: My Nitrous project is under way...



Mark Bunds
08-29-05, 12:52 PM
I have decided to spray my 2001 STS with wet nitrous that I am assembling from component parts rather than using a kit. I will post the details of the installation process, along with photos, as soon as I have collected all of the parts. So far, I have aquired the following components:

1 10 lb NOS Bottle
14 ft. Steel Braided Supply line
1 Inline Nitrous Filter Fitting
1 NOS No. 16080 Fuel Powershot Solonoid with Fuel Filter
1 NOS No. 16000 Nitrous Cheater Solonoid
1 NOS No. 16050 Fuel Solonoid
2 24" Steel Braided Supply lines
1 Power Wing Wet Fogger Nozzle

I will need to collect the following components in order to begin the project:

1 Purge solonoid
1 or Two Purge Nozzles
1 Purge Tee Fitting
1 RPM Window Switch
1 Fuel Pressure Switch
1 Nitrous pressure switch
1 Arming Switch
1 WOT Switch
1 Pressure triggered Bottle Warmer
1 Blowoff Safety Adapter
1 Remote Bottle Opener
1 Fuel Rail Test Port Adapter Fitting
1 Bottle Mounting Kit
3 Fuel Jets, .020, .023, .028
3 Nitrous Jets .034, .040, .048
1 24" Steel Braided supply line
1 Bottle Adapter with Guage
1 Digital Cockpit Guage
1 System Armed LED (Yellow)
1 N2O "Pressure Good" LED (Blue)
1 RPM Window Active LED (Green)
1 "Nitrous Flowing" LED (Flashing Green)
1 "Bottle Open" LED (Green)
1 Solonoid Relay
Various Fittings/Wire

I will be working from basic instructions given by John Williamson at http://www.dynopower.freeserve.co.uk/nitrous_oxide/, including the technique of jetting the nitrous and fuel at the solonoids rather than at the nozzle. Mr. Williamson describes some very good reasons for doing this, and also describes his method of modifying industrial gas solonoids for nitrous use, and making his own jets.
I will be using commercially available NOS solonoids and jets since they can be found reasonably priced on eBay.

My first task is to collect all of the parts, of course, and then figure out where to mount the cockpit controls without damaging the stock interior. I am examining the space with the flip-up door beneath the radio as a possible
place to mount the arming switch, bottle opener switch, digital pressure guage, purge button, and diagnostic/status LED's. I have an OBDII scan tool for my laptop (ELM Scanner) and software that will allow me to balance the fuel/nitrous jets by monitoring the O2 sensors and ignition advance.

I will be installing redundant safety systems to protect the engine, and will inhibit the operation of the solonoids if either the fuel/nitrous pressures are out of range, or when the RPM window is below 3000 RPM, or above 7000, if the ECU cuts the fuel at RPM limit, or if excessive knock is detected.

After installing the system, I intend to begin adding power starting with the .020 fuel jet, and the .034 nitrous jet which, at 43 psi fuel pressure, should give me around 50 BHP.

I will be running on 5 gallons of 97 octane unleaded, with 1 1/2 quarts of toluene to bring the octane up to around 100.

My scanner software includes a drag timer, and rudementary dyno screens. I will make base runs after measuring ambient temp, track temp, and barometeric pressure without the system armed, and then comparison runs with the system armed. Don't expect to see great reaction times; I am not very experienced at drag racing so I expect to see some rather below-average 0-60 times at the track. I do hope there are some ricers there that day.

After verifying performance improvements with the 50 shot, I will install the 75 HP jets, re-run the tests, and then jet up to 100.

Well, back to the parts hunt. Wish me luck.

danbuc
08-29-05, 01:25 PM
Sounds liek you got quite the project going here. Be sure to let us know when you get everything together. If you can, take some pictures of the install too.

weister42
08-29-05, 04:26 PM
WOW you might wanna get some better rubber for the extra 100+HP to the front wheels...I suppose this do not apply to earlier N* with higher compression ratio?

Mark Bunds
08-29-05, 07:18 PM
WOW you might wanna get some better rubber for the extra 100+HP to the front wheels...I suppose this do not apply to earlier N* with higher compression ratio?

