: dirty hands clean



Adumb
08-04-05, 10:21 PM
all i have at my house to clean my hands is dish soap and that doesnt get them too clean after working on the engine, so i decided to try something new today. maybe other ppl do this, but i have never heard of it, i used the dish soap and shook some salt onto my hands as well. it worked very well to get the grease off.

terrible one
08-04-05, 11:44 PM
Yep. When I'm out of Fast Orange (cleaner w/ pumice in it) I just put get some dirt and dish soap and go at it. Very effective.

Colt D
09-23-05, 10:35 PM
Baking powder is the ticket for that. Use the box from the freezer that's supposed to absorb odors rather than the one from the pantry thats for making cookies. The black fingerprints upset the cooks in the house.

Snyiper
09-30-05, 08:34 AM
Dawn dishwashing liquid works well also and sugar is a good abrasive
Glenn

Stoneage_Caddy
10-01-05, 08:56 PM
pre soap your hands before working on the car , dont rinse them , just coat them in dawn and get to work ...

rags always help too , papertowels dont cut it , typicaly if i dont use my gloves (lets face it gloves cant be used all the time) , ill pre soap my hands , then wash them when done and use a rag to clean futher , then resoap rince and use papertowels

get the water as hot as you can stand too , thatll expand the skin, open pores, and all that crap ....

oh and engine oil makes a good soap too , ever notice how easy your hands come clean after and oil change ? supposedly used oil is a carcinogen so i cant recmoned it ....but ...you know ....

davesdeville
10-03-05, 07:00 AM
My trick is to do all my work at my friend's garage. He's got some lava liquid soap that works, and it's free to me.

powerglide
10-17-05, 07:27 PM
I wear disposable rubber gloves like the ones they use at proctologists!

mcowden
10-18-05, 12:29 PM
I wear disposable rubber gloves like the ones they use at proctologists!

LOL... I guess if there's any one person that really wants to keep their hands clean, that would be the one. If it works for Dr. Ben Dover, it works for me!

powerglide
10-18-05, 12:48 PM
........ Ben Dover.........

With a name like that, he's got to be a porn star!

70eldo
08-31-06, 02:40 AM
I use brake cleaner. You know, the spray can to clean your brakes. It dries out your skin, so you still have to clean it off with water and soap, but it is well effective and fast.

danbuc
08-31-06, 08:05 PM
I wear disposable rubber gloves like the ones they use at proctologists!



Nothing better to cover your hands while wrenching on a car than textured Latex I always say:thumbsup: I go through almost two boxes of gloves a week at work sometimes if I've got alot of really messy jobs, especially ones that involve stuff like tranny fluid and what not. We also use ass loads of brake clean which can really dry your skin out bad.....hence the wearing of the gloves.

Oldfatslob
09-05-06, 07:42 PM
I have used clothes washing powders, get the thick crud off, but recently, I've found that the degreaser stuff you can clean engines and tires work really good.
:alchi:

STS-in-Nottingham
09-06-06, 04:49 AM
Dawn dishwashing liquid works well also and sugar is a good abrasive
Glenn


Yup!..sugar and dish soap have been used since the year dot

Mark.

Boombotz
09-06-06, 07:56 AM
I have always used laundry detergent to get my hands clean.

jimfulco
10-25-06, 09:42 PM
My skin won't tolerate GoJo, Fast Orange, dish soap, etc. I spray my hands with WD-40, rub it around real well, then wipe off with a relatively clean terry cloth towel. That gets them clean enough to go in the house, and plain old bar soap gets the rest, using a cheap toothbrush for the fingernail areas.

Those with skin irritated by chemicals should look into Acid Mantle Cream. It returns normal acidity to your skin and helps heal skin irritated by the crap we gearheads are sometimes prone to wallowing in. Your pharmacist can order it. It's made by Doak Dermatological division of Bradley Pharmaceuticals.

eldorado99
10-25-06, 09:56 PM
Y'all should try this stuff: http://www.worxtm.com/products/hand_cleaner/index.htm

The one I use is a different brand, but its all the same, just a green powder you rub on with a bit of water. Best hand cleaner I've ever used, even better than fast orange. And it's non toxic so if you're really really hungry... well never mind. ;)

nigelb
10-26-06, 05:43 AM
i use a generic barrier cream. i've found that it kinda works as a soap as well but only if i used it before working.
i aslo use latex gloves, but they often split at the most dirtiest part of the repair.
i use just about any household cleaner i can find,
washing up liquid mixed with clothes detergent
washing up liquid and dishwasher tablets or powder
washing up liquid and sugar
surface cream cleaner
surface powder cleaner

good job i buy these things at costco

ewill3rd
10-26-06, 05:56 AM
It scares me to read some of this stuff!
There are lots of options, go to a hardware store and buy a box of latex gloves. I like the "powder free" gloves because often times the powdered ones irritate my skin, and drive me nuts when I take them off and my hands are covered with sweaty powder. You can also use the brown "jersey" gloves.
Please don't use chemicals to clean your skin, brake clean, solvent, gasoline, WD-40, and transmission fluid have solvent type properties, but they can contaminate your blood with stuff that you just don't want in there. Some of that is readily absorbed through your skin. Granted if you don't do it all the time you might be okay from a technical standpoint, but it's really a bad idea.

Over the last dozen or so years I have been wrenching every day, I have found that using a readily available hand cleaner of almost any type works very well in concert with proper hand protection. To look at my hands you'd think I was a surgeon, not a mechanic. I take good care of them, which doesn't include bathing them in chemicals.
Not to mention the gloves help provide an extra layer of protection while you are working, I have had it "save my skin" quite literally many times. That sharp object or pointy thing that would slice your hand open will attack the glove instead of exposing your veins and draining your blood, not all the time mind you, but it's really saved me in the past.

