

We were so poor we couldn't even have a family portrait done. Every time the photographer said cheese, we would line up....

We were so poor, at night, my dad unplugged the clocks....

We were so poor we had to fart in the bath to warm it up...

We were so poor we went to KFC and licked other peoples fingers...

We were so poor that in winter we had to sit around a candle to keep warm.
And when it was REALLY cold we used to light it....

In summary, we were so poor, we didn't even use the O and the R, we were just po.



And the classic.....

Monty Python's
We Were So Poor Script

Four well-dressed men sitting together at a vacation resort. "Farewell
to Thee" being played in the background on Hawaiian guitar.

Michael Palin: Ahh.. Very passable, this, very passable.

Graham Chapman: Nothing like a good glass of Chateau de Chassilier wine,
ay Gessiah?

Terry Gilliam: You're right there Obediah.

Eric Idle: Who'd a thought thirty years ago we'd all be sittin'
here drinking Chateau de Chassilier wine?

MP: Aye. In them days, we'd a' been glad to have the price of a cup
o' tea.

GC: A cup ' COLD tea.

EI: Without milk or sugar.

TG: OR tea!

MP: In a filthy, cracked cup.

EI: We never used to have a cup. We used to have to drink out of a
rolled up newspaper.

GC: The best WE could manage was to suck on a piece of damp cloth.

TG: But you know, we were happy in those days, though we were poor.

MP: Aye. BECAUSE we were poor. My old Dad used to say to me, "Money
doesn't buy you happiness."

EI: 'E was right. I was happier then and I had NOTHIN'. We used to
live in this tiiiny old house, with greaaaaat big holes in the roof.

GC: House? You were lucky to have a HOUSE! We used to live in one
room, all hundred and twenty-six of us, no furniture. Half the
floor was missing; we were all huddled together in one corner for
fear of FALLING!

TG: You were lucky to have a ROOM! *We* used to have to live in a
corridor!

MP: Ohhhh we used to DREAM of livin' in a corridor! Woulda' been a
palace to us. We used to live in an old water tank on a rubbish
tip. We got woken up every morning by having a load of rotting
fish dumped all over us! House!? Hmph.

EI: Well when I say "house" it was only a hole in the ground covered
by a piece of tarpolin, but it was a house to US.

GC: We were evicted from *our* hole in the ground; we had to go and
live in a lake!

TG: You were lucky to have a LAKE! There were a hundred and sixty
of us living in a small shoebox in the middle of the road.

MP: Cardboard box?

TG: Aye.

MP: You were lucky. We lived for three months in a brown paper bag in
a septic tank. We used to have to get up at six o'clock in the
morning, clean the bag, eat a crust of stale bread, go to work down
mill for fourteen hours a day week in-week out. When we got home,
out Dad would thrash us to sleep with his belt!

GC: Luxury. We used to have to get out of the lake at three o'clock in
the morning, clean the lake, eat a handful of hot gravel, go to
work at the mill every day for tuppence a month, come home, and Dad
would beat us around the head and neck with a broken bottle, if we
were LUCKY!

TG: Well we had it tough. We used to have to get up out of the shoebox
at twelve o'clock at night, and LICK the road clean with our tongues.
We had half a handful of freezing cold gravel, worked twenty-four
hours a day at the mill for fourpence every six years, and when we
got home, our Dad would slice us in two with a bread knife.

EI: Right. I had to get up in the morning at ten o'clock at night,
half an hour before I went to bed, (pause for laughter), eat a lump
of cold poison, work twenty-nine hours a day down mill, and pay mill
owner for permission to come to work, and when we got home,
our Dad would kill us, and dance about on our graves
singing "Hallelujah."

MP: But you try and tell the young people today that... and they won't
believe ya'.

ALL: Nope, nope..






Ok, so i thought it was a joke thread.

<shrugs>

;)

CIWS
10-04-06, 08:17 AM
Monty Python's
We Were So Poor Script
;)

Python Rocks !


I was raised in a middle class / upper middle class home, bio parents divorced when I was 6. Mother remarried when I was 8. I never ever really had any knowledge of being in need. That may be because my parents knew it well, being born and raised during the years of the great depression. My uncle (mother's brother)was born in a railroad car, because they had no home at the time.

However due to faith and understanding I do give to the poor and those who support the poor now, as well as support a poor child through C.C.F. who lives in Indonesia. His family consists of the two parents and 4 children living on what equates to 105.00 U.S. dollars a year.

Destroyer
10-04-06, 08:33 AM
Grew up in Queens, NY. My parents were immigrants and poor as hell. They didn't even have a car till I was 6 or 7 and our place was small. They got us out of that and made a great living afterwards.