You actually have an advantage if you own an earlier OBDI system, since you have control over your ignition advance curve using aftermarket performance chips. The 10.3:1 compression of the earlier northstars merely will require you to retard your timing a few degrees to avoid knock when using above a 50 shot. And you certainly will want to run the highest octane fuel available to you. A wet nitrous system appears to be the safest and simplest since it provides its own fuel. Dry systems can be limited by the stock injectors, and the inability of the stock ECU to compensate with enough fuel at higher nitrous injection rates. I decided not to modify my stock injectors or fuel pressure, since doing so would mess up the driveability of my car when not running nitrous, especially since I have no way the change the maps in my ECU.

Does anyone know if the stock Northstar pistons are forged aluminum?

Mark Bunds
08-30-05, 11:35 AM
Some of the little expenses that can add up real quickly are the fittings needed to connect the steel braided hoses to the system. NOS is asking for between $9.00 and $19.00 for simple flared Tee's, couplings, and NPT/Flare fittings. A little research discovers that these fittings ar no more than brake line fittings, many of which come in blue anodized aluminum, exactly like the NOS fittings, for less than 1/3 of the price. Typically the threads in a fuel or nitrous solonoid are 1/8" or 1/4" N.P.T., depending on the flow, and the flares are simply AN3 or AN4, the "3" designation meaning 3/16", and the "4" designation meaning 1/4". So, an AN3 to AN3 to 1/8" NPT Tee costs a mere $6.00 or less when bought as a brake part, and the smaller fittings cost between $3.00 and $4.00.

I am working out the electrical schematic for the system, simple as it is, but I intend to include all of the engine protection devices possible. The first device in the circuit will be the arming switch.

All nitrous systems I have ever seen are series wired, meaning that any safety device in the circuit can open the circuit and stop the flow of nitrous and fuel, as when the driver releases the throttle, or fuel pressure drops below a set point, or the RPM limit is about to cut fuel.

The problem is, these same devices can re-establish the circuit and resume the flow if an error condition clears itself, such as can happen if a fuel pressure switch begins to fail, or the window switch shorts internally. One of the worst scenarios I can imagine (besides an extreme lean condition caused by lack of fuel) is if the nitrous and fuel flow became "stuck" on because of a failed closed switch.

This is why I am debating whether or not to use a latch circuit for control over the system power. This would mean that the arming switch supplies power to the system, and a pushbutton "engages" the system, truly arming for action. Any number of events could break the latch, shutting down the system, including tapping the brakes.

I know what you're thinking; if I wire the system to shut down when the brake pedal is depressed, how will I power brake to get off the line, and have the nitrous kick in at WOT above 3000 RPM? Using relay ladder logic, I can have the brake switch checked when the system is engaged, if the brake is on, the system will engage, likewise if the brake is off. But if the brake transitions from off to on, it will disengage the system.

This will allow me to depress the brake when the car is staged, and engage the nitrous, release the brakes, launch at WOT, nitrous kicks in around 3000 RPM via the window switch, and nitrous kicks off if either I release the accelerator, or hit the brakes.

The nitrous and fuel would also kick off if a number of other things happen, like the WOT switch transitions from on to off, or if the window switch sees the RPM getting above or below to its limit, or if the fuel flow to the fogger begins to fail, and it would not kick back in unless the error is cleared, and the engage button is pressed again. Redundant devices would further prevent disasters caused by stuck switches; dual fuel pressure switches before and after the fuel solonoid, wired in series, the second one ignored like the brake pedal when the system is engaged, becoming active when the fuel pressure checks good by the first switch. Dual WOT switches, wired in series. Perhaps even an O2 monitor that shuts the system down if it detects a lean condition for any reason (clogged fogger nozzle?) And no devices would be activated by connecting any part of the circuit to ground as I have seen in some other systems; this is a recipe for disaster. The system I am considering would require a minorly complex set of relays, or I might go as far as wiring together a solid-state controller using a few logic gates, but a fail-safe system is worth having to protect this expensive engine.

caddydaddy
08-30-05, 12:26 PM
Does anyone know if the stock Northstar pistons are forged aluminum?

I believe the 2004-up Northstars do use forged pistons.

davesdeville
08-31-05, 06:57 AM
*blinks*

I think I'll just get a kit. Maybe you should write a book or something Mark.

