: Masking Oil Smoke?



DopeStar 156
06-06-06, 02:29 PM
I need a way to get my car through inspection. Supposedly it's burning oil and I was wondering if anyone had any suggestions on how to cover this up just to pass inspection. Any suggestions are apperciated. Thanks.

Destroyer
06-06-06, 03:27 PM
I dont think you can do that bro.

VicVega
06-06-06, 05:02 PM
Actually there are few things that you can try...at your own risk.

If the car sits alot you need to start driving it regularly before your yearly test. Sitting is tough on your engine and will make sure you fail.

Cast iron V8's tend loose their intake seals. Re-torque the intake to factory specs.

Change the PCV valve, its hose and the grommet in the valve cover in one unit to make sure you are pulling all the blow by out of the engine.

If the valve covers are leaking oil they are leaking vacuum you will need to re-gasket each one and make sure they are clean.

Change your oil and by that I mean change the brand. All oils are about the same the additives are what is different. All oils have different additives. Run the new oil daily for 500 miles change then run engine cleaner through the engine and add the same "new" oil and filter. What this does is disolves the old varnish (additives) that have built up in your engine. This may loosen up the oil and compression rings enough to stop the engine from smoking.

Change the thermostat to 195, this does two thing raises the operating temp and makes sure your old stat which might have been stuck is removed. A cold engine "pumps" oil because it won't get warm enough to seal up. Install a temp gauge to get a base line on the new 195 stat. Now cover half the radiator to drive the temp up to no more than 225. Trial and error needed here. Again warming the engine above the normal operating temp may help seal your rings and stop the smoke for short time. On the day you take the next test make sure the engine is at normal operating temp go to the test and drop the cardboard in place. When done remove and drive the car asap to cool off the engine.

Not being sure what your skill set might be I don't want to go too far with ideas here. For example, your carb can cause the engine to oil smoke, not just fuel smoke if the idle is too low OR the mix is too rich. Too slow and the engine cools down and pumps, too rich and the fuel will flood the cylinders and turn any oil on the cylinder walls left by worn oil rings into fuel (smoke). If you know your Qjet then consider bumping the idle slighlty before the test and turn the idle mixture screws in a 1/4 turn to run the engine lean and hot. The test guys should not be touching any of your settings. If they are go somewhere else, they are trying to get your car off the road.

Good luck.

VV

DopeStar 156
06-07-06, 02:11 AM
Actually there are few things that you can try...at your own risk.

If the car sits alot you need to start driving it regularly before your yearly test. Sitting is tough on your engine and will make sure you fail.

Cast iron V8's tend loose their intake seals. Re-torque the intake to factory specs.

Change the PCV valve, its hose and the grommet in the valve cover in one unit to make sure you are pulling all the blow by out of the engine.

If the valve covers are leaking oil they are leaking vacuum you will need to re-gasket each one and make sure they are clean.

Change your oil and by that I mean change the brand. All oils are about the same the additives are what is different. All oils have different additives. Run the new oil daily for 500 miles change then run engine cleaner through the engine and add the same "new" oil and filter. What this does is disolves the old varnish (additives) that have built up in your engine. This may loosen up the oil and compression rings enough to stop the engine from smoking.

Change the thermostat to 195, this does two thing raises the operating temp and makes sure your old stat which might have been stuck is removed. A cold engine "pumps" oil because it won't get warm enough to seal up. Install a temp gauge to get a base line on the new 195 stat. Now cover half the radiator to drive the temp up to no more than 225. Trial and error needed here. Again warming the engine above the normal operating temp may help seal your rings and stop the smoke for short time. On the day you take the next test make sure the engine is at normal operating temp go to the test and drop the cardboard in place. When done remove and drive the car asap to cool off the engine.

Not being sure what your skill set might be I don't want to go too far with ideas here. For example, your carb can cause the engine to oil smoke, not just fuel smoke if the idle is too low OR the mix is too rich. Too slow and the engine cools down and pumps, too rich and the fuel will flood the cylinders and turn any oil on the cylinder walls left by worn oil rings into fuel (smoke). If you know your Qjet then consider bumping the idle slighlty before the test and turn the idle mixture screws in a 1/4 turn to run the engine lean and hot. The test guys should not be touching any of your settings. If they are go somewhere else, they are trying to get your car off the road.

Good luck.