I hope this info helps someone.
Thanks for listening.

PS: Read the list of ingredients and the warnings on the cans of what you are spraying on your skin, then look on the internet for MSDS sheets or information on those chemicals from OHSA or a similar organization.

dp102288
10-26-06, 09:35 AM
Yeah I have to say a no-no on the chemicals to clean up. I would rather wash 3x with soap. Plus I usually have cuts on my hands, so I owuldn't want to get sick.

nigelb
10-26-06, 10:46 AM
when i left school i worked in construction, back then there was no health and safety notices as such on bags of cement and plaster.
the result is some pretty tough skin, my wife gets burns from bleaching the sink, i don't.
i suppose it takes different strokes for different folks.
like i posted, i use barrier cream and gloves for all but the simplest jobs, i think that's the best advice for anyone, cleaning your hands is so much easier if they're not too dirty to start with.

dkozloski
10-26-06, 04:18 PM
I've been using 5W motor oil and sugar for over 50 years followed by Boraxo hand cleaner with lanolin. If your skin cracks at the nuckles and the quick of your fingernails glue them back together with super glue. If you cut yourself the super glue trick will make it just like it never happened.

Murphyg
10-26-06, 07:51 PM
Like nigelb said barrier cream is the best.
But as all that have and use it know......
Is best to put it on before your elbow deep in your project.
Never seem to remember. It always seems to work that way Doh !!

By far the best barrier cream Ive found is a product called PR88.
Has worked wonders for friends with unbelivably sensitive skin.

Provides an unbelievable barrier to any substances that are not water based.
Solvents, paint, grease, etc... rinses right off with water.
No left over residue whatsoever.
Just clean soft skin.

jimfulco
10-26-06, 10:24 PM
Excessive soap use can irritate your skin in two ways. It removes natural oil from your skin, and it neutralizes its natural acidity. The less soap you have to use, the better.

For those who don't want to use WD-40 or harsh chemicals to loosen the grease & grime, most any kind of cheap cooking oil or mineral oil will also work, but you'll likely leave an oily film on the doorknob when you go in the house.

I've used el cheapo Wally World olive oil because it didn't taste very good and I'm too cheap to throw it away, and when I was a kid, Dad used Crisco when we got too greasy to go inside.

If you can't find Invisible Glove or Glove Kote where you live, Kerodex-51 is a fairly good barrier cream for oily work, and Kerodex-71 is for wet work. Go to http://www.prestigebrandsinc.com/kerodex.htm for more info. Again, your pharmacist can get them.

From what I've heard, nitrile gloves hold up to chemicals better than latex, and are less irritating. Harbor Freight sells them cheap.

ewill3rd
10-27-06, 07:49 AM
I'd agree the type of hand protection you use should be based on what you are working with.
Latex won't hold up when exposed to gasoline or transmission fluid. It doesn't hold up too well against straight motor oil either.
Nitrile holds up better in those instances.
I go through the latex ones pretty fast, the nitrile ones are really good but I change my gloves too often and I hate throwing away the nitrile gloves because they last for so much longer. The only thing that sucks either way is in the summer, you end up soaking your hands in sweat and when you lift them up over your head it comes running down your arms!

gary88
10-29-06, 12:47 PM
I use Gojo or Fast Orange, they both work really great. When things get really dirty, I add powdered soap.

dkozloski
10-31-06, 02:51 PM
I'd agree the type of hand protection you use should be based on what you are working with.
Latex won't hold up when exposed to gasoline or transmission fluid. It doesn't hold up too well against straight motor oil either.
Nitrile holds up better in those instances.
I go through the latex ones pretty fast, the nitrile ones are really good but I change my gloves too often and I hate throwing away the nitrile gloves because they last for so much longer. The only thing that sucks either way is in the summer, you end up soaking your hands in sweat and when you lift them up over your head it comes running down your arms!
You haven't lived until you've worked under a car in sub-zero weather and had -50F antifreeze run down into your armpit. What's neater than that is when gasoline is the liquid and you don't want to get too close to the stove when you go inside to warm up. -50F synthetic gear oil in your ear gets your attention too.

powerglide
10-31-06, 05:12 PM
You haven't lived until you've ......had -50F antifreeze run down into your armpit. ..... -50F synthetic gear oil in your ear gets your attention too.

Kinky!

:hide:

ewill3rd
11-01-06, 05:51 AM
I have bathed in some vehicle fluids in cold weather, but not approaching -50.
I hate working in the cold and snow sometimes.
I love the snow but the cold makes your hands hurt 20 times worse when you bang them on something.
Since I gave up side jobs, I don't have so many problems because I have a nice shop to work in.

xxpinballxx
11-07-06, 11:25 AM
anyone use DL hand cleaner?
That stuff works real good then all you have to do is wash after with regular soap and get the oily feel off of your hands plus there is a smell most would want washed off too.

stevebuick23
11-07-06, 09:37 PM
At my shop I have Orange Cleen. Works great.

cmobile
03-11-10, 12:15 AM
At the shop, we use a Scotch Brite scouring pad and plain old soap. The green scouring pad like the ones used in the kitchen for dishes. They are not to hard on the hands and work better than GoJo or any other chemical I have tried. Plus it removes calluses and the wife likes that.http://www.cadillacforums.com/forums/images/smilies/yup.gif

~C