Mark Bunds
08-31-05, 03:46 PM
I have found the perfect controller. This device, the Automation Direct DL-05 is a full-featured industrial programmable logic controller. It comes in several configurations that allow a choice of power supplies, AC or DC inputs/outputs, etc. The particular model I have chosen will operate on 12 VDC, and uses 8 DC inputs, and 6 DC or Relay outputs, depending on the 12 V model chosen.

This device is as capable as any nitrous controller around, and only costs $112.00. The downside is that it will require special programming software and a cable which adds another $75.00 to the price, but I already have those because I program units like this at work.

The unit is small enough to sit in the palm of your hand, but it has 2 RS-232 ports, 2 high-speed counter inputs good to 5 khz, and it does interger math.

It will work as a window switch if I can get the engine speed pulses into the high-speed counter input, and then activate the outputs connected to the fuel and nitrous solonoids based on a certain RPM range programmed into memory. It is also the perfect solution to my latched system, and will handle power braking via programming. It can output messages like RPM's and system status to an LCD display, and at the same time with the help of an ELM scan it might be able to monitor the OBDII system for oxygen sensor readings or other useful data for program processing or data display.

It has enough inputs to handle all of the safety devices and control switches, and enough outputs to control fuel, nitrous, bottle heat, bottle opening, bottle closing, and status lights. And it has a single expansion slot if I need to add more I/O. The model with DC outputs could even toggle the solonoids fast enough for multi-staged nitrous feeding using a PID loop based on O2 readings!

The downside to the outputs is that the relay types will only handle 2 amps, and the DC type will only handle 1/2 amp, meaning that I will have to drive a larger current source like another relay or solid-state switch to control the high current devices like the solonoids, heater, and bottle opener. Also, the relay type outputs could not be used reliably to pulse the solonoids for stage control, however the DC output type would be perfect for this, when driving a solid-state relay.

This will be my system controller. It is cheap, powerful, and I will have complete control over its functions.

lry99eldo
09-03-05, 11:49 AM
Just a note on Mark Bunds suggestion on brake line fittings and AN fittings. Although they can work together their is a possible leak source in mating a SAE 45 deg flair to an AN 37 deg flair. Also, brake fittings are SAE steel/stainless as opposed to most aftermarket AN fuel fittings being aluminum. True, they do manufacture in brass, steel, stainless, and aluminum, just try not to mix them. Steel to aluminum will seal only once in most cases and the aluminum part will need at least inspection before refastening.
AN = 37 deg flare, SAE (brake line fittings) = 45 deg flare. Use steel to steel or aluminum to aluminum where ever possible and don't over tighten either one, that's the concept of the flare is to easily mate and seal.
Have fun and remember to never arm system BEFORE you start the engine! KABOOM!
lry99eldo

weister42
09-08-05, 12:55 PM
How's the project going?

Mark Bunds
09-09-05, 08:05 PM
I have collected the Nitrous Valve and a spare fuel valve, and ordered the PLC that I will use as a controller. I decided to use an Automation Direct DL-06 instead of the 05 because it is a much more capable unit.

It will do floating-point math as well as PID which should make metering a lot more accurate.

It also has 4 expansion slots, two of which I filled with one 4 DC in/4 DC out I/O card, and one 8-point Relay output card. The unit already has 20 DC inputs, and 16 DC outputs, so now I have 24 in and 28 out, plus 2 slots left over.

The DL-06 also has a real-time clock, and a place to plug in a 2-line by 16 character LCD display, which I also ordered.

It has 4 high-speed counter inputs, one of which I will use to read engine RPM and program my window switch.

It can pulse the DC outputs up to 500 HZ, which should be more than enough to meter fuel and nitrous using a programmed PWM scheme.

I can vary parameters using a simple keypad strip mounted below the unit, and I should have plenty of outputs to use for indicator and system status lights. I plan to eventually install an analog card to read the O2 sensors and apply some PID routines to help balance the flow of fuel to nitrous.

I am collecting the last of the plumbing components next week, and will begin installing and documenting the project the following week.

chevelle
09-09-05, 11:45 PM
FYI...none of the Northstars have forged pistons. All of the pistons in production engines are cast pistons almost without exception throughout the industry.


