: Attn: 2001 Catera Owners



guardian
02-02-06, 12:52 PM
Does anyone out there own a 2001 Catera that was actually _BUILT_ in 2001?

(the build date of your car is on a data plate attached to the rear edge of the driver's door)

The youngest Catera I have been able to identify so far was built in November of 2000.

I'm beginning to wonder if the Catera was ever actually manufactured in this century!

Chaztera
02-02-06, 06:47 PM
Guardian,

I own a 2001 Catera & it was built in Germany .

Date of Mfg. on the plate is : 06 - 00

Most of the cars were built before september 00 ( that's when they
start selling next years models, ie a 2002 would be built before 2001).

Good luck in your search...:thumbsup:

MyOpel
02-04-06, 04:47 PM
mine is also an 06-00
2000 is part of this century
The Opel Omega B continued production until 2002 (The Carera is an Omega)

guardian
02-04-06, 05:57 PM
2000 is not part of this century; never was, never will be. It takes 100 full years to complete a century; and there was never a "year zero". This is intuitively obvious, even to a casual observer, but disregards Julian, Gregorian, and all that calendar legerdemain and rejiggering razz-ma-tazz they did back in the Middle Ages.

So still trying to learn if there are any Cateras with a build date ending in "01". So far, I am unaware of any Cateras built in the twenty-first century, which commenced 01/01/2001 (just as the first century commenced 01/01/0001, two thousand years earlier).

Still hoping there might be someone out there who actually OWNS a 2001 Catera built in 2001. Even a build date of 01/01 would work, but it is a REALLY tough find.

Candidly, I think maybe they stopped building Cateras in 2000.

MyOpel
02-05-06, 09:36 PM
I guess you're one of the guys that thought the Y2K bug was going to get you in 2001.
With all the inaccuracies of the calendars prior to the one we currently use we're probably off by a year. Even our current calendar is off by just over 20 sec/year.
Anyways what does it matter if there weren't any Cateras built in 2001? It is intuitively obvious, even to a casual observer that production of the next model year begins well before the year commences.
Hell in the next month we're going to perform line trials on the 2007 model (yes they will be sold as 2007 cars).
If you are still desperate to determine if any were produced in 2001 pick up your telephone and call GM. They have a great service that provided me with the exact build date of my 75 Vette along with a variety of other general and vehicle specific information.

guardian
02-06-06, 12:42 AM
Chaztera and MyOpel, thanks and much appreciated. Here is an update, what I have been able to discover so far:

Apparently at the time of Catera manufacture the Ruesselsheim factory was old . . very old. Toward the end of 2000, or before, GM had arrived at a decision point:

Either they had to close Ruesselsheim or, in essence, rebuild it from scratch to modern standards. It was hopelessly antiquated at the end of 2000, unable to support modern automobile manufacturing approaches.

Nobody has reported owning a 2001 Catera actually built in 2001. My best guesstimate is none exists. It appears they finished up building Cateras toward the end of 2000. Then they rebuilt the whole damn factory!

From what I've been able to learn, at the end of 2000 the state of the Ruesselsheim facility no longer supported auto assembly to modern standards. Apparently even in the several years prior it was no ball of fire either. The factory WAS rebuilt in 2001 to modern standards, but by then German Catera production had ceased. Most of you already know the newer Cadillac CTS (Catera Touring Sedan) is Made in the USA.

11/00 continues to be the most recent Catera automobile build date I can confirm. If anyone out there has a younger Cat, please let us know.

Thanks!

Oh, as for observations:

Most would agree the German Cateras, all of them, have had more than their fair share of problems. It is JMHO, but the antiquated state of the Ruesselsheim factory at the end could, I think, have been a contributing factor. It was not an ideal or modern manufacturing setting.

MyOpel
02-06-06, 02:31 AM
Most would agree the German Cateras, all of them, have had more than their fair share of problems. It is JMHO, but the antiquated state of the Ruesselsheim factory at the end could, I think, have been a contributing factor. It was not an ideal or modern manufacturing setting.
I would have to disagree
99-01 Cateras seem to be more reliable then pre 99 with 01 being the most reliable. The issues with Cateras seem to be mostly design flaws and not assembly flaws.
Manufactures no longer build cars they assemble them. Generally the manufactures will stamp the sheet metal weld the body and paint, everything else comes from various suppliers and is bolted to the body.
Just a few examples on the Catera: Gauge cluster = VDO, Radio = Bose, Electrical = Bosh...

