: where are the plugs on my 03 dhs northstar engine?



gutierrezcaddy
02-04-06, 03:15 AM
THIS IS MY FIRST CADDY, I OWN A 2003 DHS I WANT TO CHANGE THE PLUGS BUT I DONT EVEN KNOW WHERE TO START:confused: I DONT EVEN SEE ANY WIRES, I KNOW THERE ARE MANY GUYS HERE WHO KNOE THEIR STUFF HERE SO IF YOU CAN HELP ID APPRECIATE IT!:thumbsup:

Ranger
02-04-06, 11:36 AM
There are no wires. I think it was in 2000 they went to COP (Coil ON Plug) ignition. If you look at the cam cover you will see a module in it. I am not sure of the proper name for it, coil pack, coil module ICM. At any rate, it contains the coils and the plugs are under it. Why are you changing plugs on an '03? Have you got that many miles on it? Shouldn't need to do it til at least 100K.

gutierrezcaddy
02-04-06, 04:43 PM
no actually its got just about 30,000 but its my habit to change my cars plugs every 30,000, thanks will look under the hood and see what i've got.

Ranger
02-04-06, 06:16 PM
At 30K you are wasting money and good plugs. That is old school thinking. That is why the Northstar plugs are double platinum tipped, for longevity. I would not even think about changing them til 75K and then it would only be a thought unless I had a problem. Many people here have gone well over 100K.

STS 310
02-04-06, 09:53 PM
I definately agree with Ranger, dont waste your money.

chevelle
02-05-06, 12:19 AM
no actually its got just about 30,000 but its my habit to change my cars plugs every 30,000, thanks will look under the hood and see what i've got.


You'll do more harm than good changing the plugs. Leave them alone for at least 100K. Likely they well never need replacing, actually.

If you absolutely MUST change them make sure and use the correct OEM dual platinum plug. Other plugs will not work as well as the OEM plug (they are cheaper for a reason) and you will not be happy with them.

Really....leave them alone. There is absolutely no reason to touch them. If the engine should start to misfire for some reason the onboard diagnostics will set a "mis-fire" code and alert you to the problem. If you aren't setting any codes then the plugs are fine.

mcowden
02-06-06, 01:21 PM
I'll chime in and agree with everyone else: Don't touch the plugs until they're due, which is probably 100k-110k miles. You're just asking for trouble by changing them 70k miles before they're due, not to mention wasting time and money. The plugs are platinum-tipped on both sides, not just on one side, and they hold up very well for a very long time. 30k plug changes is old school thinking. Plugs are much better these days, and engines don't eat them up the way they used to. There is just no need to keep such short-interval maintenance practices any longer.

Rob Benham
02-07-06, 05:31 PM
Just a quick question. Is there any fear that leaving the plugs in for 100k will affect the threads?

In the bad old days, I used to pull the plugs and lube the threads with copper and then replace the originals. Is this now not at all necessary?

Ranger
02-11-06, 09:23 AM
I pulled the plugs on my '97 at about 90k and had no problems. Lubing the threads is not recommended.

El Dobro
02-11-06, 10:46 AM
I wouldn't change the plugs, but it wouldn't hurt to look at them to see if the ground electrode is still there after 30,000. I've seen many instances where they fell off.