VV
Thank you. :D

BluEyes
06-07-06, 10:17 AM
Will the inspection people tell you *when* during the test you are burning oil?
Is it under acceleration, at steady throttle, or after lifting off the throttle? Each would point to a different problem and a different seal that might need replacing.

DopeStar 156
06-07-06, 04:00 PM
Well I'm pretty much ****ed. I've gotta park it and save up $1,000 for the valve job. I took it in today and I was told there was no way around it. If anyone wants to send me sympathy money feel free. Haha.

N0DIH
06-07-06, 04:26 PM
I would go with a straight 30w oil, synthetic preffered (Amsoil is one of the few who makes a 30 weight synth) to help seal the rings better. Being Amsoil is 100% synthetic, the oil that burns is less likely to be "bad" than dino oil.

Is idle set to spec? It should be around 450 rpm in drive. Lower idle is less oil burning too.

My $0.02 worth....

CoupeDevilleRob
06-07-06, 04:37 PM
I never realized how strict Jersey was with inspections. Too bad you don't live in New York because I know a guy...

Destroyer
06-07-06, 05:47 PM
Well I'm pretty much ****ed. I've gotta park it and save up $1,000 for the valve job. I took it in today and I was told there was no way around it. If anyone wants to send me sympathy money feel free. Haha.You got a lot of good tips here. All of which to some extent may work but I dont believe they will get you to pass. You know what you need to do.

N0DIH
06-07-06, 05:53 PM
Move to Wisconsin, we don't test emissions once you get away from Milwaukee

90Brougham350
06-07-06, 05:59 PM
Try running some kerosene through the oil to get all the sludge and crap out totally, then like NODIH suggested, use Amsoil. Now make sure and fill it with about 20% Lucas. See if that does any good.

N0DIH
06-07-06, 06:02 PM
https://www.amsoil.com/storefront/ahr.aspx

Try this one. This is what I would be going for if I was desperate to make it pass

mjflem
06-07-06, 06:25 PM
Buy a whole case of those vanilla scented trees and spread them around your car! They will want to get you on your way ASAP. :eek:

caddydream
06-07-06, 07:16 PM
Well, if you need a valve job there's not much you can do to cover smoke. But, if it's burning oil, ah-ha! You can seal things better such as the rings by using something such as Lucas Oil.
I stopped my smoke and quieted the engine by replacing 1 to 2 quarts of the oil with Lucas.

Check with your local parts store.

N0DIH
06-07-06, 07:18 PM
I have a half of a gallon jug downstairs, stop on by....

I haven't tried it in the engine, just in a rear end (the truck's!!!) and it failed shortly after. It was attempting to bandaid a rear axle that ran dry on oil.... It didn't work....

You could install duals and that is 50% less oil smoke out. Or if it is from one side, have them smog the other side....

77CDV
06-07-06, 07:25 PM
Of course, depending on how much room and time you have, you could always grab a FSM and take a crash course in engine overhauling. Or not.

N0DIH
06-07-06, 07:28 PM
Time to get a set of 1984 307 heads and intake and go for a low buck 10 hp boost in power!

Port the heads and work them for more hp.

You can get a set of older 5a heads and mill them for 9.3:1 compression and go for more power.

If you have money to burn, I know some of the most awesome Olds heads....

http://rocketracingperformance.com/

If it wasn't for me, these heads wouldn't exist....

CoupeDevilleRob
06-07-06, 09:32 PM
My front main seal used to leak like a siv, like a quart a week (An HT 4100 with an oil leak? No!?). Then I started using Valvoline Max Life and the leak has all but stopped. Maybe running some high mileage oil with seal conditioners would help. Unfortunately for you it took a few oil changes and a couple thousand miles for it to start working in my car. It seems like you don't have that kind of time. BTW, what is the mileage on your car?

N0DIH
06-08-06, 12:09 AM
First off, don't wast $1000 on a valve job, the grinding work is only $200 anyway.

Try this on for size....

http://www.crateenginedepot.com/store/1985---1990-Oldsmobile-307-LV2-Reman-Goodwrench-Engine-22537807-P67C0.aspx

DopeStar 156
06-08-06, 02:35 AM
NJ has cracked down on shotty inspections. They first check for smoking before they do the emissions tests, so they'll pretty much floor the gas to look for smoking. I dunno how well I can mask it. It needs to not smoke at all to pass. The car has 133k on it or something to that extent. If you guys really think that Amsoil stuff will clear it up, and I mean REALLY clear it up, I'll have to get some of that stuff.