You did not specifically mention spark plugs. DEFINITELY get colder plugs as the engine will need them for preignition protection at the higher power output levels. Reduce the spark plug gap to about .040 and shorten the ground electrodes considerably by clipping and filing smooth. The ground electrodes should project only enough to reach the side of the center electrode. You will have to forgo dual platinum plugs for the colder heat range and for modifying the ground electrodes.

The colder and modified plugs are probably the most important "protection" for the engine that you can provide for this type of development project. The engine will tend to force the spark plugs to overheat simply by making more power so the colder plugs are necessary regardless. If the engine should lean out or make more power (due to lack/loss of nitrous control) the cold plugs may be the only thing preventing runaway detonation and resulting preignition that will destroy the engine.

Anytime you dive into a project like this always start with the coldest plugs you can possibly find to provide insurance against preignition until you get the package sorted out. Then you can start easing up on the plugs and start to get a better read on the heat range. If the plugs are not fouling...leave the coldest possible plugs in it, period.

Mark Bunds
09-10-05, 01:02 PM
FYI...none of the Northstars have forged pistons. All of the pistons in production engines are cast pistons almost without exception throughout the industry.


You did not specifically mention spark plugs. DEFINITELY get colder plugs as the engine will need them for preignition protection at the higher power output levels. Reduce the spark plug gap to about .040 and shorten the ground electrodes considerably by clipping and filing smooth. The ground electrodes should project only enough to reach the side of the center electrode. You will have to forgo dual platinum plugs for the colder heat range and for modifying the ground electrodes.

The colder and modified plugs are probably the most important "protection" for the engine that you can provide for this type of development project. The engine will tend to force the spark plugs to overheat simply by making more power so the colder plugs are necessary regardless. If the engine should lean out or make more power (due to lack/loss of nitrous control) the cold plugs may be the only thing preventing runaway detonation and resulting preignition that will destroy the engine.

Anytime you dive into a project like this always start with the coldest plugs you can possibly find to provide insurance against preignition until you get the package sorted out. Then you can start easing up on the plugs and start to get a better read on the heat range. If the plugs are not fouling...leave the coldest possible plugs in it, period.

Thank you very, very much for this information! And also to the reader who pointed out the specifics of the different AN fittings. I have read a little about modifying the spark plugs, and your information provides one less research step. Thanks again!

Mark Bunds
09-10-05, 08:13 PM
Here is a picture of the DL-06 PLC with the LCD installed on the unit. I will move the LCD to a panel beneath the "ash tray" door where it can display arming status, RPM, O2, etc., while allowing me to adjust the flow or window switch parameters with the buttons on the LCD panel. I can also use the RS-232 DB15 connector to communicate with a built-in ELM Scan if I wish. This will be a sweet setup.

davesdeville
09-11-05, 07:09 AM
This will be a sweet setup.

Damn straight it will. I am in awe of your devotion to this project. I'd have given up and bought an off the shelf kit a long time ago in your position.

http://www.hfboards.com/images/smilies/bowdown.gif

Mark Bunds
09-12-05, 11:32 AM
I have another question that someone in the know might be able to answer. The 2001 STS Northstar has no spark plug wires, but uses ignition modules on each spark plug instead. Does the ECM still use a "waste spark" scheme on this setup, or are the spark modules triggered sequentially, one at a time, like the fuel injectors? I am asking because I need to tap a pulse train to sense engine RPM by the PLC. The OBDII bus can provide this information, but I don't think it will update as fast as the PLC will reading the pulses directly. The PLC will count pulses every 1/100 of a second, but I need to know whether to expect a pulse every revolution (waste spark), or every other revolution (sequential spark). Or perhaps it would be better to tap the pulse to one of the fuel injectors? The math suggests that if I get a pulse on every other revolution, I can count pulses for .01 seconds, and multiply the result by 200 to arrive at the actual RPM. The problem is that the PLC only has a resolution on the high speed counter of 7 KHZ, giving me a reliable limit of 7000 RPM depending on the pulse width (50% duty-cycle pulse), but the engine shifts slightly over 7000 RPM at times. Therefore, it would be far better to count pulses arriving at every other revolution, giving me an effective range of 14000 RPM, which would be far more than enough. This information will allow me to program the window switch routines.

