: Go easy on the polishing compound, okay?



Jesda
01-29-06, 08:03 PM
I hand washed the Bimmer this afternoon. I was quite proud of it as it shined in the sunlight. Afterwards, I used Turtle Wax polishing compound on the entire body and went a little overboard. It was on so thick I couldnt wipe it off with a towel. The car was completely CAKED in white stuff. This was a job for an automated car wash.

I drove to a Shell station and filled up with $20 of 87. As I was finishing up, a guy filling up next to me said "Wow, went a little overboard there?"

I plainly replied, 'I dont know what you mean.' He stared at me blankly saying nothing while I finished up and went in to pay and get my car wash ticket.

Lesson learned. Car looks great, though! :biggrin:

Night Wolf
01-29-06, 08:12 PM
Yup, SAME product my friend did that with his Jetta... he put it on witha buffer and tried to take it off with a buffer, then with the auto car wash... it was still stuck on :)

Tell ya what... Turtle Wax rubbing compond is some good stuff! really cleans up old nasty paint well.

Katshot
01-29-06, 08:20 PM
Rubbing compound and polishing compound are two different things (rubbing compound is much more abrasive). You CAN apply them both with a buffer but you don't work them like waxes and polishes. You don't apply them, let them dry and then buff off. They are meant to be applied and worked until you have the desired surface and then removed. Doing a small area at a time is the best way to go. Just be careful, they are very abrasive and can remove a good deal of material quickly, especially if you use a buffer.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
01-29-06, 08:24 PM
I know if you rub it too hard or too much, it'll chafe and burn......


HAHAHAHAHA!!!! :histeric:

Seriously though, I havent waxed my deville yet, but I did wax the Roadmaster. It took FOREVER to do that car!

CMC
01-29-06, 08:31 PM
Haha!

Wasn't that smart Jesda :rolleyes:

Night Wolf
01-29-06, 10:16 PM
Rubbing compound and polishing compound are two different things (rubbing compound is much more abrasive). You CAN apply them both with a buffer but you don't work them like waxes and polishes. You don't apply them, let them dry and then buff off. They are meant to be applied and worked until you have the desired surface and then removed. Doing a small area at a time is the best way to go. Just be careful, they are very abrasive and can remove a good deal of material quickly, especially if you use a buffer.

I know :) I have both, I was simply saying, that Turtle Wax rubbing compound does wonders :)

slk230mb
01-29-06, 10:29 PM
Any new pics Jesda?

caddeville
01-29-06, 10:49 PM
How come u guys go for turtle wax? Its impossible to get off either way!! Try AutoGlym or Carbrite. They make one of the best polishes/abrasives. I use thier products all the time, my dads factory paintjob on his caddy looks like new after their polishes.

As for professional rubbing compounds, there is usually extra abrasive, fine abrasive, ultra-fine abrasive. Then finishing polish. Then wax. (just saying)

How the gas milage on the bimmer?

Jesda
01-29-06, 11:17 PM
Im doing 22 highway and 18.5 city. Not good considering its a 2.5L I6, but well within factory claims, so its in good tune. :) Runs on regular though!

Night Wolf
01-29-06, 11:33 PM
I only use Turtle Wax rubbing compound... highly abrasive and it took all the oxidation and fading out of the paint on the '79... actually started rubbinbg thin in a few places....

for regular wax, I tried all the magical expensive stuff at shows... and I still go back to Meguires... I used to use Gold Glass... now they have the NXT Generation... I love the stuff and thats what I use now.

Anyway, here are some pictures of the Turtle Wax rubbing compound. On both the Caddy and the Jetta it was only 1 application... the results were amazing! You can easily tell which side is old and which side is compounded... in the case of the Jetta... compare the sail panel to the door... it all looked like that door!...

Once you use the rubbing compound, just keep it waxed... paint it like new! So many old cars with hazy paint can be restored like this... not all of them but most... and you do gotta be careful since you are basically taking a layer of clear coat/paint off.

Night Wolf
01-29-06, 11:36 PM
Im doing 22 highway and 18.5 city. Not good considering its a 2.5L I6, but well within factory claims, so its in good tune. :) Runs on regular though!

geezeee... for a 2.5L and a manual you'd think it would be getting better then that...

my '89 Oldsmobile 3800 got 22mpg town and 32mpg highway.... driving with a heavy foot... automatic. 18gal. tank I often got over 400miles/tank driving to work and back.... all on regular gas :)....I think I even beat a couple of them BMW's too.... :)

JC316
01-30-06, 12:19 AM
I had to compound my ENTIRE car the other day due to some serious overspray from the clear coat my dad put on the top. I used some 3m High grade buffing compound, it did wonders. My car looks GREAT now and I got a lesson in buffing 101. I tried one door by hand and said "Screw this".

I~LUV~Caddys8792
01-30-06, 04:42 PM
Haha!

Wasn't that smart Jesda :rolleyes:

We're you talking about my witty comment? ;)

Jesda
01-30-06, 10:02 PM
Any new pics Jesda?

Soon as I get it looking right. I need to start from scratch with a clay bar.