: What are my options?



Aurora By Olds
12-20-03, 12:19 PM
I've decided to time-sert my 4.0 block due to the fact that I cannot find a decent 4.6.
I've got the Vin9 cams in it and its all ready to go together, except for one thing.

19 of the bolt holes serted perfectly, however, I hit a really hard spot in the casting of the block on the last hole. By the time I got it drilled out, it there was enough tolerance in it that the tap just barely cut threads in the wall of the hole.

Here is what I have decided so far:

Go to a BIG-Sert, which is out of the question, cause I could probably find another block for the extra $350 that it would cost for the kit.

Find a Helicoil that may be just a tad bigger and use that tap and insert instead on that one hole.

Weld the hole solid with aluminum and start over.

Try my local machiene shop for ideas (the one that told me to pick the aluminum shavings up with a magnet when I was done....)

Other than that, I am out of ideas. Most of the ideas ive come up with sound rather risky, but I guess i have no choice right now.
If any of you have any opinions on my ideas other ideas, or anything else I could do please feel free.

jonrodman
12-22-03, 01:03 AM
I liked your original idea of the 4.6 "9" in the Aurora.

I took a chance recently and purchased a 100,000 mile used transmission from car-parts.com for cheap and it works perfectly. That is a good source for parts. The salvage yard shipped the trans right to the shop. They did not request a core charge. It came with a 90 day warranty.

There are cheap engines listed there also. You could probably get an inexpensive used 4.6L engine with a warranty delivered right to your door.

Aurora By Olds
12-22-03, 09:40 AM
Unfortunately, I couldn't readily find a good used 4.6 vin 9 (although an entire drivetrain went on Ebay for $700 a week before I needed it...story of my life).
I need the car done soon, so I decided to fix the 4.0 block.
I have too much $$ into it now to scrap it, so I will just try to insert it with JB Weld.
It supposedly has a working temp of 600+ degrees and a tinsle strength of close to 4000 psi, so that, combined with the threads that are there, and the thread insert of my bad hole, I should be ok. Hopefully.

I do have vin 9 cams in my 4.0 heads right now, and eventually I will be getting true dual exhaust, chip, Throttle Body, and combined with my cone I have now, Im hoping for around 320 - 325hp out of my 4.0, which is not too bad of an estimate, I think.

So I guess we'll see how it goes.

Allante North *
12-22-03, 04:11 PM
Keep us posted on the progress. I am currious as to how the JB weld will work. I sure hope it does. I'm keeping my fingers and toe's crossed for you.

zonie77
12-22-03, 11:15 PM
My initial thought was to suggest the JB weld but wasn't sure about it. I would consider doing it if it was my block.
The only other idea I came up with was to see if there was any chance of welding the hole. I don't know if anyone would have a technique for welding that deep in the hole without closing the top of it.
have you checked with any welding shops?

ljklaiber
12-23-03, 07:02 AM
My initial thought was to suggest the JB weld but wasn't sure about it. I would consider doing it if it was my block.
The only other idea I came up with was to see if there was any chance of welding the hole. I don't know if anyone would have a technique for welding that deep in the hole without closing the top of it.
have you checked with any welding shops?


Because welding distorts the block in the local area, it wold need to be true decked on a surface mill. You may be able to fine a hi grade stud with a slightly larger base, tapered to the size of the original bolt. then you retapp and use red locktight . Studs work great on alloy engine blocks. Check ARP Perf Fasteners . They do custom work, and are helpful with tech problems.

zonie77
12-23-03, 11:55 AM
If you can get the thread area welded it's about an inch below the deck. It may not warp the block signifigantly. It would have to be checked of course.


If you don't have any welding shops near you try some of the speed shops doing block work through the internet. At least you'll get an opinion and maybe another option.

There are more and more speciality glues available, maybe there is something better than JB Weld. I've used a thread repair system years ago but it wasn't very strong (repaired thermostat housing threads and it worked OK). There should be an improved version out by now.

Aurora By Olds
12-31-03, 12:38 AM
Well, its all back together with JB weld, vin 9 cams, and I also added a punched out CAT for the time being.
so far its working wonderfully (only drove it about 10 miles so far, and taking it easy of course)
Im having problems refilling my A/C, as the clutch wont engage.
All of the wires seems to be connected but the clutch wont engage ont he compressor.
Any ideas on what could be causing this?

zonie77
01-02-04, 01:03 AM
Are you jumping the low pressure switch on the high side? I had trouble filling my brothers. Even when jumping it, it didn't always want to engage the clutch. The AC must use another input to energize the AC clutch.
I had the switch jumpered and eventually (5-20 sec) the clutch engaged. It would instantly disengage when I pulled the jumper.

Aurora By Olds
01-03-04, 11:42 AM
The clutch does engage for a couple of seconds every once in a while. The low side of the system is reading about 47psi, which is where it was originally before I vented it. Since it sat disconnected for about a month, my guess is that it needs to be purged of air before it can take the right amount of refrigerant. I dont know that much about A/C systems, but I do have a couple of buddies in the auto program at the college near me, and when they start their A/C class next semester, I'll just take it in and let it be a donor car for a day (under close supervision, of course).
As for everything else, it has been running great, and temp has been at a steady 195*. So hopefully it works. About another couple hundred miles I'll change the oil, and then maybe start getting on her a little more.

zonie77
01-03-04, 07:01 PM
The reasons you evacuate the system is to keep the moisture from corroding the system internally and to prevent ice from forming internally. It should take a charge without evacuating it. I'll try to look at the manual next time I'm at my brother's house.

ellisss
01-04-04, 04:25 AM
The reasons you evacuate the system is to keep the moisture from corroding the system internally and to prevent ice from forming internally. It should take a charge without evacuating it. I'll try to look at the manual next time I'm at my brother's house.
Don't forget to mention that when water mixes with refrigerant, an acid is formed that readily attacks any aluminum it's exposed to. That is a huge consideration when deciding whether or not to evacuate the system.

:canttalk:

--
Elisss

zonie77
01-04-04, 12:18 PM
Thanks Ellisss, I was tired and didn't feel like typing the extra words!
The reason the moisture corrodes the system internally is the acid it forms, so corrosion is very fast and can be very severe.