Any thoughts would be helpful.

lry99eldo
09-12-05, 02:07 PM
Wouldn't it be best to pick up your information at the cranktrigger (transducer)? Wouldn't that give you true RPM? Or is that what you mean by tapping into the PLC at that station? Something has to trigger correct crank position in order to release the signal, right? So why not at the base so you don't have to tweak anything.
lry99eldo

Mark Bunds
09-12-05, 02:34 PM
Wouldn't it be best to pick up your information at the cranktrigger (transducer)? Wouldn't that give you true RPM? Or is that what you mean by tapping into the PLC at that station? Something has to trigger correct crank position in order to release the signal, right? So why not at the base so you don't have to tweak anything.
lry99eldo

The crank trigger would seem to be the logical place to pick up the pulse, but I fear that the pulse width may be too narrow at max RPM, not to mention the bandwidth limitation of the high-speed counter in the PLC being 7 KHZ. The Northstar can rev above 7000 RPM at times, so it would be better to pick up a pulse from a component that delivers a pulse on every other revolution. That would bring the bandwidth down to 3500 ppm @ 7000 RPM, well within the range of the counter. Since the PLC inputs are high-impedance, there is little chance that tapping an injector, for example, would interfere with the high-current 12V pulse used to operate it. If the injectors, or the spark modules are truly sequential, each one would receive a pulse at every other revolution, since in one revolution a cylinder is at its power stroke, and at the next it is at its exhaust stroke. If the system uses a waste spark, it fires each revolution into two cylinders in opposing stroke positions, one at its power stroke, and one at its exhaust stroke.

lry99eldo
09-12-05, 04:00 PM
Ahhhhhhhh, OK. Yeah, that too. So, what's the problem? Let us know how it all works out.
lry99eldo

Mark Bunds
09-12-05, 11:35 PM
O.K. So now I have to buy an oscilloscope. It be be invaluable in reading the pulses at various points in the wire harness and finding the right one. I really should have one already, but with todays computers running at a gazillian HZ, it would cost a fortune to have one with sufficient bandwidth. Besides, what's the point in probing a board these days? Most modern PC boards are throw-aways.

But, for automotive work, a nice little dual-trace 20 MHZ rig would do just fine, and yes, I can see all eight high-tension (spark voltage) levels with the right multiplexer on one channel, and compare trigger pulses on the other. I'm thinking a used Tenma from eBay, of course...

Mark Bunds
09-24-05, 02:09 AM
Sorry about my lapse, but I had to go to Iowa for a few days to buy some machinery. I took my STS of course, for her first road trip since I bought her, and let me tell you, she is sweet! No sign of "65 mph shimmy," she's just smooth as glass on good highways, at all speeds up to where my sense of survival kicks in.

But, I digress. I bought TWO oscilloscopes from eBay, one Tektronix 4-channel (100 mhz, I think; .05 uS per division), and one portable B&K 20 mhz 2-channel that incidently runs on 12 VDC, how convenient!

These will help me to examine the various pulses and oxygen sensor outputs so I can make intellegent decisions about how and what to feed to the PLC inputs.

Now, some of you have indicated a certain amount of fear concerning the complexity of this project, but I assure you that when it is complete it will be very simple for any of you to install and program, and in fact you could do fine with the lesser PLC, the tiny DL-05, for use as a window switch/nitrous controller. I have choosen the DL-06 for it's more sophisticated features, like the LCD display.

After some experimentation, I may even be able to make the PLC's talk to the OBDII bus. Imagine the implications here, like the ability to directly measure the systems with the PLC, and then compare the the results with a query of the OBDII system; redundant diagnostics with a simple warning from the PLC screen in plain english! And if I get into the real black magic of the ECU, I may be able to provide a simple and cheap solution for turbo or superchargers that would require no modifications to the ECU programming itself. I might be able to hijack certain functions from the ECU, while telling it with the PLC that all is well; no DTC's!

I am assembling an album of photos of parts, equipment, and procedures, and I will share it with you all shortly.

Wishing all the folks in the Texas shores, and the folks in New Orleans the best of luck,

Mark Bunds

AlBundy
09-24-05, 07:12 PM
I wish you the best of luck, hope everything works out just the way you plan. Its a very exciting project.

