: Torque Steer in FWD Cadillacs??



Chuck C
01-05-04, 10:38 PM
I am looking for a good description of torque steer as I have heard this is a problem with most FWD cars. From some definitions I found, torque steer is defined as the tendency for a car to pull to the left or right when accelerating. What does the definition assume? Are the effects of torque steer felt from rest or while accelerating into a turn? Are there any videos that demonstrate torque steer? Finally, does my eldo suffer from torque steer and I just haven't been observant all these years?

thanks for the help!

DaveSmed
01-05-04, 10:51 PM
Torque steer is where a FWD car tries to steer itself upon hard acceleration. Your Eldo is pretty good about controlling torque steer, but to get an idea of what it is, find a large empty parking lot. Take your hands off of the wheel and accelerate rapidly.. You'll find that the car pulls pretty hard in the direction it feels like going. (you should hear how bad Shadowlvr400's car is, he says when it launches, it tries to yank the wheel out of his hand) Torque steer is very prelevant on cars with unequal legenth CV axles. Very common on some early FWD cars. With the unequal axle legenth, it magnified the effects, and made some 4 cylinders worse than your V-8 in that regard.

Ralph
01-05-04, 10:55 PM
I have been on ice even today with my FWD Caddy, and I am happy to report there is NO torquesteer. I know all too well what it is and usually it is caused by unequal length driveshafts in FWD cars. My FWD Pontiac is an example of bad torque steer. Upon accellerating from a green light (going straight) it would immediately shift the weight of the car to the right toward the pedistrians!! (I am talking of icy conditions) After scaring several people, I learned that you have to have a light foot in adverse weather conditions, as this is sort of obvious anyway. I believe newer cars have addressed this problem, for the most part.

Stoneage_Caddy
01-06-04, 12:43 PM
tq steer , remeber how rear drive cars without posi light up one tire when you lay into it ?
kinda the same thing here , as with any open differetial the torque going to each wheel is not equalized. So front drive on acceleration one front wheel will have most of the torque
going to it . That wheel will steer the car in that opposite direction as that wheel will be trying to go faster than the wheel with almost no torque applied to it .

ex the right wheel has 75% of the engine torque applied to it , the car will try to dart left

yup equal lenth half shafts and a posi type differantial have just about elimated tq steer in front drive cars

but to feel classic torque steer one only has to drive a modded chrysler turbo car

Night Wolf
01-06-04, 09:15 PM
yeah, my DeVille has NO tourqe steer.... I even took myt hands off the wheel one time and floored it, tires spin, but the car went stright.....

....my '89 Olds 88 dosn't have much tourqe steer either....

I remember reading an article online about my DeVille, and they were saying how it has no tourqesteer and in 1993, they coudnl't believe it....

.... my father said his '99 GTP has gobs of tourqe steer.... i drove it, but just around town, never really got to open it up, so I woudln't know....

Chuck C
01-08-04, 06:50 PM
thanks for the great replies...it's good to be the caddy

Steve96STS
01-10-04, 04:22 PM
Both my 96 STS and 00 Nissan Maxima have torque steer. The caddy's isnt too bad but the max has pretty bad torque steer.


-Steve

HotRodSaint
01-10-04, 06:03 PM
Jump on it while making a U-turn or a hard right turn and then taking your hand off the wheel. In a RWD car, you can get yourself out of trouble by letting go of the wheel. In FWD car, you will get into BIG trouble if you let go.

Mr. Curb, meet Mr. Rim!

Stoneage_Caddy
01-10-04, 06:45 PM
"00 Nissan Maxima "

god they have tons of torque steer , those and the 3.5l altimas with the 5 speed , but they are wicked fun arent they ?

MMNineInchNails
01-10-04, 09:33 PM
My mom's honda crv has a little torque steer from a stop on a green, but only when it kinda looses traction a tiny bit going over the painted lines.