Here's what I don't get...... NJ will grant you a "waver" which pretty much means you get a valid inspection sticker that's only good for a year if you fail emissions which is a $500-$600 fix. However if you're smoking and need $1,000 worth of engine work, you're ****ed. What kinda shit logic is that?!

caddydream
06-08-06, 06:48 AM
A lighter and a scraper.

#1 Find a car with a good inspection sticker.

#2 Heat the sticker with the lighter from the outside side of window.

#3 Carefully peel the sticker off using the scraper.

#4 Transfer to car of your choice.

#5 Good for another year.

BluEyes
06-08-06, 10:01 AM
Well I'm pretty much ****ed. I've gotta park it and save up $1,000 for the valve job. I took it in today and I was told there was no way around it. If anyone wants to send me sympathy money feel free. Haha.

Well, with the car parked at least you'll have time to call around and find a better shop that won't try to screw you over...

I'll assume the smoke is when you let off the gas then? You might also see a small puff of smoke on a cold start after sitting overnight.

Half of what they will do in a valve job won't affect the oil burning at all. The actual grinding of the valves will NOT stop oil burning. Replacing the valve guides will, but you should also be able to get by with just valve seals if you switch to the newer style "umbrella" seals. Good news is that valve seals can be replaced without removing the heads. ie: a ton less labor!

If you are the DIY type, go to www.rockauto.com and look up a valve stem seal set for your car. I see $10 for the Fel-Pro brand set. With a few simple tools and maybe some air pressure you can do this in your driveway. Or, if you call around, I'm sure you can also find a shop that will put on new valve seals for a ton less than $1K.

Meanwhile (because your heads probably do need new valve guides) I'd hunt around for another set of heads (maybe the '84 heads that NODIH suggests) so you can have a good shop port them out and rebuild them while you're still driving your car. Then, later on, go bolt these heads on and enjoy some more power!

caddydream
06-08-06, 11:25 AM
I'm pulling my 307 out of my Delta 88 and putting in a Chevy 350 or 305 with TBI. Less muss and fuss, more horsepower/torque, cheaper, easier to get parts and do mods. Plus it will bolt up to the 200R4 tranny.

Only drawback is to convert over to the Chevy computer. I'll pull these out of the donor car/truck. Sounds easy, huh?

77CDV
06-08-06, 12:51 PM
NJ has cracked down on shotty inspections. They first check for smoking before they do the emissions tests, so they'll pretty much floor the gas to look for smoking. I dunno how well I can mask it. It needs to not smoke at all to pass. The car has 133k on it or something to that extent. If you guys really think that Amsoil stuff will clear it up, and I mean REALLY clear it up, I'll have to get some of that stuff.

Here's what I don't get...... NJ will grant you a "waver" which pretty much means you get a valid inspection sticker that's only good for a year if you fail emissions which is a $500-$600 fix. However if you're smoking and need $1,000 worth of engine work, you're ****ed. What kinda shit logic is that?!

C'mon, you should know by now that "logic" and "government" do not go together!:bigroll:

VicVega
06-08-06, 01:01 PM
Lots of good advice here, except for borrowing somebody else's sticker.

At 133K miles don't spend anytime or money at 133K that small block is ready for a redo. Doing just a valve job on your engine, with that kind of miles it will only smoke more after the work is done. Here's why, if you tighten up the top end it, guides, stems, valves, valve seats the engine will just suck oil around the rings more than it is now because the top end is tighter than the bottom end.

If this were my car I'd pull the engine and have it rebuilt or locate a long block to replace that engine.

Amsoil is good oil but its not miracle oil...I'm an Amsoil delaer and I use this all the time and have yet to see an Amsoil oil change fix a worn out engine. It will do some other things, like clean the inside of your engine top to bottom, remove alot of varnish and sludge and stop or slow down oil leaks but it won't turn the odo back.

BTW, just so you won't be surprised a rebuilt engine will smoke a little for the first 500 to 1000 until the rings seat.

Good luck.

VV

N0DIH
06-08-06, 02:10 PM
The main reason I recommend it for this is 60 weight racing oil is hard to find, synthetic harder, and Amsoil has it readiliy available. Thicker oil with a stronger film strength stands the best chance at bandaiding the problem to help get it through the smogger. IMHO....

