: Douglas DC-3....



Night Wolf
03-03-06, 12:31 AM
Well, this is perhaps my favorite all around aircraft.... its just very hard to not like it....

And I came across this... alot of them I knew already, some I didn't... still though, its good stuff.... The first 8 facts are by far the best :).

http://www.douglasdc3.com/amaze/amaze.htm

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Buried for months in snow on a glacier in Iceland, a C-47 was abandoned by the Air Force as hopelessly unsalvageable. But the owners of Icelandic Airlines dug it out and flew it home - on engines and batteries still able to operate after the long freeze.


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Military DC-3's (C-47's) were a hardy lot. In World War II, a Japanese kamikaze pilot tried to shoot one down, then, unable to do so, rammed it. The kamikaze crashed; the undaunted C-47, with a gaping hole in the mid upper fuselage, shorn of much of its cabin, merely shrugged and staggered on home, a bit drafty but safe.


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In another wartime skirmish, a Japanese Zero colided with a C-47, slicing off most of its rudder. The Zero plunged to earth, while the tailless C-47 managed to wallow back to base, being officially credited with an enemy "kill" by downing the hapless Zero.


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A mid-air collision clipped 5 feet from one wing of a Capital Airlines DC-3, yet its pilot brought it down reasonably intact, its passengers and crew safe.


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A C-47 ran out of fuel with all its crew bailing out, only to learn later that the aircraft had landed gently all by itself in a meadow several miles from were the crew had deserted her.


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A Chinese DC-3 grounded because of engine trouble, was strafed by five Japanese fighters that out more than 3,000 bullet holes in its wings and fuselage. Its engines more or less repaired and the bullet holes patched with canvas and improvised glue, the plane took off and ran into a heavy rainstorm. The engines were running roughly, belching out huge streaks of blue and orange flame. The rain washed away the cobbled-up bullet hole patches, setting up a loud eerie whistling noise as the aircraft staggered homeward. A patrol of six enemy fighters jumped the stricken transport, but suddenly broke off the attack without firing a single shot. Safely down, the planes crew monitored a Tokyo broadcast that described a new Allied secret weapon that "spouts streams of flame and screeches in horrible tones as it flies.


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Designed to carry a maximum of no more than 30 passengers, one C-47 in Burma during the war somehow managed to board a total of 74, including the then-Lt Col. Jimmy Doolittle, who was enroute home from his famous bombing raid on Tokyo.


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In Brazil, a DC-3 once wallowed into the air with 93 flood victims aboard, a feat that effectively contradicts aerodynamic principles as basic as two and two equals four.


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500,000 rivets were used in the DC-3. If the rivets were laid end to end, they would cover more than three miles long.


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3,600 blueprints were used for the making of the DC-3 and if laid on the floor, they would cover approximately 28,000 square feet.


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The total length of control cables for a DC-3 is over half a mile long.


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The lighting system of each DC-3 plane was sufficient to light an eight room house. More than 90 lights were used in each plane. 1,517 watts are required. To light an ordinary room in those days only 100 watts was required.


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Approximately 6,000 men and women were employed in building a DC-3.


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Material used for sound insulation in the DC-3 and the DST "Sleeper" weighed 240 pounds. Blankets and mattresses weighed another 195 pounds.


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3,900 feet of tubing, 8,000 feet of wire and approximately 13,300 square feet of sheet metal were used in the construction of each DC-3.


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The heating and ventilation used in the DC-3 dispensed 1,000 cubic feet of air per minute on a warm day. As it took a little more than 15 hours to fly from Los Angeles to New York, 900,000 cubic feet of air passed through the cabin or 60,000 to 75,000 pounds of air were utilized on the trip, depending on the altitude flown.


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More than 120,000 BTUs were delivered to the cabin of a DC-3 on a cold day. On a flight to NY from LA, 1,800,000 BTUs were delivered during the 15 hours the plane was in the air. The boiler weighed 17 pounds and evaporated 15 gallons of water an hour. Approximately 225 gallons of water were evaporated from LA to NY. Only six quarts of water are carried in the heating system where it was continuously evaporated and condensed.


