: Surprise Purchase of MG Rover by China's Nanjing Automotive



Ralph
07-25-05, 09:47 PM
And so it begins........

I thought they would start buying everything they could, especially the "smaller" auto manufacturers, and get bigger and bigger, etc. (I hate being right all the time :D )

Scary indeed, or is it?

"While MG-Rover's days as a self-sustained carmaker are now over, the news that a new official owner has been selected means that the brand can continue to produce, and potentially develop vehicles. It has been long thought that the buyer of MG-Rover would help the brand return to its roots, as well as North America. There is an increasing demand for small, economical sporty cars, much like the original MGB and Triumph Spitfire and TR-series roadsters, and if Nanjing pitches a proper marketing plan it could spell the return of MG-Rover and the authentic, affordable British roadster to North America."

http://macleans.auto123.com/en/info/news/news,view.spy?artid=44842&pg=1

majax
07-29-05, 12:27 AM
I will now never own one. I am boycotting China. They are the next Soviet union and I can just see them invading the middle east one of these days for oil. It will be horrible. Where will we be?...We should hold on to our industry.

majax
07-29-05, 12:34 AM
I kind of missed the other rant on China thread so...

Ralph
07-29-05, 12:40 AM
They are the next Soviet union and I can just see them invading the middle east one of these days for oil. It will be horrible. Where will we be?...We should hold on to our industry.

More likely the Chinese will retake parts of oil-rich Siberia. For a long time, centuries ago, that was part of the Chinese empire. The people who live there aren't, of course, Russian. And also, China and Russia briefly went to war over it in 1969-70.

majax
07-29-05, 12:54 AM
Well that could come first. But I think they are gonna go east one of these days.

mccombie_5
07-29-05, 02:45 AM
I am disappointed, but also semi-pleased for Rover. They were the last big British owned indipendant, as everything else is owned abroad. I will never buy a Rover again. It will lose its character and appeal. Despite owning some (namely sportier models) they tend to be grandad's cars that smell of boiled sweets and pipe tobacco. I dont think the new wave will be this, but that stigma will still be attatched to owning a Rover.

It will be interesting to see how this progresses.

Ralph
07-29-05, 04:35 AM
I am disappointed, but also semi-pleased for Rover. They were the last big British owned indipendant, as everything else is owned abroad. I will never buy a Rover again. It will lose its character and appeal. Despite owning some (namely sportier models) they tend to be grandad's cars that smell of boiled sweets and pipe tobacco. I dont think the new wave will be this, but that stigma will still be attatched to owning a Rover.

It will be interesting to see how this progresses.

I don't think SAIC is planning to build anymore Rovers. Instead they will engineer sportscars under the MG brand, and some will be built in the UK (but most in China). It is possible that the Chinese will have the British do some of the design work, but probably not.

SAIC have also mentioned that they'd like to license for use of some of British Leyland's old brands to reintroduce and add to their portfolio. Austin, Riley, or maybe even Austin-Healey. Of course, BMW actually owns all these names now, so just as with MG, SAIC would be paying them for the rights.

mccombie_5
07-29-05, 04:44 AM
I don't think SAIC is planning to build anymore Rovers. Instead they will engineer sportscars under the MG brand, and some will be built in the UK (but most in China). It is possible that the Chinese will have the British do some of the design work, but probably not.

SAIC have also mentioned that they'd like to license for use of some of British Leyland's old brands to reintroduce and add to their portfolio. Austin, Riley, or maybe even Austin-Healey. Of course, BMW actually owns all these names now, so just as with MG, SAIC would be paying them for the rights.

There have been plans released for new Rovers, but they may not have been from this company. The Rover and MG nameplates also still belong to BMW if i remember rightly, and they were on free loan to the Phoenix Consortium, so i should imagine that they are continuing this free loan. I dont think there is alot of hope for this company any longer. The most valuable part of it was the nameplate, and that isnt even owned by them. I hope they do well But i doubt it very much. I have owed Rovers when the company was still British Leyland, and some of them were the best cars ive ever owned (the SD1) and I had a Sterling in 1988. my wife had a 214i in 1993. She gave it to her sister a year later. it is still running. They were strong cars.
I dont know, if an MG is released i will be pleased but i wouldnt buy one.... as far as i am concerned Rover died when the last owners got greedy. i did run a Rover 75 for about six months, and it was good, but only because it was designed by BMW. I wouldnt look into these cars too much. Best of luck to Rover and its new owners..

Ralph
07-29-05, 04:52 AM
We shouldn't discount SAIC. They seem determined, like the rest of the Chinese corporate community. If they invest the money, MG could help them become a powerhouse, and preserve at least some jobs and heritage in Britain. SAIC already owns most of the Korean SUV company Ssangyong.

Ralph
07-29-05, 06:15 AM
"China-Built Cars Coming to 2006 Detroit Auto Show"

Here they come!!!

"The first cars built in China to appear at any U.S. auto show have been promised for Detroit's 2006 North American International Auto Show (NAIAS) next January. Detroit Auto Dealers Assn. president, Bob Thibodeau, Jr., made the announcement Thursday at the J.D. Power International Automotive Roundtable, held in Dearborn, Mich. No disclosure of the producers of the "China cars" was made by Thibodeau, a Ford dealer in Centerline, Mich. Roundtable attendees familiar with the Chinese industry said that GM partner Shanghai Automotive and Chery Automobile Company are likely candidates.

"Cars from China are fitting for the NAIAS," Thibodeau said, "because Detroit, since 1989, has been the only international show held in the U.S." The Detroit show, which was first staged in an 11,000-square-foot arena in 1907, now attracts about 800,000 visitors each year for a one-million-square-foot spread in the Cobo Convention Center. "With China an auto-building and exporting nation that's growing by leaps and bounds," Thibodeau said, "we are exploring ways to increase the capacity for displays. The show has always been sponsored by the 250 Detroit-area franchised dealers and is important in its January timeframe as a market stimulator after the holidays."

Latest surveys show that 30 percent of show attendees buy a vehicle within one to years of each show. Thibodeau said the manufacturers spend about $300 million for show displays and staffing, and the 2006 event should equal 2005 in bringing in metro Detroit some $580 million in economic benefits. - Mac Gordon "

http://www.thecarconnection.com/Industry/Daily_Edition/Daily_Edition_Jul_29_2005.S173.A8990.html

mccombie_5
07-29-05, 10:26 AM
I wish them the best of luck, and i hope it returns some jobs to britain. But otherwise it is my personal preference not to buy another rover, for the money i would rather buy that Citroen C6 or something otherwise... :sneaky: