: Just read a great book.



mccombie_5
02-09-06, 08:36 PM
Dean Koontz, Velocity.

A friend of mine bought it and showed me it, and after reading just the cover I wanted to read it. Apparently she did the same and thats why she bought it!

http://horror.about.com/od/books/gr/bk_velocity.htm

I read it very quickly, and kept me on edge, although I did guess the villain pretty soon. Worth a read for sure.

EcSTSatic
02-09-06, 09:00 PM
I hope you are kidding!!!!:helpless:

DaveDeVille
02-09-06, 09:03 PM
:yeah:

I~LUV~Caddys8792
02-09-06, 09:04 PM
I prefer the book version of the same movie, books are much more descriptive than the movies that get based off the books.

mccombie_5
02-09-06, 09:13 PM
I find reading a great way to relax. It allows the infamous McCombie imagination to develop :p

Honestly, I would rather read a book than watch TV or even a movie, despite being a Film Studies student. Not so many young people agree with me though.

LittleB
02-09-06, 09:15 PM
Reading a book is about the most useless way to waste your time.

Save the books for school. Watch a movie.

You can't be serious...

mccombie_5
02-09-06, 09:21 PM
:Poke:

:rolleyes:

DaveDeVille
02-09-06, 09:21 PM
I need to figure out how to use that ignore feature.

LittleB
02-09-06, 09:21 PM
I need to figure out how to use that ignore feature.

You know what that's a GREAT idea :yup:

mccombie_5
02-09-06, 09:22 PM
I need to figure out how to use that ignore feature.

:thumbsup:

I~LUV~Caddys8792
02-09-06, 09:23 PM
Sal.........

mccombie_5
02-09-06, 09:25 PM
Sal.........

Or Kev... or Elvis..... Or Ian.....? Please?

Spyder
02-09-06, 10:11 PM
Hmmm...I should go fishing...havn't been TROLLING in a while...

mccombie_5
02-09-06, 10:59 PM
Right, so now everythings back to normal, can anyone suggest another book I might like to read, I'm going to go and buy some new ones on Saturday, so if theres anything anyone can suggest?

EcSTSatic
02-09-06, 11:20 PM
Right, so now everythings back to normal, can anyone suggest another book I might like to read, I'm going to go and buy some new ones on Saturday, so if theres anything anyone can suggest?

What are your interests?
For fiction I like Tom Clancy's Jack Ryan series although the last few had a lot of gratuitous smut in them. I guess it sells.
I sail a 26' MacGregor and I also love Patrick O'Brian's Aubrey/Maturin series. "Master and Commander" was based on it. The movie used bits of many of the books, not just one episode.
I also have tried to go back to reading some of the classics, even books like Frankenstein, Ben Hur, Ivanhoe and so on. Hollywood really distorts these great stories.
I read a lot of military history too, but that is my niche.

Elvis
02-09-06, 11:33 PM
James Patterson is really good. I highly recommend The Honeymoon. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0446696269/qid=1139545448/sr=1-5/ref=sr_1_5/104-2749666-9036710?s=books&v=glance&n=283155

Koontz is good, too if you like that stuff. The last one of his I know of is By the Light of the Moon . Gripping and fun. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0553582763/qid=1139545613/sr=1-24/ref=sr_1_24/104-2749666-9036710?s=books&v=glance&n=283155

If you haven't read any John Grisham, you might like that if you can get into American legal drama. I'd recommend starting at the beginning with A Time to Kill. Skip The Firm and The Pelican Brief and go directly to The Client.

The last Grisham book I really liked was The Summons. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0440241073/qid=1139545775/sr=1-12/ref=sr_1_12/104-2749666-9036710?s=books&v=glance&n=283155

Kev
02-09-06, 11:56 PM
Hey, don't forget the classics! Have you read any Dickens? Some of his writing is a bit stuffy but I've always enjoyed Oliver Twist.

Elvis
02-10-06, 12:00 AM
Hey, don't forget the classics! Have you read any Dickens? Some of his writing is a bit stuffy but I've always enjoyed Oliver Twist.