ShadowLvr400
09-24-05, 10:11 PM
A few things as a nitrous northstar veteran... Since you have the hardware pretty well ironed out it looks like, some safety tips. 1, if possible, make it so you can't spray down low, anywhere below 3k rpms, and you'll likely eject your MAF like I did. (125 wet shot, direct port) 2, keep that nitrous tank full, otherwise you can end up flooding and stalling the car. 3, run high test or even a bit of race fuel in there. The extra compression makes pinging possible on anything but 93+ 4, if you spring a leak at any time, close the tank and purge the system, do NOT try to seal an active leak. Nitrous burns, and it's a frozen burn that shuts down the nerves quick, hard to force your hand to release. On a side note, be prepared to be addicted, and burn through the tanks quickly. I was a tank a week habit... 10lb tank. Either keep 1 or 2 full spares around, or step to a 20 lb tank and a warmer.

Mark Bunds
09-26-05, 05:56 PM
A few things as a nitrous northstar veteran... Since you have the hardware pretty well ironed out it looks like, some safety tips. 1, if possible, make it so you can't spray down low, anywhere below 3k rpms, and you'll likely eject your MAF like I did. (125 wet shot, direct port) 2, keep that nitrous tank full, otherwise you can end up flooding and stalling the car. 3, run high test or even a bit of race fuel in there. The extra compression makes pinging possible on anything but 93+ 4, if you spring a leak at any time, close the tank and purge the system, do NOT try to seal an active leak. Nitrous burns, and it's a frozen burn that shuts down the nerves quick, hard to force your hand to release. On a side note, be prepared to be addicted, and burn through the tanks quickly. I was a tank a week habit... 10lb tank. Either keep 1 or 2 full spares around, or step to a 20 lb tank and a warmer.

Thank you so much for your input. This information confirms the necessity of safety devices in the nitrous control system. I knew the inhibition of the nitrous flow below 3000 RPM was important, which is why I started looking into window switches and nitrous controllers. A dedicated unit is certainly simpler than the PLC route I have chosen, but nitrous controllers are rather expensive, and not very flexible. A PLC on the other hand is very flexible, and gives you absolute control over the programming.

I intend to install a pressure switch on both the nitrous and fuel lines, and feed the signals to the PLC. This will allow me to inhibit or cancel the flow of nitrous and fuel if the pressure of one or the other falls below a certain setpoint.

I plan to heed your warning about avoiding skin contact with leaking nitrous. That kind of frostbite is never good.

I'm glad to know that I can work up to a 125 shot; It seemed risky until I heard from an experienced Northstar nitrous user, so thanks again.

ShadowLvr400
09-26-05, 06:19 PM
Start with a 75 shot though, Over time, running my 125 shot lifted my heads, blew my headgaskets. I rebuilt, and opened the heads up more, which rellay let the nitrous play, but I had a major accident, so I don't know if I would have popped the heads again.

Mark Bunds
08-30-06, 03:34 PM
I'm baaaaack!

Took a little hiatus over the winter since I couldn't do anything with this project while there was snow on the ground, and, while I was at it, decided to take an engineering job and move to Las Vegas.

So, no more pesky winters; just power-robbing 118 deg. summer days! In any case, I still have the parts I collected for this project, and then some.

Now, if only the winter would hurry up and get here so I can work on this thing...:excited:

AlBundy
08-30-06, 04:42 PM
I was wondering what happened to you. Hell, alot of us have been wondering what happened to you. Welcome back.

Mark Bunds
08-30-06, 08:57 PM
Awww, shucks; I never knew y'all cared...

weister42
08-31-06, 01:26 AM
I always wonder what happened to the N* nitrous...cause I want one someday

davesdeville
09-01-06, 04:48 AM
Keep us posted.

ShadowLvr400
09-01-06, 12:35 PM
I had been curious as well. Wondering how things had gone. Figured you'd gotten it to work and were off driving from tank to tank. ;)

Mark Bunds
09-01-06, 09:01 PM
I am going to restart this thread in order to get the updated information to the top, since I cannot edit the earlier posts.

I am gathering more photos of the parts that I have gathered and intend to use, and the equipment, and I will be making and posting videos from start to finish, including the one that we can laugh at together when I blow my intake manifold to smitherines; won't that be a hoot! ( I WILL have a new intake manifold standing by, just in case.)