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A radiator capable of heating air from 4 degrees F. to 200 degrees F. was installed in every DC-3. The air passed through the radiator at a speed of 3,000 feet a minute and since the radiator was only a foot long it took only 1/50 of a second to heat the air from 4 to 200 degrees. The radiator weighed 36 pounds.


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Heating a DC-3 in the air was the equivalent of heating a building in a 200 mph wind at a 35 degree outside temperature


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Approximately 700,000 parts were used in the construction of the DC-3. This is exclusive of instruments and engine parts and exclusive also of the 500,000 rivets used on each plane.


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The engines powering the DC-3 weighed 1,275 pounds each or a total of 2,550 pounds. This weight alone is a striking contrast to the payload available on some of the early airmail planes flown which was around 250 pounds.


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At a cruise speed of 180 mph at 10,000 feet each engine developed 550 hp Ninety-one gallons of fuel were used each hour giving approximately 2 miles per gallon.


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Sometime between February and July of 1957 a commercial DC-3 pilot took his passengers sight seeing near Phoenix, AZ. He got up close and personal with a mountain side--a bit too close and too personal. He brushed the mountain side and took of the left wing tip outboard of the outboard aileron hinge. The Gooney Bird landed minus the wing tip and with an embarrased pilot.

Stoneage_Caddy
03-03-06, 01:29 AM
yup , ever read about the shape b24s and b17s came home in ?

youll never see the sort of enginnering again that took place in all feilds like we did from 1935-1969

Night Wolf
03-03-06, 02:33 AM
Heh....

speaking of the B-17....

at the hanger a B-25 flew in, a B-17 was supposed to come in with it, but they said the engine was spitting out metal in flight and they had to turn back... so only the B-25 came.

Since we were right there, we were able to go right up to it, all the bays and stuff were open.... it was $1, lol... sweet plane...

it was the Tondelayo....

http://www.megavision.net/tondelayo/page3.html

http://www.warbirdalley.com/images/Tondelayo.jpg

fully restored, origanal bomber paint scheme, carbon trails down the side from the exhaust and leaking hydrolic fluid at the gear... it was a site to be seen.... very cool plane.

Stuff was just over engineered... not like today with computers and stuff to look pretty.... but good old classic built tough. Shoot it up and it keeps going.

Katshot
03-03-06, 08:39 AM
Damn, I wish I had my B-17 pictures here at work! I had taken a flight in a B-17 a couple years ago and it was one of the greatest things I've ever done. Being an aircraft enthusiast, and considering my background in aviation, I was extrememly excited about the flight. I got some great pictures too. I'll post them once I get home. Until then, here's a great website if you want to se battle damaged B-17's. You REALLY get the feeling that they were one tough bird!

http://www.daveswarbirds.com/b-17/contents.htm

noahsdad
03-03-06, 11:12 AM
At Luis Muniz Marin airport in San Jaun, there are about a dozen DC-3s sitting near the main terminal. Owned by a company called Tol-Air, I'm told the serviceable ones see frequent use as inter-island commuter planes.

http://photos.airliners.net/photos/middle/4/9/4/0549494.jpg

http://photos.airliners.net/photos/middle/5/0/7/0009705.jpg

If you really want to fly on a classic prop plane though, it's gotta be a Connie!

http://www.airlinehistorymuseum.com/images/Bowen01b.jpg

The most graceful, stylish passenger plane ever built! I flew in the cockpit jumpseat of this one, the L-1049G from Save-A-Connie museum in Kansas City, on a trip from Muskegon, Michigan to KC downtown airport in 1999. The experience later was transformed into two articles on Constellations I wrote for Fly Past Magazine and Flight Journal. Unforgettable.

Katshot
03-03-06, 11:23 AM
AHHH the Constellation. You're right. When I was in the Navy, the last (supposedly) operable Super Constellation was rebuilt at our base (NAS Patuxent River, MD). I was there the day they fired her up and flew her out to a museum on the west coast. There were tears in our eyes during the whole thing. A VERY memorable moment indeed.

Elvis
03-03-06, 11:42 AM
I actually had to fly on a commercial DC3 once from Minneapolis to LaCrosse, WI. No A/C, and the upholstery on the seats was probably vintage 1948. Not bad once we were airborne.

PAW 47
03-03-06, 12:10 PM
I've flown in a couple of AT-6's. I love vintage planes.. I'm saving up for a trip in a P-51 couple of hours costs about $2800 bucks..

