: CTS-V Brakes HELP !!!



LS6-CTS-V
06-12-06, 12:14 PM
:confused: Hey guys, Are there any tricks to changing the the Pads on the front? Iam very experianced with factory brakes on many models of cars, but thats factory. I was wondering if there arre any tricks with the Brembo calipars???

Is there a link to look at??????

ronr
06-12-06, 12:34 PM
Did mine a couple of weeks ago and followed the instructions on the faq site. It was much easier that other factory brakes I've ever done.

www.cadillacfaq.com is your friend :)

rgd
06-12-06, 12:36 PM
#133 on cadillac faq.
I pmed the link to you!

mike041357
06-12-06, 04:12 PM
Is it really necessary to bleed the brakes after installing new pads? Doesn't the fluid just get pushed back up into the resevoir? I have some HAaks on the way (only 7500 on my current pads).

Thanks!

mike041357
06-12-06, 04:12 PM
That would be "Hawks"....

ronr
06-12-06, 04:51 PM
Is it really necessary to bleed the brakes after installing new pads? Doesn't the fluid just get pushed back up into the resevoir? I have some HAaks on the way (only 7500 on my current pads).

Thanks!
Mine did not need bleeding after the change.

Dennisscars
06-12-06, 09:14 PM
Some schools of thought indicate that it is not wise to push nasty fluid back up through the system and it is more wise to open the bleed valve to dispel the fluid that would be displaced by the pucks or more importantly if an observant operator replenished the fluid in the reservoir drawn down by pad wear then it may overfill the reservoir causing grave damage to painted surfaces.

VELOSE
06-13-06, 01:21 AM
Since you will probably need to bleed the brake system, you might want to consider some Goodridge Stainless Steel brake lines. I've heard these firm up the pedal. I'll be installing a set on my V in about a week. Then replace the brake fluid with some high temp Motul. ;)

ewill3rd
06-13-06, 07:30 AM
Replacing the pads is a snap, I usually open the bleeders when pushing the pistons in and then top with new fluid but there's no real reason to believe that the fluid in the lines and calipers is "nastier" than the fluid in the reservoir.
Brake fluid is hygroscopic and will naturally absorb moisture from the atmosphere. The system is sealed but not in a fashion that will totally prevent the fluid from getting some water molecules in it. It is a good idea to periodically "flush" the brake system with new fluid to keep the moisture from corroding senstive internal parts.
If you replace the fluid with anything, make sure it is DOT-3 spec fluid.
Some other DOT fluids can cause seal or component damage if they are not truly compatible with DOT-3.

It is not required to bleed the system unless you open a line and allow air to enter the brake system. Pushing the fluid back up into the master cylinder or opening the bleeder while you retract the pistons should not allow that to happen.

Just look at the pads before you remove them and make sure it looks the same when you are done. You'll be surprised how easy it is.

Dennisscars
06-13-06, 09:30 AM
ok, maybe not nastier, but particularly with DOT 3 will absorb moisture from the concrete. None the less, since the fluid does not move around the fluid in the calipers will have the most heat (hottest) cycles, thus the most spanked. Witnessed by the gold calipers I would not want to push that golden fluid up the system.

but just my .01765 cents worth.