That's probably reqired reading before the 6th grade in the U.K.

Sort of like Dick and Jane "see spot run" here. :histeric:

I~LUV~Caddys8792
02-10-06, 12:39 AM
So what happened to whats his face? I see all his posts got deleted, along with his threads. Good riddance!

eldorado99
02-10-06, 01:52 AM
Elvis swooped in with his magical modly goodness and saved the day by banning him. Thanks again Elvis! :D

LittleB
02-10-06, 02:00 AM
Yeah thanks Elvis...you're the best :D ;) :bouncy: but you already knew that :D....

mccombie_5
02-10-06, 03:48 AM
Thanks everyone!

I'll read almost anything, although I tend to go for the kind of book that MAKES you think, the kind that you cant just pootle through, I read Dan Browns book through last year, and this one I just finished drags some though out of you.

They all look good Elvis and EcSTSatic, I shall be sure to take a look at some of those!!

Dickens isnt my area, although I do enjoy some of his work, I was given a leather bound set of Dickens books, I should really find those, they are probably in the attic!

JimHare
02-10-06, 09:33 AM
Well, as long as we're discussing books here...

I've been reading since I was about four years old (growing up in a family where both parents are educators will do that to you). I have usually had a preference for non-fiction, about a 90/10 bias.

If you young whippersnappers are looking for good reading, that will improve you, as opposed to the usual "summer beach reading" fare, I have some suggestions:

1) You can't go wrong with good, well written history - knowing HOW and WHY things happened in the past helps tremendously to understand HOW and WHY things happen in the present. I didn't really get this until I was about 30 or so, so if you are going "bleeech!" right now I understand. Trust me.

2) Carl Sagan - he made science understandable. Dragons of Eden, Broca's Brain, Cosmos, Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors, The Demon-Haunted World - they are all worth the time.

3) Mark Twain - you need to be a kid to like Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn as children's books, but you need to be an adult to understand them as social commentary and the monumental works of American Literature that they are.

4) Bill Bryson's A Short History of Nearly Everything is an excellent all around book about history, science, mathematics, geography, philosophy, and politics.

5) Paul Johnson's Modern Times

6) Most bookstores still carry the companion books to James Burke's marvelous documentary series Connections, The Day the Universe Changed, and Circles. Highly Recommended, very readable.

7) Anything by Issac Asimov is highly recommended

8) For good yucks, Holidays in Hell, Parliament of Whores, Give War a Chance, Peace Kills, and All the Trouble in the World by P. J. O'Rourke will turn your thinking around, if you have not already seen the light....

9) Anything by P. G. Wodehouse, while we're on the subject of Initialized Authors. He wrote about 250 books, so I'm not gonna list 'em all. It takes a while to understand his references to Edwardian turn-of-the-20th Century-England, but once you get it, he is hilarious.

10) Richard Feynman's What do you care what other people think and Surely you're Joking, Mr. Feynman give you an insight in to physics you probably never thought you'd have, plus they are a marvelous introduction to the Nobel winning scientist who played the bongo drums, did physics work while visiting strip clubs, and uncovered the real problem that caused the space shuttle Challenger disaster.

I could go on and on, but you're probably all bored by now anyway, so I'll stop.

PS: Steer clear of almost anything recommended by Oprah Winfrey..as we've found out, her standards leave a bit to be desired.:thepan:

Elvis
02-10-06, 10:11 AM
Elvis swooped in with his magical modly goodness and saved the day by banning him. Thanks again Elvis! :D

Although I'd like to, I can't take credit. Don Salvatore swooped in with a big broom and swept the place out.

Whatshisface is now in "witness protection" with big pu$$y.

gothicaleigh
02-10-06, 10:14 AM
I'll read almost anything, although I tend to go for the kind of book that MAKES you think, the kind that you cant just pootle through, I read Dan Browns book through last year, and this one I just finished drags some though out of you.