Night Wolf
03-03-06, 12:51 PM
Damn, I wish I had my B-17 pictures here at work! I had taken a flight in a B-17 a couple years ago and it was one of the greatest things I've ever done. Being an aircraft enthusiast, and considering my background in aviation, I was extrememly excited about the flight. I got some great pictures too. I'll post them once I get home. Until then, here's a great website if you want to se battle damaged B-17's. You REALLY get the feeling that they were one tough bird!

http://www.daveswarbirds.com/b-17/contents.htm

Wow, thats a great site! I like to see the battle damaged planes that made it back.... any other sites like that?

Night Wolf
03-03-06, 01:06 PM
I too love the vintage planes.... It makes me very glad I chose aviation as a carrer.... nearly became a pilot in HS (which I WILL finish) and currently going for my A&P license.

Since the chance of me ever owning, say a DC-3 is very slim for the obvious reasons... I still would like a vintage plane... and I have always been partial to Cessna when it comes to single engine planes.


tail dragger, fabric wings.... its perhaps the most graceful plane to come from Cessna. The swept-back fuseladge and the rounded off elevators and rubber.... for such a small and basic plane, it just had so much presence. These things are cheap too, cheap to buy and very cheap to run. One day when I am stable with money and housing, I'd like to buy one... even if I restore it myself, which I'll be certified to do, I would really like to own one.

http://www.air-and-space.com/20050617%20Victorville/DSC_1890%20Cessna%20140%20N2311N%20left%20side%20i n%20flight%20l.jpg

http://www.lunabase.org/~faber/Flying/seattle03/images/cessna_140.jpg

http://grzegorz.aksamit.org/usa/c140/C_140_ME.JPG

The airframe was so light, it made very effective use of the 85hp engine.

Obviosuly not the best plane to fly cross country, but thats not really what I would want to do.... I still really like it.

The Connie.... a sweet plane as well, I'll agree with the above points, it was the luxury plane of yesteryear.... the DC-3 was the work truck of the skies, the git er' done and come home safe plane.

Ranger
03-03-06, 01:07 PM
I think those all qualify as "Tough Old Birds".

EcSTSatic
03-03-06, 01:37 PM
They were still in use when I was in the Marines. The C-47 were used as gunships in Vietnam. One nickname was "Spooky". The tracer lines coming from them were awesome. Today they have been replaced by C130s with even more firepower and HUD.

dbdartman
03-03-06, 02:37 PM
Douglas DC-3....

Ahhhh.... a subject near & dear to my heart. I think I can safely say that I've flown on more DC-3's than anyone else here. Between 1985 & 1994, I've probably been on 8 or 10 different ones (both DC-3 & C-47), including an original right-hand-door Eastern Airlines plane! Another memorable plane was the DC-4 (this one was a C-54) I flew on in Az in '86. I could actually stand up straight in the 4!!

Back in about 1992, in celebration of the DC-3's 50th birthday, I saw an article from one of the avaiation mags reprinted in Parachutist mag. Some of the stories told were incredable:

An old, "worn out" DC-3 was ditched in the ocean after the pilot bailed out. The plane hit the ocean, bounced 50' back into the air & continued on flying out of sight. One was crashed in the jungles of Brazil & one wing was almost totally gone. Another wing was packed to the crash sight, remains of the old wing removed, new wing rivited on, runway hacked out of the jungle & the plane wa flown out. There were more stories, but time (& some judicious partying) has faded the the old memory.

An amazing sight was the flightline at Quincy, Il. in 1986, there were SEVEN DC-3/C-47's that year (including the aforementioned right-hand-door 3, called "Silver Bullit").

Attached is a couple pics of the flightline at Deland Fla, 1985 Easter boogie. First is some of the 3's, second is myself & 4 friends rolling a "tube" out of Mr. Douglass (aka Mr. Jugless). I'm in the blue jumpsuit with red stripes. Note video being shot from the escape hatch. Mr. D had steps & handles around the door so you could get 4 or 5 people outside the plane, comfortably!

http://dbdartman.moparts.com/pic/flightlinedeland85.jpg
http://dbdartman.moparts.com/pic/delandtube85.jpg

Katshot
03-03-06, 02:47 PM
I too love the vintage planes.... It makes me very glad I chose aviation as a carrer.... nearly became a pilot in HS (which I WILL finish) and currently going for my A&P license.