You are correct, it won't roll the clock back and it won't fix a worn out engine, but it might get him through this time and hopefully in the mean time that crate engine for $1700 looks pretty darn good for someone who wants drop in an play. Else, rebuild is inevitable.

Key to know, does it smoke at WOT or idling/decel. Replacing the seals is around 2-3 hours work if you have the tools and only costs around $50 in parts tops. That would fix or help fix the idling/decel oil burning.

Rings, that is far more involved. In Wisconsin a swap from one engine to another brand (olds to chevy, etc) is illegal unless it came there factory that same year, and it still must meet that same years emissions requirements. But as long as you keep the same engine type (family) it is legal. So a 403 is legal, and with some convincing, a 455 is too. I don't know the details of NJ's laws.


Lots of good advice here, except for borrowing somebody else's sticker.

At 133K miles don't spend anytime or money at 133K that small block is ready for a redo. Doing just a valve job on your engine, with that kind of miles it will only smoke more after the work is done. Here's why, if you tighten up the top end it, guides, stems, valves, valve seats the engine will just suck oil around the rings more than it is now because the top end is tighter than the bottom end.

If this were my car I'd pull the engine and have it rebuilt or locate a long block to replace that engine.

Amsoil is good oil but its not miracle oil...I'm an Amsoil delaer and I use this all the time and have yet to see an Amsoil oil change fix a worn out engine. It will do some other things, like clean the inside of your engine top to bottom, remove alot of varnish and sludge and stop or slow down oil leaks but it won't turn the odo back.

BTW, just so you won't be surprised a rebuilt engine will smoke a little for the first 500 to 1000 until the rings seat.

Good luck.

VV

DopeStar 156
06-08-06, 02:44 PM
Are you serious?! An engine rebuild?!

N0DIH
06-08-06, 02:46 PM
If it is rings, yes. If it is heads, no, just pull them and fix, if just stem seals, replace on the car itself. Rings though can be just R&R, but it isn't that simple to do and you need to resize the rods then. It is just more involved.

DopeStar 156
06-08-06, 03:01 PM
If it is rings, yes. If it is heads, no, just pull them and fix, if just stem seals, replace on the car itself. Rings though can be just R&R, but it isn't that simple to do and you need to resize the rods then. It is just more involved.
Wait what? Haha! Dumb it down for me.... Rings? Heads? How are those related to the "valve job" I've been told? :hmm:

N0DIH
06-08-06, 06:14 PM
Well, the pistons are the thingys that move up and down.... They are connected to the crankshaft, that is the thingy that goes roundy roundy and is connected to the transmission....

Seriously though!

The rings are on the pistons, and they have to have the block removed (well, you CAN do it in the block, but I won't do it again...) and the engine on a stand. In reality, I have done a few engines, it is fun. But the costs can get up there. And for $1700, that is hard to beat. Now, a local yard here used to sell 307's for around $125 running. But they cleaned up and have nothing now.

Destroyer
06-08-06, 10:24 PM
Are you serious?! An engine rebuild?!
All you need to do is the valve guide seals if that is indeed the source of the problem. If its the rings..........might as well do the whole motor IMO. I've done rings with the motor in the car, royal PITA and not a job for someone like yourself. The labor would be very high cost hence the reccomendation for a new motor. If all it needs is the valve guide seals I'd say you could get them done for a few hundred bucks. :stirpot:

DopeStar 156
06-09-06, 01:03 AM
All you need to do is the valve guide seals if that is indeed the source of the problem. If its the rings..........might as well do the whole motor IMO. I've done rings with the motor in the car, royal PITA and not a job for someone like yourself. The labor would be very high cost hence the reccomendation for a new motor. If all it needs is the valve guide seals I'd say you could get them done for a few hundred bucks. :stirpot:
Oh ok. Thanks. It is definitely the valve guide seals I've been told by a few people because of how it smokes. The smoking occurs when I'm on the gas, if I let up it'll smoke for a few seconds then stop. It never smokes when idling. It's also definitely oil smoke. I know of a few places that I can check prices on valve jobs since I've only got a price from one place. I know a guy near my girlfriend's house who might be cheaper, and my girlfriend's dad's best friend he grew up with owns a shop, he might help me out a little on labor rates. I've got a few options.....

Broughamadrosis
06-09-06, 02:14 PM
You should really get another professional opinion or two as to the cause of the smoke - if it's just valve seals, a valve job would be money wasted (IIRC, this is not your daily driver?)