I assume you are referring to the DaVinci Code? If you enjoyed that, you should read Angels&Demons, which is the book that the Code is the sequel to. In my opinion, it is the better read of the two and one of my all time favorites.

Another series I always recommend is the Warlord Chronicles by Bernard Cornwell (The Winter King, Enemy of God, and Excalibur). It's a retelling of the Arthurian legends that tries to stay as historically accurate of dark age britain as possible. Merlin is a druid, Arthur a warlord, Britain facing off the saxon invaders, conflicts between the native religions and early christianity, and the quest for the holy... um, cauldron (as it originally was in Welsh folklore).
All told through the eyes of an aging monk who used to be one of Arthur's warriors and close friends. Excellent and believable storytelling.

I just finished reading Jennifer Government by Max Berry. It's a light read that still manages to make you think. It's set in the near future where corporations control the world and governments compete with them for funding (for some reason, not real hard to imagine ;) ). It starts with Nike hiring someone to kill customers to build street cred for their new line of shoes and before it's over it involves everyone from Pepsi to the NRA.
At times it seems like a parody and others it comes close enough to reality that it seems like social commentary.

Among the next books I'm planning on picking up is Anne Rice's Christ the Lord (which sounds to be very interesting coming from the supposedly newly converted author who is best known for vampire novels) which is about Jesus' early years.
I'm also looking at the Saxon Stories series also by Bernard Cornwell (Last Kingdom, Pale Horseman, The Lords of the North Country). It's set 300 years after the Warlord Chronicles and is about the Vikings coming to Britain (I'm a bit obsessed with history in that part of the world at the moment for some reason).

Elvis
02-10-06, 10:20 AM
I assume you are referring to the DaVinci Code? If you enjoyed that, you should read Angels&Demons, which is the book that the Code is the sequel to. In my opinion, it is the better read of the two and one of my all time favorites.



I'm going to recommend another one along those lines.

The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco. It's about a monastery with a library containing all the secret writings from Biblical times that the Catholic Church censored. It's a murder mystery.

It makes you wonder about all the other historical texts that were lost or intentionally destroyed.

It's not a bad movie, either. Sean Connery and Christian Slater were in it.

OffThaHorseCEO
02-10-06, 10:25 AM
hey, check out wilbur smith's "the warlock" . pretty good fiction IMO

JimHare
02-10-06, 10:50 AM
Just don't forget, all, that Brown's book(s) and Name of the Rose are fictionalized novels - not denying they're readable and worth the time, just don't lose sight of the fact that they are novels, and as such, NOT to be taken as literal truth. The only reason I bring this up is because I've had several discussion with people who thought the Code was non-fiction, and were adamant about it. But both are good reads, nevertheless.

gothicaleigh
02-10-06, 11:07 AM
Just don't forget, all, that Brown's book(s) and Name of the Rose are fictionalized novels - not denying they're readable and worth the time, just don't lose sight of the fact that they are novels, and as such, NOT to be taken as literal truth. The only reason I bring this up is because I've had several discussion with people who thought the Code was non-fiction, and were adamant about it. But both are good reads, nevertheless.

True, but their fiction is based upon some very real points that have been debated for years. Just because the book is fiction doesn't mean it can't have a basis in truth. ;)

It's entertaining the stir that the upcoming movie release is causing within Opus Dei and even more so their response to what is claimed in the story. Every time one of their members tries to defend the organization, instead of outright denying the points presented, they inadvertantly reinforce them ("well, we do what the book describes but it's not as bad as it makes it out to be" kind of responses thus far). The debate surrounding the book is far more engrossing than the novel itself. :D




Another book that I liked for the same reasons was The Celestine Prophecy. It makes you think and explains a few very real truths through a fictional story.

:stirpot:

Patrick7997
02-10-06, 11:13 AM
I read like crazy... very relaxing. Allows me to think about something besides what is going on around me, which is a big plus sometimes....

Anyway, if you haven't discovered Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child, you need to. A few of their titles:

The Ice Limit - One of the best books I've read in years.
Riptide - Another outstanding book
Thunderhead - very decent.

