: Fwd



Ralph
03-16-03, 05:36 AM
FWD is fine for snow up here in Canada. I just sold my rear-drive Grand Marquis for a Fleetwood FWD. There is a world of difference. There are more parts to fix, however, on a FWD, this can be more costly. I have never broken a CV boot on a rear wheel drive, because they don't have them. RWD is much more reliable. Also there is a horsepower limit to FWD transaxles. Many more new cars that are more powerful are turning back to RWD as evidenced by the new V-8 Impala, the new V-8 Intrepid, etc. Three hundred horsepower is about the limit on most FWD transaxles. Ralph

Katshot
03-16-03, 10:43 AM
I agree with MOST of what you said but, the Impala is staying FWD for now. At least in the US.

jadcock
03-17-03, 10:42 AM
Don't many of the GM vehicles have RWD cousins down in Australia, under the Holden marque? I think the Impala has a RWD version down there. Too bad it isn't available here. I think the new GTO is the first Holden vehicle available here.

jadcock
03-17-03, 10:47 AM
Originally posted by Ralph
FWD is fine for snow up here in Canada. I just sold my rear-drive Grand Marquis for a Fleetwood FWD. There is a world of difference. There are more parts to fix, however, on a FWD, this can be more costly. I have never broken a CV boot on a rear wheel drive, because they don't have them. RWD is much more reliable. Also there is a horsepower limit to FWD transaxles. Many more new cars that are more powerful are turning back to RWD as evidenced by the new V-8 Impala, the new V-8 Intrepid, etc. Three hundred horsepower is about the limit on most FWD transaxles. Ralph

Yep -- FWD vehicles certainly do have their limits as far as power goes. The Sevilles are running about 300 horsepower and 300 lb*ft of torque, and that's about as high as I've seen.

Careful on the CV boots with RWD cars -- many AWD vehicles have CV boots at all four wheels, like some car-based SUVs, Subarus probably, etc. Large RWD with solid axles obviously don't have boots, but modern RWD cars with independent suspensions often have these. I think the boots are getting more reliable than they used to. The boots on all three of my vehicles are original and untouched ('97 Cadillac, 113k; '97 Saturn, 87k; '95 Nissan 4wd, 174k). I used to work at an auto parts store and we sold boots and CV shaft assys for older minivans and small cars all the time. Even with many miles, they seem to be holding up well on newer vehicles.

Dead Sled
03-17-03, 08:15 PM
RWD forever !

Ralph
03-22-03, 04:08 AM
At least in the snow or ice, in a RWD, I could break and steer to avoid something. My old Pontiac FWD, when you locked the brakes, forget steering. Mind you, antilock brakes may have cleaned that up. I have not had my FWD Caddy on snow or ice yet, I wonder how the torque steer is.

jadcock
03-22-03, 10:07 AM
It probably won't be that bad. In any vehicle, FWD or otherwise, you have to be slow and deliberate in the snow. Also in any vehicle, FWD or otherwise, if you lock up the brakes, you don't get steering, period. Anti-lock brakes have improved winter driving saftey 200% in my opinion. I had an '84 Cutlass w/o ABS and my '97 Seville w/ ABS. Trust me -- there is no comparison when driving in the slick stuff.

In one instance, good drivers like us can make use of RWD, with oversteer. Tip the throttle a little bit, and the rear end will slide the way you want it. But as long as you're careful, FWD will take you many more places in the snow than RWD will.

elwesso
03-22-03, 11:43 AM
I like FWD on the snow, thats it. I have gotten stuck a few times, and with RWD its no fun. RWD for me, except in snow!

Ralph
03-23-03, 01:21 AM
I agree guys. The pontiac FWD was so bad for torquesteer that you would almost be on the sidewalk when accellerating from a green light. (even light throttle!) That scared many pedestrians, unintentionally, of course. The driveshafts must be very unequal length.