How much smoke are we talking about? - little puffs, or neighborhood mosquito control?

In the meantime, this might be worth a try for sticker's sake...
Change the oil and filter - use the "higher mileage" oil (supposedly treats/softens seals) - use 20-50 weight (thicker oil won't seep by the seals as rapidly) and a bottle of Lucas Oil Treatment. - If it's visible smoke that they see - you can test this out for yourself, and you'll be the first to know if it works - might take a little time and some miles for it to be effective.
I know this isn't the first suggestion in the thread, but this combo has worked for me.

If you notice a reduction in the smoke, take it for good ride to clear out any oil residues in the exhaust system, as this can sometimes effect what the sniffer sees.

Did they scrape the current sticker? (Mass sticks on a REJECT sticker)
If you still have the original - try a different inspection station - worth a shot, I've found that if the guy with the scaper digs your ride, sometimes little things get overlooked ;)

Best of luck with this!

DopeStar 156
06-10-06, 03:46 AM
Ya know what...... I'm gonna do that.... I'm gonna ghange the oil and give it another shot. I currently have 10-W-30 in there, what do you suggest I switch it with?

Broughamadrosis
06-10-06, 05:04 AM
My favorite is Castrol HIGH MILEAGE 20W-50, but any brand should do the trick, as long as it's the high-mileage/older car formula, and 20-50 weight.
Don't forget the Lucas Additive :) (or equivalent "motor-honey" that promises to reduce smoke) all this and new filter should be available at WalMart...

DopeStar 156
06-10-06, 10:10 AM
My favorite is Castrol HIGH MILEAGE 20W-50, but any brand should do the trick, as long as it's the high-mileage/older car formula, and 20-50 weight.
Don't forget the Lucas Additive :) (or equivalent "motor-honey" that promises to reduce smoke) all this and new filter should be available at WalMart...
Thanks a lot. Monday I have the day off, I'll shoot to do this then probably. I hope this works!!!!! :D

DopeStar 156
06-10-06, 02:34 PM
Now that I think of it, are there any negative effects of running such a high viscosity engine oil in an engine that calls for 5-W-30? (I put 10 normally) Especially in the summertime where the temperatures can go as high here in NJ as the mid 80's? Wouldn't the engine work harder with the thicker oil?

Broughamadrosis
06-10-06, 04:51 PM
No! - thicker is better in the summer. :thumbsup:
The pondwater known as 5W-30 was specified by the mfg's to increase gas mileage. I've seen thicker vodka ;)

20W-50 is excellent in the summer when temps are warm, especially on a "broken-in" engine that has greater clearances. In the Fall you can change it again with 10W-30 or 10W-40. I run 20W-50 in all the cars - 1 MPG (or less?) is far outweighed by the superior protection of the 20W-50 - read on...

A buddy of mine was a Castrol engineer, and he explained something interesting about motor oils and oil breakdown. The viscosity range of motor oil is a single weight in base form. Additives are what give it a multi-grade - the wider the range, the more chemicals are required. In chemist-speak, the wider the range, the longer the "molecule chain". Longer molecule chains are more prone to breakdown, and have a shorter life.

All the xW-30, xW-40 oils start with the same base stock. The 20W-50 starts from a thicker base-stock, which is inherently more durable and resistant to breakdown, and requires less additives to get the multi range, i.e. - a shorter molecule chain than any of the lesser ranges, and subsequently more robust, longer lasting, more temp resistant, and can take a lickin' and keep on tickin'... :hammer:

Another fun fact is that if you mix grades, they average-out. 20W-50 is a little too thick for our VT winters, so I run 3 qt of 5W-30, and 2 qt of 20W-50, which nets a 11W-38 (the lower number is the oil's relative viscosity at 0 degrees F, and the high is at 210F). This gives me a couple of qts of the "good stuff" while keeping the cold number low. But at the first sign of Spring, I go back to all 20W-50

Okay kids, this concludes todays lesson :D
Go change your oil...

Destroyer
06-10-06, 11:55 PM
Now that I think of it, are there any negative effects of running such a high viscosity engine oil in an engine that calls for 5-W-30? (I put 10 normally) Especially in the summertime where the temperatures can go as high here in NJ as the mid 80's? Wouldn't the engine work harder with the thicker oil?You can try but doing the valve seals isnt that big a deal. You dont need a whole valve job. Any competent mechanic can do it for not a whole lot of money and then you dont have to worry about it..........that is, if its is indeed the valve seals and not rings.