B.T.W. I have been told the the N* manifold will hold up to a substantial nitrous backfire, you know, like the kind that ejects your air filter out of the intake box and leaves you ECM dangling, but, I dont know...

Mark Bunds
09-14-07, 10:00 PM
My wife wrecked the car. Totaled it in houston, because she wasn't paying attention, probably yammering on the cell phone. :crying2:

The good news is she rammed a Honda Civic, so there's one less of those on the road.

The bad news is we replaced the Seville STS with a Mitsubishi Eclipse. 0-60 in 5.8, 14.4 quarter, and a six-cyl that produces nearly as much HP as the '01 N* (263 hp).

I WILL find another STS, but they are very scarce since everybody loves them.

Submariner409
09-14-07, 10:05 PM
:alchi:Take a little cleaner wax, rub the Civic stains off the front bumper, and vacuum the floor mats. Go for it.................Mitsu bishi (3 Diamonds) ? Damn thing probably gets great gas mileage and is dead quiet.

Mark Bunds
09-14-07, 11:26 PM
:alchi:Take a little cleaner wax, rub the Civic stains off the front bumper, and vacuum the floor mats. Go for it.................Mitsu bishi (3 Diamonds) ? Damn thing probably gets great gas mileage and is dead quiet.

Yeah, the Mitsu is OK on gas, but it rides like a box of rocks and I want to cry every time I see another STS!

CadillacSTS42005
09-14-07, 11:33 PM
pics of the wreck?

pietroraimondi
09-25-07, 09:09 PM
You actually have an advantage if you own an earlier OBDI system, since you have control over your ignition advance curve using aftermarket performance chips. The 10.3:1 compression of the earlier northstars merely will require you to retard your timing a few degrees to avoid knock when using above a 50 shot. And you certainly will want to run the highest octane fuel available to you. A wet nitrous system appears to be the safest and simplest since it provides its own fuel. Dry systems can be limited by the stock injectors, and the inability of the stock ECU to compensate with enough fuel at higher nitrous injection rates. I decided not to modify my stock injectors or fuel pressure, since doing so would mess up the driveability of my car when not running nitrous, especially since I have no way the change the maps in my ECU.

Does anyone know if the stock Northstar pistons are forged aluminum?

Mark; the OEM Northstar pistons are cast aluminum.

caddydaddy
09-25-07, 09:37 PM
Mark; the OEM Northstar pistons are cast aluminum.

Didn't Cadillac switch to forged pistons around 2004?

Defyiant
11-25-07, 04:02 PM
where to find nos kits at for a 1996 sts

Submariner409
11-25-07, 05:52 PM
Defyiant.....Did you read the posts, a couple of pages back, about blowing N* intake manifolds and headgaskets when using nitrous?

You should really spend a couple of weeks reading up on N* engines before you begin your need for speed.........

AJxtcman
11-25-07, 08:39 PM
where to find nos kits at for a 1996 sts

This is safer
http://www.cadillacforums.com/forums/northstar-performance-technical-discussion/123844-cryogenics.html

AJxtcman
04-21-08, 07:58 AM
:bump:

I have a good reason to bring this back up

Destroyer
04-21-08, 09:38 AM
:bump:

I have a good reason to bring this back upTrying to beat 2300 posts of nothing but talk?:p

AJxtcman
04-21-08, 11:35 AM
Trying to beat 2300 posts of nothing but talk?:p

Lots more than talking.

You have been missing all the fun. I have several cars running around with tunes in them. They are all happy:D
One guy needs to get his back to me to fix a goofy shift, but other than that they are running strong

BTW I am installing a Nitrous kit for the __________ ___________ ________

Destroyer
04-21-08, 04:26 PM
Lots more than talking.

You have been missing all the fun. I have several cars running around with tunes in them. They are all happy:D
One guy needs to get his back to me to fix a goofy shift, but other than that they are running strong

BTW I am installing a Nitrous kit for the __________ ___________ ________
I've seen an Eldorado w/N* run at the track a few years ago. Dont know how big the shot was, all I remember is that the car ran mid 8's in the 1/8 mile and I thought it was abnormally quick so I asked the guy what he had done. I liked N* cars back then. :eek: