: Modern Muscle Cars, will they become collectible?



SpeedyArizona
01-23-06, 12:09 AM
Ok, we all know about the recent craze of fuel-thirsty, powerful muscle cars, so I pose this question to all of you. Will the MODERN one's ever become sought-after in 35-40 years? Think about it, muscle cars were plentiful back in their day (some sold nearly 100,000 vehicles in THAT particular year), will the modern versions ever become an item of desire for today's youth that can't afford them in high school?

Here's a short run-down on the modern muscle car list:

2007 Shelby GT500 (beautful, the Shelby name always means big-bucks)
2005-? Ford Mustang GT (the first)
2009 Dodge Challenger R/T (stunning, I give them a 95% chance of making it)
2004-? Pontiac GTO (ugly as sin, but only my opinion)
2009 Chevy Camaro SS (possibly)
2006 Dodge Charger R/T (nice as a family car, but not true to its' roots)

terrible one
01-23-06, 12:33 AM
I've wondered this many times. However, I've mostly dwelled upon the fact that all these "modern" muscle cars are either continuations or "bring-backs" of an original line. Therefore, I really have no clue. I'll vote yes anyways, because back then a lot of these high dollar cars were really nothing special. Some were, yes, but some were just normal base model cars. Makes you think.

COBlackZ06
01-23-06, 01:28 AM
What's the line from "Raiders of the Lost Ark"?

"You see this pocket watch, Indiana? Purchased from a street vendor for a few dollars. But, bury it in the sand for a thousand years, and it will be priceless."

Everything of value will appreciate eventually. (Emphasis on eventually.) If these muscle cars are designed well, and have a popular appeal now, 25 years from now, a well maintained example of them will likely be worth quite a bit. Advance that 10 years further, and you'll be seeing them auctioned for outrageous amounts on Barret Jackson.

So I'd say yes to the poll question- given enough time.

Randy_W
01-23-06, 08:31 AM
Ok, we all know about the recent craze of fuel-thirsty, powerful muscle cars, so I pose this question to all of you. Will the MODERN one's ever become sought-after in 35-40 years? Think about it, muscle cars were plentiful back in their day (some sold nearly 100,000 vehicles in THAT particular year), will the modern versions ever become an item of desire for today's youth that can't afford them in high school?

Here's a short run-down on the modern muscle car list:

2007 Shelby GT500 (beautful, the Shelby name always means big-bucks)
2005-? Ford Mustang GT (the first)
2009 Dodge Challenger R/T (stunning, I give them a 95% chance of making it)
2004-? Pontiac GTO (ugly as sin, but only my opinion)
2009 Chevy Camaro SS (possibly)
2006 Dodge Charger R/T (nice as a family car, but not true to its' roots)

You understand that the Challenger is no more a certainty to be built than the Camaro? If it is, as I've said before and nobody listens, if you read the article attached to the Challenger pics, if they build it, it will be a re-skinned 300, not the concept you see there. The whole chassis has been shortened, narrowed and the overhangs lengthened and the body built from carbon fiber to make the concept look like the original. Chrysler says "IF" they build it, it will be more like a 2 dr Charger, no Manual Transmission and will weigh more like 4300 lbs than the already porky 4100 lbs the concept weighs.

Katshot
01-23-06, 09:22 AM
Whether the Challenger is ever built, or how it eventually turns out has nothing to do with the question here.
Bottom line, as was already said, "eventually" most things will be worth money and have some sort of collectibility. Obviously, some things (like some cars) will attain this status faster than others and to varying degrees but I think it's safe to say that these modern muscle cars will be worth money someday. There ARE a few things working against them that the previous 60's and early 70's muscle cars didn't.
1. Those older cars weren't built as well as today's cars and therefore fewer of them have managed to survive over the years. the more rare the car, the faster it appreciates.
2. The older cars were far cheaper cars than most of today's "modern muscle cars" so it was easier for them to actually appreciate. Today's cars must not only weather some serious DE-preciation first but then contend with already high prices before actually being able to appreciate in any way.
3. The earlier muscle cars have the now deep-pocketed "baby-boomers" to keep their values up. 20+ years from now, who's going to be looking back on these cars favorably? Most of them are kids now that are into all these Import cars, NOT Domestic muscle cars.