Also, I have really enjoyed John Sanford's "Prey" Novels. Hidden Prey, Eyes of Prey, etc etc.

Lots of these may be available at half-price bookstore type places.

Check 'em out!

mccombie_5
02-10-06, 11:19 AM
Just for the record I ment books in my earlier post, not book, I've read the Da Vinci code, Angels and Demons, Deception Point and Digital Fortress, from about half way through last year, among other books.

This is turning into a great thread, I'm getting some fantastic suggestions!!

My card is going to be taking a hammering methinks, now, do I buy books or a giant teddy bear in light of Valentines Day :rolleyes: :shhh:

nickc50310
02-10-06, 11:19 AM
Im not a huge fan of reading but I do it occasionally. My favorite book ever is the autobiography of DMX- a great book even if youre not into the whole rap scene. Tom Clancy also writes some damn fine books. "A child called it" is a great book also.

Patrick7997
02-10-06, 11:20 AM
Forgot to mention, I just read a FANTASTIC non-fiction book called "Into Thin Air" by John Krakauer, I believe. True story of trying to climb Mount Everest... incredible book. This guy is real lucky to be alive.... There's some later re-editions of this book that have a lot of additional "post disaster" commentary by a lot of the people involved.... definitely worthwhile. Try to find a later edition.

Also, if you like non-fiction, "Shadow Divers" by Robert Kurson is really good. If you've ever seen "Deep Sea Detectives", on Discovery, those guys are the guys in this book. Really good book.

Check 'em out!

Kev
02-10-06, 11:44 AM
If you like non-fiction and horses you might want to red this one;

The Man Who Listens to Horses, by Monty Roberts

Monty if a local rancher here, has a beautiful ranch between Buellton and Solvang, CA, not far from where I live. He grew up in Salinas, CA, has a very tough and interesting life. He may be the guy that the movie "Horse Whisperer" was based on, I'm not sure. I read the book over 5 years ago, I thought it was well written and kept my attention very nicely.

JimHare
02-10-06, 12:04 PM
Forgot to mention, I just read a FANTASTIC non-fiction book called "Into Thin Air" by John Krakauer, I believe. True story of trying to climb Mount Everest... incredible book. This guy is real lucky to be alive.... There's some later re-editions of this book that have a lot of additional "post disaster" commentary by a lot of the people involved.... definitely worthwhile. Try to find a later edition.


Ahhhh, yes, now you're getting into another of my hobbies - mountaineering.

Krakour's book has taken some (fairly, undeserved) drubbing but most professionals agree it's pretty much on the mark. For those unaware, it's the story of a deadly disaster on Everest that was due in no small part to the foolish attempts by novices to climb, and the equally foolish attempts by professional climbers to guide them to the top. Two world class climbers died of exposure, several amateurs perished, and one Russian climber (the late Anatoli Boukreev) saved at least three people from certain death.

For about $65,000, anyone who has the money can hire someone else to 'guide' them to the top of Everest. Many times this amounts to not much more than dragging the client to the top on a rope, and then dragging them back down again. While the physical demands of climbing Everest are not that great anymore, the everpresent danger of bad weather makes the trip risky should it strike - and when the lure of publicity, money, and fame add in to the mix, it's a recipe for disaster.

Good book. Good lessons. Not everyone learned them.

JimHare
02-10-06, 12:30 PM
True, but their fiction is based upon some very real points that have been debated for years. Just because the book is fiction doesn't mean it can't have a basis in truth. ;)
[ snip ]
Another book that I liked for the same reasons was The Celestine Prophecy. It makes you think and explains a few very real truths through a fictional story.

:stirpot:

Agreed. However, one must remember that the actual number of "very real truths" in these stories is much smaller than what is generally perceived. I'm still not sure how an ancient Mayan manuscript turned up in Peru, written in Aramaic... :confused:

There is, unfortunately, a very common misconception among many people as to what truth really is. Just ask James Frey...