Since the chance of me ever owning, say a DC-3 is very slim for the obvious reasons... I still would like a vintage plane... and I have always been partial to Cessna when it comes to single engine planes.


tail dragger, fabric wings.... its perhaps the most graceful plane to come from Cessna. The swept-back fuseladge and the rounded off elevators and rubber.... for such a small and basic plane, it just had so much presence. These things are cheap too, cheap to buy and very cheap to run. One day when I am stable with money and housing, I'd like to buy one... even if I restore it myself, which I'll be certified to do, I would really like to own one.

The airframe was so light, it made very effective use of the 85hp engine.

Obviosuly not the best plane to fly cross country, but thats not really what I would want to do.... I still really like it.

The Connie.... a sweet plane as well, I'll agree with the above points, it was the luxury plane of yesteryear.... the DC-3 was the work truck of the skies, the git er' done and come home safe plane.

A&P license huh? I got mine right before I got out of the Navy. I thought I'd get that and then come out and get a job at an airport or something. Problem came when I found out that most of those jobs were night jobs. That just wasn't an option for me so I dropped the whole thing and went into the automotive industry instead.

noahsdad
03-03-06, 03:53 PM
I just remembered the Kansas City gang is restoring a 1941 vintage DC-3 in original TWA colors (bright skin, red letters). This is one of the most thorough restorations of a '3 ever - and it's gonna be flyable!

http://www.airlinehistorymuseum.com/images/Dcp_2106.jpg


Check the website (lots of pics) http://www.airlinehistorymuseum.com/dc-3.htm

All vintage aviation enthusiasts should visit to this museum if you get the chance. Kansas City used to be the hub of TWA, and most of the people in the museum are retired airline personnel. Nicest bunch you could ever meet, and man do they have the memorabilia.

Any of you guys ever get to Oshkosh?

noahsdad
03-03-06, 04:00 PM
Comment by Lindbergh on the DC-3

"Gentlest, yet most rugged aircraft I've ever known, but she yaws somewhat with the flaps down. No, make that staggers like a drunken ballerina."

If you've ever seen one of these on a short strip approach, you know what he's talking about!

Florian
03-04-06, 12:20 AM
love those old goonies....theres one for sale sitting at a local airfield. I get all teary every time I drive by. What a great plane.


F

Night Wolf
03-04-06, 01:00 AM
Anyway, speaking of some old birds....

A guy bought a Beechcraft 18. It was know as the C-45 in the minitary. This particular plane did recon and transport work durring the wars, then NASA got it and used it for some of their stuff.

Well, this guy that bought it fully restored the plane including the WWII paint job. One of the first times he took it out, not to fly, but for high speed taxi runs, the brakes failed and he coudln't stop the plane.... and took a little trip *into* Tampa Bay, where the plane sat for atleast 24 hours.

They pulled it out, the bottom of the wings were trashed, and the fuseladge on the left side has some damage where it was pushed up against some rocks. There is also damage to the landing gear.

The guy started to fix it, but then stopped, I guess he got insurance money from it, then decided to donate it.....

to National Aviation Academy..... my school :).

It has twin Pratt & Whitney R-985 Wasp Junior....985 cubic inch 9 cylinder 450hp radials.... it'll be our first radial engine aircraft. My class (since we move in stages) is going to be doing lots and lots of sheet metal work in the future, we won't be doing much on the engines, but I know I'd like to volunteer alot of my time, if given the option... to work on those radials.... I love engines.

We got the plane 2 days ago, I haven't seen it yet, as my class hasn't gone to the hanger yet. Tomorrow (Saturday) is an open house... everything is open to the public, so I am going to go, check out the Beech and get lots of pics of everything with my digital camera. I am really excited to see this plane.

This is the Beechcraft 18/C-45:

http://www.zap16.com/lelystad%202004/ley04%20Beechcraft%20D18S%20G-29%20PH-KHV%202.jpg

http://www.pilotfriend.com/aircraft%20performance/march2004/beech18.jpg

http://membres.lycos.fr/wings2/3vues/c45f_3v.jpg

I already know this plane passed up the early 60's Cessna 310H (with new paint job) as my favorite plane there.

