: How warm do I warm my car up?



weister42
03-09-05, 05:04 PM
I warm my car up until the dash guage says 75 degrees, is that warm enough?

mcowden
03-09-05, 05:53 PM
You don't have to warm it up at all. It has sensors and a computer that accommodate the engine running at a very wide range of temperatures. Unless you're living in Fairbanks, Alaska (sorry, dkozloski) don't warm it up at all. It will warm up faster when you drive it anyway. Warming it up just wastes gas and doesn't really help anything. Start it up and drive unless it's way below zero.

peteski
03-09-05, 05:54 PM
THere is no need (or a specific procedure) to warm up the engine. Just start it and drive it. But use commen sense - don't abuse it and floor it when it is still cold. Warming it up just wastes fuel.

When it is really cold (around 0F for me) I let it idle 'til it is about 20F and then I gently drive it.

Other than that, I don't really find a need to warm it up. Sometimes when I get out of work and the car is covered in snow, I'll let it idle as I'm cleaning it off. By the time I'm done, it is around 80 or 90F.

If you were to search the older messages here you'll find that our resident expert (Bbob) says the same thing.

But if you live in Alaska - that might be a different story... :D

Peteski

dkozloski
03-09-05, 06:06 PM
I have an unheated garage here in Fairbanks that still keeps the car warmer than outside in the open. That being said, I have the factory block heater that is connected through a timer. As my wife is getting ready to leave for work in the morning she will remotely open the garage door and start the car. In the few minutes it takes her to gather up her stuff the car idles. She goes out, gets in the car, and drives off to work. By this time the analog temperature gauge is just coming off the pin. Her only concern is that there is no way to remotely turn on the heated seats.

BeelzeBob
03-09-05, 07:47 PM
I have an unheated garage here in Fairbanks that still keeps the car warmer than outside in the open. That being said, I have the factory block heater that is connected through a timer. As my wife is getting ready to leave for work in the morning she will remotely open the garage door and start the car. In the few minutes it takes her to gather up her stuff the car idles. She goes out, gets in the car, and drives off to work. By this time the analog temperature gauge is just coming off the pin. Her only concern is that there is no way to remotely turn on the heated seats.


When my wife used to park outside in the winter I put one of the small in-car 120 volt heaters on the passenger floor connected to a timer. It would kick off and warm up the interior nicely just before she was leaving. Kept me out of the doghouse for a long time. Fancy her parking outside now....LOL LOL

weister42
03-10-05, 12:47 AM
Really? I always thought I have to warm up my car in the winter before I drive it, sometimes my car sputters when it's really cold and I'm trying to get going...then again I remember my 89 Taurus never needed to warm up:rolleyes:

Cars do run better when it's not cold though.

dkozloski
03-10-05, 01:10 AM
I have one of the ubiquitous "Little Buddy" heaters but there is so much machinery under the driver's seat of a CTS I gave up trying to mount it.

caddydaddy
03-10-05, 07:57 AM
I have a remote starter on my '94 Deville. I only use it when it's 30 or below. It was 10 this morning, and running it for 10 minutes makes it nice inside!

mcowden
03-10-05, 10:10 AM
Really? I always thought I have to warm up my car in the winter before I drive it, sometimes my car sputters when it's really cold and I'm trying to get going. Cars do run better when it's not cold though.

If it sputters when it's cold then something else is wrong. There are air temperature and flow sensors that essentially tell the PCM what volume of oxygen is being fed into the cylinders, and that helps make a decision about how much fuel to give it to maintain a correct air/fuel ratio. If something isn't working right in that system, it should be fixed. Are there any codes stored in the computer? There should be no sputtering. It could be a fuel pressure regulator or maybe the throttle body needs to be cleaned and the battery disconnected, but no warm up should be necessary. As peteski mentioned, you probably don't want to gun it or drive it hard until it warms up a bit, but that's more for oil circulation purposes than how it runs. I think you should start with cleaning the throttle body and disconnecting the battery for 30 seconds. Then start it and disconnect the vacuum line from the FPR and watch for leakage. Of course, with the weather warming up a bit, you may not see the problem again for a while.

BeelzeBob
03-10-05, 01:55 PM
I have one of the ubiquitous "Little Buddy" heaters but there is so much machinery under the driver's seat of a CTS I gave up trying to mount it.


I just mounted it on a flat piece of plywood so it couldn't tip over or anything , painted the plywood to match the carpet and set it on the floor in the backseat. It didn't get in the way, was hardly visible and performed excellently. It was also easy to remove in the spring rather than semi-permanently mounting it somewhere.

dkozloski
03-10-05, 03:18 PM
Thanks for the tip. The snow is melting and running off the roof today so I'll catalog it for use next year.

NewCaddyFan
03-19-05, 12:43 PM
Sounds like a concept Cadillac should incorp. into future models. Perfect for the 9 to 5 crowd in the colder climates of the world.