I~LUV~Caddys8792
06-27-06, 05:54 PM
Lately, I've been on a Steven King addiction. First, I read Christine, that was a great book. Then two weeks ago, I saw Stanley Kubrick's "The Shining" on TV, and I was really impressed with it, so I went out and bought Steven King's book and I read it in like 8 days...it's ~650 pages. So now I'm gonna go out and get "The Stand" tonight. It sounds like it's a great book.

I was debating whether or not to buy another Clancy novel, but I can't get past chapter 7 in "Rainbow Six"...that book is too complicated and too detailed. And I hate how it jumps from topic to topic.

Anyone King fans here?

gary88
06-27-06, 06:06 PM
I've always been a fan of autobiographies. The last one I read was Dale Earnhardt Jr's. Really good book.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
06-27-06, 06:19 PM
I really like the rock and roll biographys. Mostly the ones written by Steven Davis. "Old Gods Almost Dead" is his Rolling Stones Biography, and "Hammer Of The Gods" is his Led Zeppelin biography.

Elvis
06-28-06, 07:14 AM
Don't waste your time on Deception Point by Dan Brown. I'm beginning to think that all these anti-daVinci Code fanatics are right about him.

Maybe he's not a very good writer, and maybe he just latched onto a hot idea that's been around for over 1000 years and exploited it.

I don't object to the daVinci Code at all, but I do object to my time and money being wasted.

I'm working through the new Roberto Clemente book now. I'll let you know how it comes out.

Boombotz
06-28-06, 08:28 AM
One of my favorite books is Intensity by Dean Koontz. It is pretty old and you may have read it already, but if you haven't it is a great read! I read that book in 2 days could not put it down.

Elvis
06-28-06, 09:09 AM
Koontz is good, and so is James Patterson.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
06-28-06, 09:44 AM
I was thinking about buying "Davinci Code", but my parents would have a shitfit if they knew I was reading a book that questioned the bible.

OffThaHorseCEO
06-28-06, 10:09 AM
wheres craig lately?

anyone ever read warlock by wilbur smith? i think i mentioned it in this thread already a while back

EcSTSatic
06-28-06, 10:50 AM
I was thinking about buying "Davinci Code", but my parents would have a shitfit if they knew I was reading a book that questioned the bible.

There's nothing sinful in reading it. I have friends who are Catholic priests that read it and watched the movie. To them it's about being informed.

I won't do either for two reasons;

I don't want Brown to make money off me
I have better things to do with my time.If you want to read an excellent historical novel instead of a fantasy claiming to be historical, read "Gates of Fire (http://www.stevenpressfield.com/books/gates_fire.asp)" by Steven Pressfield about the Spartans at Thermopylae.

gary88
06-28-06, 11:10 AM
I really like the rock and roll biographys. Mostly the ones written by Steven Davis. "Old Gods Almost Dead" is his Rolling Stones Biography, and "Hammer Of The Gods" is his Led Zeppelin biography.


You should read "Stairway to Heaven" by Richard Cole. He was the tour manager for Led Zeppelin, a really great read. I finished it in 2 days.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
06-28-06, 11:16 AM
You should read "Stairway to Heaven" by Richard Cole. He was the tour manager for Led Zeppelin, a really great read. I finished it in 2 days.


I was gonna buy that one, but Hammer of the Gods was like $7 cheaper :D

Elvis
06-28-06, 12:48 PM
I was thinking about buying "Davinci Code", but my parents would have a shitfit if they knew I was reading a book that questioned the bible.

It explores an interesting theory, but offers no proof. It's a work of fiction and a lot of people are making a HUGE deal out of it for the reason you mentioned.

It wasn't a GREAT book, but it wasn't bad either. Entertainment that killed a few evenings for me. I don't think I'll go to hell for it.

You really haven't missed anything by not reading it.

DBA-One
06-28-06, 06:04 PM
I've been trying to read The Catcher In The Rye for years now. I just can't stand the way that book is written. It's like listening to a dumb kid. Any one else like Frederick Forsythe?

