: Wheres the engine block heater?



Jon
12-06-05, 09:12 PM
Hi guys, I've been lookin under the hood of my V and I can't find it. Not even sure if it's equipped with it. Can someone tell me where it would be if my car has it?

Lindsay Cadillac
12-06-05, 09:37 PM
Block heater isn't standard... It was an option that you could get...

Jon
12-06-05, 09:49 PM
Block heater isn't standard... It was an option that you could get...
Hi James, yes I understand that it was an option in the US. I boughth my car used, so I'm not sure if i have it or not.

c5racr1
12-06-05, 10:00 PM
if you dont see it you probably dont have it

Jon
12-06-05, 10:01 PM
if you dont see it you probably dont have it
Ok. Cuz I couldn't find it on my V6 either, and my dealer had to find it for me lol

Lindsay Cadillac
12-06-05, 10:04 PM
Hi James, yes I understand that it was an option in the US. I boughth my car used, so I'm not sure if i have it or not.
If you give me your VIN I can run your vehicle build list...

Jon
12-06-05, 10:29 PM
If you give me your VIN I can run your vehicle build list...
Thanks James, I'll send you a PM.

arr0gant
12-07-05, 12:09 PM
Whats the engine heater for? Warm up the engine faster in cold weather? Do i have it? Is it something that really works well and is recommended? My VIN IS: 1G6DN57S140185840

Thanks!!

Lindsay Cadillac
12-07-05, 12:29 PM
Whats the engine heater for? Warm up the engine faster in cold weather? Do i have it? Is it something that really works well and is recommended? My VIN IS: 1G6DN57S140185840

Thanks!!
When plugged in it keeps the engine coolant at a set temperature reducing engine warm-up time. The option code is K05 and according to your VIN your vehicle does not have it...

arr0gant
12-07-05, 12:52 PM
When plugged in it keeps the engine coolant at a set temperature reducing engine warm-up time. The option code is K05 and according to your VIN your vehicle does not have it...

Thank you so much for checking, GOD this forum is awsum!!!

Is this something I can easily add on, how much $$$? Is it ok to drive off at low RPM's when the car is cold? If not, where should I wait for the guage to be before I drive off?

Thanks so much,
Arr0gant

patentguy
12-07-05, 04:20 PM
I would like to see a picture of what it looks like. Anyone have it on their V that would be willing to post a picture?

Lindsay Cadillac
12-07-05, 09:44 PM
We haven't installed one yet... We have one on order right now. We'll post pictures once we have it in hand.

Maybe we'll even install it in one of the V's we have sitting around the shop during the day... :D

GOTTSPD
12-07-05, 10:35 PM
Hey, I thought that one was ear marked for me!

:)

Let me know what you think when you get it. I hate the idea of having to start up this massive engine when it's so cold out...

patentguy
12-08-05, 09:37 AM
How hard would it be to install one?

arr0gant
12-08-05, 03:04 PM
How much easier does the car warm up WITH this? Is it really worth it for cold weather? How much is it parts and labor?

odysseus
12-08-05, 03:18 PM
It's very common for folks who live in the Northern parts (where it gets below 0) to install these in trucks and cars. Even JCWhitney sells them.

Other warmer kits I've seen include a stick on heater pad for the oil pan and the battery, since the starter draws much more current to start a cold engine, and a battery puts out less when it's that cold. Dyno oil flows like molassas in a cold engine. I'm not sure it applies to, or is needed for, Mobil1, though.

So you guys with V's actually drive them in below freezing weather (i.e., it's your primary daily driver)??? 400HP and ice don't seem to mix, IMHO. I would have thought if it's that nasty out, you guys would have a family 4x4 to venture out in. I take my Jeep when the weather is that nasty here in VA.

arr0gant
12-08-05, 03:21 PM
Jeep is a great idea. I've been looking for one. In the mean-time, should I get the block-heater installed?

Jon
12-08-05, 03:27 PM
It's very common for folks who live in the Northern parts (where it gets below 0) to install these in trucks and cars. Even JCWhitney sells them.

Other warmer kits I've seen include a stick on heater pad for the oil pan and the battery, since the starter draws much more current to start a cold engine, and a battery puts out less when it's that cold. Dyno oil flows like molassas in a cold engine. I'm not sure it applies to, or is needed for, Mobil1, though.