Warez
02-06-06, 03:51 AM
2000 is not part of this century; never was, never will be. It takes 100 full years to complete a century; and there was never a "year zero". This is intuitively obvious, even to a casual observer, but disregards Julian, Gregorian, and all that calendar legerdemain and rejiggering razz-ma-tazz they did back in the Middle Ages.

2000 was indeed the start of the 21st century.

Don't tell me you thought the turn of the century was 2001:cookoo:

Warez
02-06-06, 04:37 AM
Either they had to close Ruesselsheim or, in essence, rebuild it from scratch to modern standards. It was hopelessly antiquated at the end of 2000, unable to support modern automobile manufacturing approaches.

Which manufacturing technologies are you specifically referring to?



Most would agree the German Cateras, all of them, have had more than their fair share of problems. It is JMHO, but the antiquated state of the Ruesselsheim factory at the end could, I think, have been a contributing factor. It was not an ideal or modern manufacturing setting.

On what do you base these sweeping conclusions? This is all simply your speculation with really no factual basis at all, are you a manufacturing engineer?

Regardless, our cars were simply assembled there, and as far as I know they do not have any problems indicative of a poor assembly line. On the other hand I was very impressed by the structural tolerance that these cars were manufactured to. For example: notice that the door hinges are welded to the body rather than bolted, yet the gaps are perfectly symmetrical all around. Bolting allows for greater adjustment on the line, the dimensional analysis on our cars was high enough to make this redundant. These cars did not use any shimming anywhere either. Most people will never notice these minute details yet it is very impressive for a car that entered production in 1993 at that price level. Even other models that entered production very recently are not built to this spec.

You also will find that 90% of the problems that plague Catera's are electrical and they stem from the sub-standard Bosch electronics (most of the Cateraís electronics are Bosch) and various components from GM suppliers. None of the pervasive problems are assembly line related but rather supply chain.

And personally I have yet to have a problem with my Catera other than the shit Bosch MAF.

Ever wonder why late model BMW's and Mercedes also have so many electrical problems? Bosch is their supplier.

guardian
02-06-06, 09:55 AM
Thanks for the responses! It is great to hear even from the math challenged!

But on the more important matter of the Catera:

I agree there were PLENTY of design problems. But I continue to believe the old factory could have been, as I wrote earlier, a CONTRIBUTING factor to Catera troubles.

I want to amend slightly what I wrote earlier:

Apparently the old Ruesselsheim factory was not torn down, at least not straightaway. The new facility was constructed circa 2001 ALONGSIDE the old post-war facility. No Cateras were manufactured in the new, modern facility. However, I cannot pin down yet how long Catera assembly might have continued within the old building, just prior to its being closed and shuttered.

Also these personal observations:

As a lifelong fan of the MG automobile, my interest in the Catera has developed only recently. I confess to being accustomed to the situation with MG, where many books have been written about the history of the marque, the details of production, the people involved, etc., etc..

This kind of "backgrounder" data is somewhat more difficult to discover for Catera, though perhaps additional details will come to light in the fullness of time. Knowing more about circumstances surrounding a car's manufacture is interesting.

As for folks out there secure in the belief a century can comprise fewer than 100 years: thanks so much! You are a wonderful and delightful source of amusement!

Warez
02-06-06, 12:23 PM
Thanks for the responses! It is great to hear even from the math challenged!

As for folks out there secure in the belief a century can comprise fewer than 100 years: thanks so much! You are a wonderful and delightful source of amusement!


Donít act like a pompous fool, youíre just making an ass of yourself. We are all well aware of the mathematical reasoning and while even ISO does include the year zero, and considers the 21st century to begin on Jan 1st 2001; most contemporary historians consider it to actually begin at the start of the year 2000.

:helpless:



I agree there were PLENTY of design problems. But I continue to believe the old factory could have been, as I wrote earlier, a CONTRIBUTING factor to Catera troubles.

Your conclusion is simply absurd and devoid of all logic.

Explain how any of the electrical problems could have ever been resultant of the assembly line if those problem components were never even manufactured there ie. various Bosch sensors, EBTC module, leveling pump etc.



Apparently the old Ruesselsheim factory was not torn down, at least not straightaway. The new facility was constructed circa 2001 ALONGSIDE the old post-war facility. No Cateras were manufactured in the new, modern facility. However, I cannot pin down yet how long Catera assembly might have continued within the old building, just prior to its being closed and shuttered.

Have you ever been in an assembly line? Obviously not; an assembly line is just a large open building with tooling sitting along a conveyor. You may have an old dilapidated building while still utilizing modern tooling. Keep in mind that an entirely new car replaced the omega which utilized a different assembly line likely requiring a different layout which might not have been suited to the layout of the old structure.