LittleB
06-28-06, 06:08 PM
I was thinking about buying "Davinci Code", but my parents would have a shitfit if they knew I was reading a book that questioned the bible.

They would get upset if you read a FICTION book about other theories?

I really don't understand why everyone has made such a big deal about it. I thought it was a really great book, loved it.



I've been trying to read The Catcher In The Rye for years now. I just can't stand the way that book is written. It's like listening to a dumb kid. Any one else like Frederick Forsythe?

I had to read that in school..I don't really even remember much about it...what's it about again?

DBA-One
06-28-06, 06:11 PM
This kid who keeps getting kicked out of provate schools and has some wild adventure in NYC in the 50's. I never get more than a 1/3 through before I just get tired of the way it is written.

LittleB
06-28-06, 06:20 PM
Ohhhhhhhhhhh now I remember!!! Yeah I remember HATING the book in the beginning, but by the end I liked it.

DBA-One
06-28-06, 06:23 PM
If I could ever get past the first few chapters. I've read Digital Fortress, DaVinci, Angels and Demons, all Dan Brown books. I read Digital in 4 days, DaVinci in a week but the last one took me two weeks. His books are starting to be all the same. He is a great writer but sometimes he goes a bit too far with the details.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
06-28-06, 06:33 PM
This kid who keeps getting kicked out of provate schools and has some wild adventure in NYC in the 50's. I never get more than a 1/3 through before I just get tired of the way it is written.

Oh that book bored the shit out of me. It was a mandatory read my senior year.

Florian
06-28-06, 10:56 PM
Hey, don't forget the classics! Have you read any Dickens? Some of his writing is a bit stuffy but I've always enjoyed Oliver Twist.

Read Dickens? Ive given some....some Hot Dickens Cider, that is!


Waiting to use that line forever!


F

gary88
06-29-06, 12:27 AM
Am I the only one who kinda liked Catcher in the Rye?? It was the only book I actually read for school last year, I thought it was interesting. We had to read the Great Gatsby, but that bored the hell out of me so I used sparknotes for everything. Then we watched the movie in class, which was a nice 80 minute nap :)

Elvis
06-29-06, 06:48 AM
Gatsby should probably be removed from the required reading list now. I just don't think it's relevant anymore.

Same for Catcher in the Rye. I had to read both and I don't see the point. High school kids today have seen so much more and experienced so much more, they need to be reading something more substantive.

Harry Potter is deeper than most of the stuff they made me read.

Boombotz
06-29-06, 07:40 AM
I was thinking about buying "Davinci Code", but my parents would have a shitfit if they knew I was reading a book that questioned the bible.

I just started reading it. My mom bought it for me like a year ago and I am just now getting to it. I have not seen the movie, and wont until I finish with the book.

Boombotz
06-29-06, 07:46 AM
Ken Follett-Pillars of the Earth was another fantastic read. This book was recommended to me very highly. It was completely different from what I was used to reading. I enjoyed it thoroughly and would recommend anyone to read it.

DBA-One
06-29-06, 08:39 AM
I just started reading it. My mom bought it for me like a year ago and I am just now getting to it. I have not seen the movie, and wont until I finish with the book.

Wanna know what happens at the end?

Boombotz
06-29-06, 09:02 AM
Wanna know what happens at the end?

NO:thepan: !!!!!!!!!!

OffThaHorseCEO
06-29-06, 09:08 AM
so, wheres craig, did i miss something?

AirJigga25
06-29-06, 02:50 PM
mccombie = lying ass liar

I~LUV~Caddys8792
06-29-06, 06:26 PM
Um yeah that was like 6 months ago, and it seems that everyone else on here has gotten over it and move on to accept him for who he is, myself included. So what's your deal?

Elvis
06-30-06, 08:46 AM
Um yeah that was like 6 months ago, and it seems that everyone else on here has gotten over it and move on to accept him for who he is, myself included. So what's your deal?

Don't bother asking. He does a fly-by every three days, makes one negative comment and leaves. Check his history.