So our planes at the hanger are as follows:

Beechcraft 18
Piper Cherokee 140
Piper Cherokee 140
Cessna 310H
Aero Commander 520
Learjet 23
small Bell helicopter

I have heard they may be getting rid of the Aero Commander now because of the Beech.... and for good reason, I can honestly say that plane is a POS. It also had a water landing here in Tampa Bay.... EVERYTHING on the plane is corroded, stuff is literally rotted out (like the whole exhaust system) the engines run ok, but not great.... its just a rough plane. The Learjet is currently a single engine plane as #2 engine kinda blew up.... someone left a wrench in the intake of the engine and they went to start it... no more engine.

None of these plane can ever fly again, once they become a maintenance technition school plane.... so sadly, that Beech will never see active duty... but on the bright side, instead of it corroding away in some field, we got it, we are going to fix it all up, repaint it, and it'll be at the hanger witht he rest of the planes for everyone to see as they pass by, so its not too bad.

I'll get pics of all the planes tomorrow... I have some from my cell phone camera, but they aren't all that great, tomorrow I bring the Toshiba digi cam :).

Katshot
03-04-06, 08:47 AM
Almost forgot to post some pics of my B-17 flight! Here you go....:)

noahsdad
03-04-06, 10:47 AM
Almost forgot to post some pics of my B-17 flight! Here you go....:)


Awesome Kat - love the bombardier shot - what a ride that must have been!

Night Wolf
03-04-06, 12:58 PM
Almost forgot to post some pics of my B-17 flight! Here you go....:)

SWEET!

Night Wolf
03-04-06, 10:30 PM
Well, we got the Beech in! What a sweet plane... I really like it and look forward to getting to work on it.

I got a good amount of pictures of the planes and hanger too....

Here is the inside of the Beech.... pretty much standard fare for a light transport ~1952.

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1245.JPG

The tail is pretty cool

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1247.JPG

late 50's/early 60's Cessna 310H. New lightning bolt paint job, it looks really nice, I really like this plane. Twin geared Contential 6-cylinder engines... 485CID IIRC at ~230hp each... very nice plane. This particular plane had a partial landing gear collaspe... the women made a left turn too fast off the runway, the right gear collasped, prop strike on the right engine (it still runs ok though... prop replaced) it caused damage to the right wing and right horizontal stabalizer... besides the damaged wing spars and creased sheet metal (which will be fixed) this plane is in pretty nice shape.

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1248.JPG

Wingless Beech. Also out first tail dragger...

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1249.JPG

control tower for the Clearwater/St. Pete Int'l airport.

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1250.JPG

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1251.JPG

parked planes.... beyond them is the runway..... the Coast Guard with their C-130's are always flying in here. The Clearwater airport is the largest single Coast Guard base in the US... that pretty cool... besides that, this place is kinda dead.

more planes...

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1252.JPG

Beech

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1253.JPG

Night Wolf
03-04-06, 10:30 PM
heres an engine :) twin Pratt & Whitney R-985... Wasp Junior. 450hp each.... pretty sweet if you ask me :).

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1254.JPG

late 50's Aero Commander 520....this plane also had a water landing in Tampa Bay... the whole thing is corroded pretty bad.... I've heard they are going to be getting rid of it since the Beech came in, though not positive. This plane has 2 different engines.... one is a Lycoming GSO-480, the other is a Lycoming GSO-435.... same family though. GSO= Geared, Supercharged, Opposed, then the cubic inch displacement. I know the 480 is 260hp, not sure on the 435

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1255.JPG

Piper Cherokee 140, I'd say early 60's. Lycoming O-320 4banger.... ~150hp. A bit bigger plane and more power then the Cessna 152 I flew... The Piper is a nice plane, but I am partial to Cessna when with the single engine planes. Not sure why we have this... it was probably just donated as a tax write off as its not worth all that much.

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1256.JPG

The 310... nice plane. Cessna engineers designed the points on the wing tip tanks to be right at head level... when it is in the hanger, its tight on space sometimes, you gotta be careful you don't run into it.