So you guys with V's actually drive them in below freezing weather (i.e., it's your primary daily driver)??? 400HP and ice don't seem to mix, IMHO. I would have thought if it's that nasty out, you guys would have a family 4x4 to venture out in. I take my Jeep when the weather is that nasty here in VA.
I have another car to drive, but, on ok days, I'll drive the V.. Hehe, I'm up in Ontario.

http://img315.imageshack.us/img315/8192/img34250ky.jpg

Got some Blizaaks for the winter on winter rims

a64pilot
12-08-05, 03:34 PM
How much easier does the car warm up WITH this? Is it really worth it for cold weather? How much is it parts and labor?
IF you really want to pre-heat the engine, I would install the heater that goes in the heater hose. It circulates warm water throughout the engine and heater core thereby slightly raising the temp inside of the car. You do not want to run any pre-heater continously though. The warm engine over time will form condensation inside of it from cold air. If you run a pre-heater I would recomend a high amp timer that can be bought at Walmart or elsewhere, usually made for coffee pots etc. Set it to turn on a couple of hours before you start the car. The most important thing is to make sure you route the cord so that it will be unpluged without damaging anything when you forget to and drive off with the car still plugged in. Having said all this I don't believe it's necessary on a spark ignition engine running synthetic oil at all. My experience with pre-heating comes from aircraft and diesel engines.

Joey'sVee
12-08-05, 03:47 PM
I thought the only factory option was the roof. The dealer installed options were corsa, fg2, cross drilled brakes, & optional wheels, right?

slk230mb
12-08-05, 04:09 PM
I thought the only factory option was the roof. The dealer installed options were corsa, fg2, cross drilled brakes, & optional wheels, right?

I think RPO K05 was available as the engine block heater.

ctsvett
12-08-05, 04:16 PM
I dont know that any 2004 Vs shipped with this option.. I remember that some people here said they were orderd, but there was a shortage of the part so they never shipped... I dont know about 2005....

Someone post here and tell me if I am wrong...

Now, I didnt know you could order it and install it aftermarket. I thought it would require drilling out/ removing a freeze plug...

Reed

Slapshot
12-08-05, 04:30 PM
I would hazard a guess that all Cadillac's built for the Canadian market come with a block heater standard. Our Escalade did...

If you bought your CTS used, take a good look underneath for the cord. Usually front left side behind the bumper... You may have to look in the wheel well towards the front bumper...

The previous owner may have just left the cord to "dangle" beneath the car after the winter. The friction against the road surface could have abraded the plug off the end of the cord. (It happened to me on my used car when I went looking for the cord to plug in for a cold winter evening...)

The dealer just put a new cord on, rather than replace the whole unit.

ewill3rd
12-08-05, 06:03 PM
There is a screw in plug that you can remove and thread the heater into.
I forget where it is, I looked it up yesterday, I think it goes in the left side of the block towards the front, but I could be mistaken.
It shouldn't take much time to put one in.

StealthV
12-08-05, 07:42 PM
When I ordered my '05 in April of 2004, I had the block heater option on the original order sheet. As it got closer to production, the option was cancelled by GM.

In past years on other cars, I've had the block heater plugged in while sitting in the garage. Toasty warm air when you first leave in the morning is nice.

These Gen III engines warm up extremely fast. Just take it easy the first few minutes and you'll be fine. The 5W-30 Mobil1 synthetic oil flows very well at low temps.

Another thought is have a progressive time and engine coolant temperature dependent rev limiter added to the PCM. ;)

Jon
12-08-05, 08:12 PM
I would hazard a guess that all Cadillac's built for the Canadian market come with a block heater standard. Our Escalade did...

If you bought your CTS used, take a good look underneath for the cord. Usually front left side behind the bumper... You may have to look in the wheel well towards the front bumper...

The previous owner may have just left the cord to "dangle" beneath the car after the winter. The friction against the road surface could have abraded the plug off the end of the cord. (It happened to me on my used car when I went looking for the cord to plug in for a cold winter evening...)

The dealer just put a new cord on, rather than replace the whole unit.
Thanks. Yes, it is standard in Canada, but I bought my car from Michigan. James ran my VIN for me, turns out my car didn't have the option :(

rand49er
12-08-05, 08:24 PM
Don't mean to hijack your thread here, Jon, but Slapshot's avatar needs to be addressed ... WHOA, BABY!!! If I watch it long enough, I'd swear the blackout bar doesn't quite cover everything every time. Hmm-m ... maybe I should check out it again and see.:yup: You guys just keep talking about whatever you were talking about ...

ewill3rd
12-09-05, 08:57 AM
I saw the unedited version once. It's something to behold.