Slywun
10-04-06, 08:51 AM
We were so poor that we ate spaghetto (ketchup on spaghetti).

dp102288
10-04-06, 09:47 AM
I didn't grow up rich, but we were not very poor.

Glad most of us turned out okay though. You can start out in one category and end up in another, quite well too.

P-Funk
10-04-06, 10:42 AM
When I was growing up, we weren't dirt poor but we were definitely not rich. Eating out (like at McDonald's) was a treat. Only bought things when we needed them and if they were on sale and/or had coupons.




Python Rocks !

However due to faith and understanding I do give to the poor and those who support the poor now, as well as support a poor child through C.C.F. who lives in Indonesia. His family consists of the two parents and 4 children living on what equates to 105.00 U.S. dollars a year.

I support a child in Indonesia also (although it is through Compassion International).

CIWS
10-04-06, 11:08 AM
I support a child in Indonesia also (although it is through Compassion International).


That's great man :thumbsup: Lot's of folks out there that can use our assistance.:)

malcolm
10-04-06, 11:26 AM
I was born a poor black child
I think next week I'll be able to send some more money as I may have extra work. My friend Patty promised me a blow job. Your loving son, Navin.:histeric:

DILLIGAF
10-04-06, 01:32 PM
I think next week I'll be able to send some more money as I may have extra work. My friend Patty promised me a blow job. Your loving son, Navin.:histeric:
Thank you:worship: :worship:

DILLIGAF
10-04-06, 01:37 PM
On a serious side,I had a dad that worked 80+ hours every week so we could have nice things.We had always food,clothes,and a summer vacation.He died a very happy successfull man,and his survivors will be gratefull forever.

codewize
10-04-06, 02:21 PM
Yes eating out was a treat for us also. When the tax returns came we went out to a nice family dinner.

And why are some avatars missing LIKE MINE?

Ahh I see. My support subscription ran out and broke the avatar layout. We're all better now that I renewed. I am once again a proud supporting member

CVP33
10-04-06, 07:20 PM
I really enjoyed reading the stories each of you posted. The mayo sandwiches and spaghetto really hit home. I'll share a little more with ya'. My Wife and I got married at 22 and our first son was born a year later. I made $7.50 an hour at the supermarket and she $5.30 an hour as a bank teller. Thank god I had bennies or I don't know how we could have afforded the hospital bill. It became pretty obvious that we wouldn't be able to make ends meet with a new baby unless something changed. So, for the next three years I worked the following:

2am - 4am Delivered Newspapers EVERYDAY (St. Petersburg Times in FL. 350 copies, walk route) Gruelling and nearly crippling on Sunday with the weight of the papers.
4am - 5am Return home, shower and ready for "real" job
7am - 5pm Produce Manager local supermarket
5pm-5:30pm Grab a quick dinner at the store's deli
5:30pm - 8pm Paint apartments next door to the supermarket

I did this for 3 years, drove a 1975 4 door Buick LeSabre with no air (in FL remember) and paid off all our bills and managed to stash away $25,000. The best feeling in the world at 26 years old was being debt free with that money in the bank and tooling down the highway in my big baby blue buick land yacht. :thumbsup:

Florian
10-04-06, 08:02 PM
...when she sits around the house, shes SITS AROUND THE HOUSE!!!


oops, sorry, wrong topic.




F

dp102288
10-05-06, 09:53 AM
^^ I love this guy!!

DBA-One
10-05-06, 02:26 PM
I'm so poor I can't buy a dead man supper.

LittleB
10-05-06, 02:50 PM
I'm so poor I can't even pay attention AHAHAHAHAHA :histeric: :rofl: I always loved that one. :D

malcolm
10-05-06, 04:07 PM
If it took 10 cents to go around the world, I couldn't get out of sight.

CIWS
10-05-06, 04:50 PM
I'm so poor the only reason to go to the grocery store is to get the free samples.

illumina
10-05-06, 04:57 PM
Well, let's see...

I'm so broke that I can't exchange glances...Yeah, I know that one sucked.

Florian
10-05-06, 05:38 PM
poor me, poor me.....pour me another!



F

Lord Cadillac
10-05-06, 05:56 PM
Well, my Father left when I was 6 (my Brother was 1) and when I was lucky, I had powdered milk for my cereal. Otherwise, it was water. :p Luckily for me, it didn't last all that long and I eventually moved-in with my Grandparents who had cake and cookies galore and I became a fat kid. After a year of that, I moved in with my Father and Step-Mother. :o

dp102288
10-06-06, 10:10 AM
^^ And look how you turned out!! :D