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1257.JPG

Learjet

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1258.JPG

Cessna

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1259.JPG

The Piper twins, both Cherokee 140's Even more cool are the tail numbers "77 Whiskey" and "66 Whisky" Not sure why the other Cherokee is here either... probably just didn't want it anymore.

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1260.JPG

Aero Commander again

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1261.JPG

Night Wolf
03-04-06, 10:32 PM
Learjet 23... the first production Learjet. This particular plane had a cockpit fire, was fixed, flown again.... then for whatever reason donated to the school. It was painted (by the school) the very cool "millenium" paint job... I like it alot. Both engines used to run, but #2 indgested a wrench and, well... dosn't work anymore. When this plane it opened up and I stay around the hanger for lunch break, or if we are smply done with our stuff and nothing more to do... its the best place to take a nap. The interior, or atleast the seats were re done in 1991 (sticker on the bottom of the seat) though its now worn, the leather is so very comfortable... makes the leather in my Caddy really look like vinyl. The one recliner seat is broke, so it kinda lays all the way back and makes a perfect bed... very comfy :).

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1262.JPG

old Bell helicopter....I don't really like whirly birds... only thing cool about this is the 6-cylinder Franklin engine, because it sounds like a muscle car :).

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1263.JPG

old school Learjet :)

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1264.JPG

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1265.JPG

inside.... the seat on the right, though folded over right now... is the really comfortable one for taking a nap :)

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1266.JPG

Night Wolf
03-04-06, 10:34 PM
So this plane has the couch in the back, the recliner and the single seat across from the door. I am sure it made some rich CEO very happy in its day .

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1267.JPG

wing tip tank

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1268.JPG

#1 engine. For a little turbine, this thing is damn loud when they do run ups with it. I heard the 23 was the most noisy Learjet inside, in flight... ah well.

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1269.JPG

#2 engine after a wrench went thru it

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1271.JPG


left wing to the Beech... in pretty good shape, the bottom is dented up a bit, but not too bad.

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1272.JPG

little 65/85hp contentials used for run ups and trouble shooting.

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1273.JPG

right wing to the Beech, not in as good shape. My term will be doing alot of sheet metal repair on this later on in the course.

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1274.JPG

like a tin can...

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1275.JPG

The Beech... they were in the process of getting the cowling back on. A really nice plane.

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1276.JPG

last picture.... the nice high-T tail of the Lear... and the chopper.

http://inoventionseast.com/aviation/hanger/PDR_1277.JPG

This.... is what my tech school consist of... not too shabby... though alot of the time is spent back at the school taking notes, still not bad, and for me, far better then a typical college.

*Didn't mean to hi-jack my own thread*

Florian
03-04-06, 11:51 PM
that Lear is a toilet......too bad, they are missiles..


F

Night Wolf
03-04-06, 11:54 PM
that Lear is a toilet......too bad, they are missiles..


F

ya lost me there :).

Katshot
03-05-06, 08:49 AM
Yeah, the B-17 flight was one the coolest things I've ever done. It really meant a lot to me. It was amazing how smooth it was. Really loved being able to look out the observation hole.
Next up, I'm taking a flight in an open-cockpit biplane. Probably next month. I just have to schedule it.

Night Wolf
03-05-06, 12:55 PM
Heh, back in NY, very close to me was the Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome, one of the first antique airplane mesums, grass strip... it was really cool. They have a bi-plane and offer bi-plane rides... so a long time ago I did it.

http://www.oldrhinebeck.org/

Here is the plane:

http://www.oldrhinebeck.org/collection/airplanes/New%20Standard%20D-25%20(no.%202).htm

One of the really cool times with that plane, well, I wasn't in that plane, I was in our 152 doing traffic pattern work, and the bi-plane was landing at Kingston, they didn't have a radio, so we picked up the radio in the Cessna and were calling out their location and stuff, that was neat.

Well, here in FL there is Fantasy of Flight.... I heard very cool things about it, I think its even better then the Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome.... anyway, our class, this Wednesday is going there, and they too have open cockpit bi-plane rides.... we are gettign a reduced group rate, and I am going to be going for the ride as well... very cool.

http://fantasyofflight.com/

LOL, I just saw this... what a chance... the bi-plane they use for rides at FOF is the same exact plane as the Aerodrome... a 1929 New Standard D-25...heh.

http://fantasyofflight.com/new_standard.html