: 7 year rule for tires?



diver110
04-23-05, 10:59 AM
I heard that if you don't drive a car much and so there is still ample tread on the tires, that you should still replace them every 7 years. True or old wives tale?

wildwhl
04-23-05, 11:37 AM
I think it is an old wives tale - in such that you're supposed to trade in your wife after seven years if you don't drive her much :histeric:

don_mccarter
04-23-05, 11:44 AM
I heard that if you don't drive a car much and so there is still ample tread on the tires, that you should still replace them every 7 years. True or old wives tale?
I had a car that was older with low miles and older tires.
The local Goodyear dealer did a visual inspection for me from time to time.
If you start seeing signs of aging it is time to replace them. Tires not
wives.

Dave's V
04-23-05, 12:48 PM
They recommend replacing them at 7 years because the rubber wears out over time.

Fortunately, for the CTS V owner that will not be a problem.

BBV
04-23-05, 01:50 PM
CLIP.......

.......Fortunately, for the CTS V owner that will not be a problem.
Or unfortunately.
3900 miles on my V and all 4 are well over half gone.

Xrayqueen
04-23-05, 02:24 PM
I have a little Mazda MX3.That is garage kept. From experience if your car is not driven your tires will get tire dry rot. So please drive it sometime or you will be replacing tires that are brand new so to speak :(
Peace :)

BeagleBrains
04-23-05, 07:18 PM
I average less than 7,000 miles per year. Aging breaks down the tire structure and air starts showing through in the form of slow leaks, even with 75% of the tread remaining. Also, high speed sprints are less favorable with a degraded tire. I buy new tires at six years of use, regardless of mileage.
You can see obvious cracking throughout the tire and sidewall with aging.
I always change out belts and hoses at 5 years. Distributor cap and plug wires every two years. This fares better than having a leak or broken alternator belt stranding me on the road.