: Camless engines could boost fuel economy, lower emissions



HotRodSaint
10-31-05, 09:52 AM
So-called camless technology may allow for engines that get as much as 35 percent greater fuel economy than a conventional gasoline engine while lowering engine emissions.
(http://www.autonews.com/article.cms?articleId=55100)

In a camless engine, the valves are opened and closed electronically. Unlike mechanical systems, which give fixed amounts of valve travel and timing, an electrohydraulic device can move valves independently to any lift position for any duration desired.

This gives an opportunity for engine systems to tailor the performance of each piston on every cycle, increasing fuel economy and engine torque while reducing emissions.

Beyond valve adjustment, camless technology could allow for ultralightweight valves because the need to absorb the force and action of rolling camshafts is eliminated.

RobertCTS
10-31-05, 09:57 AM
So-called camless technology may allow for engines that get as much as 35 percent greater fuel economy than a conventional gasoline engine while lowering engine emissions. (http://www.autonews.com/article.cms?articleId=55100)
(http://www.autonews.com/article.cms?articleId=55100)

In a camless engine, the valves are opened and closed electronically. Unlike mechanical systems, which give fixed amounts of valve travel and timing, an electrohydraulic device can move valves independently to any lift position for any duration desired.

This gives an opportunity for engine systems to tailor the performance of each piston on every cycle, increasing fuel economy and engine torque while reducing emissions.

Beyond valve adjustment, camless technology could allow for ultralightweight valves because the need to absorb the force and action of rolling camshafts is eliminated.

Very intersting HRS. A step beyond Caddy's VVT. Us shade tree mechanics are lost in the new technologies!

HotRodSaint
10-31-05, 10:01 AM
Very intersting HRS. A step beyond Caddy's VVT. Us shade tree mechanics are lost in the new technologies!

But imagine the tuning possibilites, once a computer reprogram would be all you'd need to change the 'cam'!!

RobertCTS
10-31-05, 10:05 AM
But imagine the tuning possibilites, once a computer reprogram would be all you'd need to change the 'cam'!!

I agree but a company like Cadillac, like on the 3.6 VVT engine, make it impossible for us to modify it...bastards!

ShadowLvr400
10-31-05, 03:35 PM
With no mechanical way to open and shut valves, I see more power being drawn here, a slew of electronic things to go wrong, and real issues with dead batteries/jump starting cars. But maybe I'm just a realist, err cynic. :P

ben72227
10-31-05, 06:22 PM
Yeah, thats the main problem with camless engines from what I've read - the battery power needed for them. I think a normal car needs 12V, while a camless engine needs up to 48V in some cases:bighead:

dbdartman
10-31-05, 06:30 PM
Hasn't F-1 been using this technology for about 8-10 years now?

Shadow, your energy usage concerns are valid, but I've heard that the auto makers have already decided to upgrade auto electrics to 36 volt systems & they should be appearing in the next 2-3 years.

After this system has been in use for a few years, I can see great things from it. I mean, can you imagine... a "cam change" is as difficult as plugging a laptop or PDA into the car.

davesdeville
11-01-05, 06:48 AM
I don't see why it would be worthwhile in any racing unless fuel consumption is a big issue. You can open a valve far enough to hit a piston with a regular ass cam.

I can't wait until the ricers get ahold of this, "the ultimate VTEC."