DopeStar 156
06-11-06, 01:32 AM
20W-50 it is then! My friend also tells me there's an additive that guarentees to stop oil smoke. Can't argue with a guarentee....

BluEyes
06-11-06, 12:01 PM
If it's that additive that tells you to let it drain into the engine overnight because it is thicker than the proverbial molasses in January, I wouldn't even put it in the trunk of my car, never mind the engine! 20W-50 is plenty thick, no need to make it thicker.

I'd go with 5W-40 oil at least for winter. It has the heavier weight when warm, but the 5W will give you good oil flow on cold winter mornings which is very kind on the bearings.

As a note, _W-30 oil isn't a new development due to fuel economy. The FSM for my '70 calls for 10W-30 as the preferred oil. As an engine is built with tighter tolerances, it needs thinner oil to better flow through the smaller bearing gaps. If properly cared for with regular oil changes, the bearings hardly wear at all, even over many thousands of miles. If oils had been as good back then as they are now, I have no doubt that Cadillac engineers would have reccomended 5W-30 then as well because the lower weight when cold improves cold start lubrication and engine life.

DopeStar 156
06-12-06, 12:47 AM
I got a hell of a deal at Autozone, I'm really happy. I got 5 Quarts of Castrol GTX High Mileage 20W-50, an additive called No Leak that has a money back guarentee after 200 miles, no smoke, no leaks after one treatment, the lady at AZ said it was the best stuff to get. It's a good one, not the crap BluEyes mentioned. And because I bought 5 quarts of any Castrol oil, I got an STP filter for free. I walked outta there spending only $25. I'm very much in love with that place now. Tomorrow I'm gonna change the oil. :D

N0DIH
06-12-06, 05:15 PM
If you must use a 20W50 (I do not recommend! GM voids warranties for it, 20W50 has too many additives that cause ring deposits, causing, you guessed it, burning oil....),If you must use a 20W50, use a RACING 20W50, not a plain 20W50. Like Valvoline Racing 20W50. Or Lucas 20W50, or Redline 20W50, or Amsoil 20W50.

And your car does not recommend 5W30 above 60F or so. I would never run 5W30 in warmer climates. That might be why your car is burning oil at such a young age.

Remember, the film strength of synthetics may be your saving grace, not just going to a thicker oil. That is why I recommend synthetics on it. This is one of those rare cases that might really NEED synthetics.

I would go max out, 50 weight or 60 weight synthetic and see if you can get it to pass. Then if it goes, and you don't wanna run it, dump it out into a jug and save it for next years smog test....


20W-50 it is then! My friend also tells me there's an additive that guarentees to stop oil smoke. Can't argue with a guarentee....

The Ape Man
06-12-06, 09:51 PM
I know this isn't the first suggestion in the thread, but this combo has worked for me.


Strange to see this thread go so far before someone actually suggested a heavier weight engine oil.

DopeStar 156
06-13-06, 01:10 AM
I dropped in the GTX Hi Mi 20W50, and added the Stop Leak. SO far the consumption seems to have stopped. I went 100 miles today and i don't see a drop missing off the dipstick. If I end up getting the valid sticker I'm curious if I should continue to run the 20W50 in there or go back to the 10W30?

N0DIH
06-13-06, 11:41 AM
I recommended the 60 weight early on.... Amsoil is one of the only ones that you can get it easily in synthetic, that is why I recommended it. Racing oils aren't recommended on the street for normal driving due to a very different additive package.


Strange to see this thread go so far before someone actually suggested a heavier weight engine oil.

DopeStar 156
06-13-06, 01:34 PM
SUCCESS! This morning I started the car up after driving 100 miles yesterday and wailed on the accelerator, no smoke, none at all. I'm gonna go for my reinspection tomorrow. I'm wondering if I should go back to the 10W30 and just keep adding the Stop Leak every oil change. Sound like a good idea? I think I'll just keep the 20W50 in there until it's time for my next oil change. I'm still getting the valve job done but now I can hold off until I really have the money. For now I'd just like to stop the oil consumption between now and the valve job.

N0DIH
06-13-06, 02:47 PM
What does the smog tester say?? That is the real test.....

If it works, keep it in. No need to swap. But GM don't like 20W50 at all.