Aside from that, I think we are planning to install one for one of our V customers. I'll pass along the info if I do the job.
;)

BeagleBrains
12-09-05, 04:30 PM
Yes. The Block Heater is a listed CTS V Option. It is installed in one of the "Freeze Plug" insert points. Very good response; best to limit a Block Heater operation as this can contribute to condensation which degrades the oil in the crank case. I have used a lower heater hose installed heater. This is much more effective in that it causes a percolation/reciculation cycle, much like a coffee maker. This warms the engine more uniformly.
I live in Iowa. I start my car in the morning with outside temperature at below zero. I have heat eminating into the people compartment before I reach the end of my 40 foot driveway.
Dragsters, race cars, etc. use a quick connect coolant heater/recirculation system to bring the engine up to operating temperature prior to starting the engine. For race cars, where clearances are tighter, it is much better for the engine to run only at operating temperature; thus limiting the actual running time, in order to reduce the severe duty and wear on engine internals. If you truely were a fanatic, you would plug in the engine block heater every day of the year. The greatest wear is due to starting a 70 degree engine and cycling it over a very wide temperature range, greatly stressing moving parts.
I work in a power plant. We have two large 3 megawatt (3000 KW) Diesel Generators. They are maintained at normal operating temperature by very large coolant and oil recirculation heating systems. They can come up to operating speed and tie in on their electrical bus in thirty seconds. They are 12 cylinder/opposed 24 piston diesel engines that are supercharged and turbo charged for high specific electrical output. Works fine, last a long time.

ewill3rd
12-09-05, 08:11 PM
Here is the image they give in the replacement procedure for the heater.
You didn't get this from me....:halo:

patentguy
12-09-05, 09:49 PM
Thank you!

BeagleBrains
12-10-05, 06:25 PM
There is a screw in plug that you can remove and thread the heater into.
I forget where it is, I looked it up yesterday, I think it goes in the left side of the block towards the front, but I could be mistaken.
It shouldn't take much time to put one in.
Most engine blocks have multiple freeze plugs. These are designed so that, if the coolant freezes, they will pop out to prevent the block from splitting wide open. The are usually an expansion device. Replacement freeze plugs work like a thermos bottle plug, wherre tightening a center bolt expands the plug to lock in.

rand49er
12-11-05, 03:21 PM
These are designed so that, if the coolant freezes, they will pop out to prevent the block from splitting wide open.I was told by a customer in a Daimler-Chrysler engine plant that though they're called "freeze plugs", they're primary reason for existing is to allow sand to be removed from the water jackets after the casting process. Take it for what it's worth ... Randy.

ewill3rd
12-11-05, 03:52 PM
According to Service Information the factory option heater threds into a threaded hole in the side of the block.
It also looks like the cord is an additional purchase. It says in Description and operation that you can remove the cord for safe storage when you don't need it.
I haven't noticed freeze plugs in the side of any engine blocks lately. When I get a chance I'll take a better look.
I think anymore they limit them to the front and rear of the block for structural purposes.

Here is a link to a photo of a Corvette motor, you can see the heater installed right behind the power steering pump and in front of the motor mount brace.
TAKE A LOOK HERE (http://media.gm.com/us/powertrain/en/product_services/Photo%20Library/Gen%20IV/GenIV%20Car/06%206.0L%20V8%20LS2%20COR%20LoR.jpg)

ewill3rd
12-11-05, 04:01 PM
Here is a picture of a "block plug".
You can see the side of the engine, there are no freeze plugs as you might compare them with the plugs of days gone by.
The Gen III and IV small blocks have several of these screw in type plugs in the water jacket and a couple of plugs in the oil gallery passages but I don't see any press in plugs.

BeagleBrains
12-12-05, 01:03 PM
I was told by a customer in a Daimler-Chrysler engine plant that though they're called "freeze plugs", they're primary reason for existing is to allow sand to be removed from the water jackets after the casting process. Take it for what it's worth ... Randy.
Partly true. I worked in a foundry for a few years. The internal molded passages are formed around an oiled sand that is ejected by huge shaker/agitators at the end of the line. I was a professional "Core Maker". Their function (the 'freeze plugs') provides multiple functions, indeed.
They are not visible in the attachment when I checked the "Look Here" graphic. Don't see much of the engine block. I did see another graphic representing an extention on the block to which the block heater was threaded. This does not appear to be a typical "Freeze Plug" or casting core access port. YES, I understand that designs evolve.

ewill3rd
12-12-05, 01:52 PM
Wasn't trying to argue, I became curious myself because of what you wrote.
I hadn't paid attention to this "evolution".
I just thought I'd share the images I could find. ;)
I am really curious to look at some more now. I don't have any Vs today but I have an XLR on my lift. I know it's a Northstar but I'll take a look just for kicks.