SpeedyArizona
01-23-06, 09:44 AM
I see your point, Katshot. Most of the cars back then were cheap, and I forgot that most of the people who bought muscle cars, worked 'em like a dog.

Most of them are kids now that are into all these Import cars, NOT Domestic muscle cars.

Damn kids ::mad2: !

70eldo
01-23-06, 11:32 AM
Are you planning a future investment? :D

Randy_W
01-23-06, 11:52 AM
Whether the Challenger is ever built, or how it eventually turns out has nothing to do with the question here.


I answered yes to the poll, I was refering to his description of the Challenger as "stunning", and it is, I'm just saying that since the production car, if it happens, won't look like that, it might affect it's collectablity, just as changes in the Camaro before production, if it happens, may affect it.

To address the rest of what you said, I agree. I've said for years, when this generation of baby boomers is gone, nobody is going to love the '60's cars like we did. Values will drop on many models and only the cream of the crop will have any attention. That's how it was 40 years ago, a hand full of older cars had significance but there were'nt shows by the dozen every Saturday from April to October like there are now, when we're gone, most of the interest in these cars will be as well.

davc
01-23-06, 12:41 PM
for the most part , i would vote 'no' ... i think today's car being mass produced won't become as collectable .... there won't be models that are " 1 of only 6-20 " that were made .....

maybe real 'special' very limited runs .... but you'll pay a lot extra for them up front .... and i don't know if overpaying now would pay off in 20-30 years .. ??!!??

and you have to find the right market and the right buyer .... but it is more fun than watching your money slowly (very) grow in the bank ..

EcSTSatic
01-23-06, 02:16 PM
IMO, I think what will kill the collectability of new cars is lack of parts! There's too dang much stuff on cars today - none of which is supported much past the expected lifespan. I don't see Year One ever supporting the electronics it will take to keep these cars running 40 years from now!
That's why the old cars are still around. Repros can be made!

I dumped my '88 Ford Thunderbird TurboCoupe for that very reason. My model was only made for two years; "$1000 for a master cylinder?". "What d'ya mean they don't make the electronic struts anymore?"

Kev
01-23-06, 04:03 PM
I voted yes because I believe that what makes a car a collectible is not necessarily how well it was made, how much it has depreciated and then appreciated but rather, how much it is desired. Of course, the car in question must survive the years!

Ask yourselves this, who are buying the collectibles today? Granted, some are buying them for the investment, some for the status but, are not many of those buying them for nostalgia's sake? In 30 years it is conceivable that someone who had or wanted todays Shelby GT500 (or enter your favorite car here) would like to have one again.

As far as replacement parts are concerned, some will make due, some will become innovative and if the car has enough popularity, someone will come up with replacement alternatives. I understand the value and desirability of matching numbers in a collectible but also see the market for the compromise of after market replacements and kits.

Not everyone who collects does so for the value of the item, many do it just because they want it.

SpeedyArizona
01-23-06, 05:47 PM
As the old saying goes, "A car is only as valuable as what someone is willing to pay for it". I think that goes for anything in life. If people 30 years from now are willing to shell out big-bucks for a 2007 Shelby GT500, for example, then those cars will be appreciate in value.

In 30+ years when the baby-boomers get up in their 80's, will the value of muscle cars fall? I personally don't think it will, but I could easily be wrong. When I'm 55 (God willing), I might be going to Barrett Jackson and seeing 2006 Mustangs, 2009 Challengers (hopefully) etc etc go for unreasonably high prices. (I would go crazy if I had to pay $400,000 for a 2009 Challenger SRT-8!)