Lindsay Cadillac
12-12-05, 02:14 PM
For anyone that was curious about the block heater I've attached a picture of the heater and of the cord. The heater itself is threaded and screws into the engine block. The cord is detachable if you want to take it off when you're not using it. Although, from looking where this will be mounted I don't know how easy it will be...

Joey'sVee
12-12-05, 02:22 PM
For anyone that was curious about the block heater I've attached a picture of the heater and of the cord. The heater itself is threaded and screws into the engine block. The cord is detachable if you want to take it off when you're not using it. Although, from looking where this will be mounted I don't know how easy it will be...

Just gotta say....you and ewill3rd freaking rock! Y'all are always on top of things and provide this forum with a hell of a lot of helpfull info that would be missing if you guys weren't here!

Thanks! :yup:

ewill3rd
12-12-05, 03:17 PM
Man, he's sneaky! Wouldn't you know he'd take pics and post them.... LOL

Must be nice to be a manager!
;)

ewill3rd
12-13-05, 06:02 PM
I'll post a picture of where it goes!

Here is the block plug you remove to install it. Behind the Alternator on the Driver's side of the engine.
I have one on the lift right now so I thought I'd snap it.

GOTTSPD
12-13-05, 08:21 PM
is this a two second DIY project or are there parts that need to be removed in order to gain access to the connection point? Is it really as simple as unplugging/unscrewing what's there and installing this thing? When you unscrew the plug that's there, is oil or coolant going to come gushing out?

ewill3rd
12-14-05, 07:17 AM
That plug goes into the water jacket, coolant must be drained first.
Also that photo makes it look easy.
It's actually a pretty tight spot. You'd be hard pressed to see that view, my camera barely fit up in there. The right tool combination might be able to get up in there... I suspect someday soon I might just find out.
That setup James posted photos of is for a customer. I can't guarantee it but it's quite likely I am going to be the one to install it.
I'll let you know.

BeagleBrains
12-14-05, 09:11 PM
Wasn't trying to argue, I became curious myself because of what you wrote.
I hadn't paid attention to this "evolution".
I just thought I'd share the images I could find. ;)
I am really curious to look at some more now. I don't have any Vs today but I have an XLR on my lift. I know it's a Northstar but I'll take a look just for kicks.
Thanks. The actual Block Heater connection photo is great. I was intending to obtain a block heater and install it myself. This is very helpful. Thanks for a correct and courteous response. It appears that the threaded plug fitting is specifically designed as a Block Heater connection port.
As mentioned, this here Forum can be a great information tool.

ewill3rd
12-15-05, 07:18 AM
It's hard to tell which came first, the chicken or the egg here.
My suspicion is that since there are a couple of these in the engine block they decided to make the heater fit into the threaded hole.
It's impossible to say. Even the engineers have probably forgotten.
I'll try to give you guys an idea of how hard it is when I do one.
I think I have the bit that fits in the plug there, I'll let you know what size it is also.

ewill3rd
12-31-05, 03:28 PM
It's pretty easy.
I did one this morning. I had to use the biggest metric hex bit I own and borrow some 1/2" drive extensions, but I was able to get in there and put that thing right in.
It was kind of messy because of the coolant going everywhere but I'd say it's an hour job on a lift. In the driveway probably looking at 2 or 3.
Mike will have to report back to let everyone know how well it works for what he wanted it for.
I know sometimes it bums me out to have my heater start working right before I get to work. My commute is pretty short too.

It really is as easy as unscrewing the plug and screwing the new one back in.
Routing the cord was harder but we found a way to make it look nice and the plug comes out in the gap between the 2 front bolts on the air cleaner housing. I think it looks very clean and you can tuck the plug back underneath where you can't even really see it.

DaveBlk
01-02-06, 04:07 PM
For us in Canada this is a must have. 2weeks ago -33 celcius and thank gm for one thing - HEATED SEATS!!!!!!! EVER SIT ON SEATS AT -45!!! Synthetics a must have as is a good winter emergency kit especially when stuck on a unplowed road in 0 visibility!!!:eek: