: Anyone here a vegatairan



daacon
03-02-05, 01:12 AM
Hey all

Been away for a while - busy busy busy - but I have dropped by and read most of the posts ....

So my 16 old daughter wants to be a vegatairan. Me I am like Denis O'Leary song a$$h0le - eating McDonalds Quarter pounders in those non-bio-degradable containers .....I love MEAT ....

I am leaning towards letting her make that choice as long as she gets the required protien. Refusal to a teenager is just an excuse to make them want it more.

Just curious if any one here is meat free ? Too late for me ...like I said I live in cattle country - and I love beef / pork / chicken / fish / almost all MEAT.

danbuc
03-02-05, 01:22 AM
Just out of curiosity, are you the kind of person who walks around in the summer time saying "How about this heat?"...sorry, I couldnt resist.

I am not a vegetarian, and all I have to say is this, "Bacon's good. Pork Chop's are good. The again, sewer rat may taste like pumpkin pie, but that doesn't mean I'd eat the filthy motha f**ker!" :histeric: .

Ralph
03-02-05, 01:24 AM
I'm a meat eater too and people need a certain amount of protein. Protein is essential for growth and development! It provides the body with energy and is needed for the making of hormones, antibodies, enzymes anf tissues. It's needed to build muscle, and amino acids come from essential proteins.

OK, foods she can get protein from without eating meat are eggs and milk, brown rice, corn, nuts (almonds are loaded), wheat. (to make a complete protein, combine any of these with beans)

Or combine brown rice with, beans, nuts, seeds, wheat.

Yogurt is the only animal-derrived complete-proteinsource recommended in the diet. She needs to get enough lacto acidophillilus (good intestional bacteria) to ensure proper digestion and she can get it from yogurt or buying the supplents at Sangsters, etc. (fairly cheap at sangsters at around 12 bucks)

Personally, I recommend some meat (or fish) because when you are young and developing it is very important IMO.

May I ask why she wants to be a vegatairian? I'm not telling anyone what to do, just my opinion. :hide:

BeelzeBob
03-02-05, 01:39 AM
I was a vegetarian for a year and I really felt great during that time. I needed very little sleep, supposably because I wasn't eating meat and didn't need to digest it - which left me with more energy..

Anyway.. Just have her take a protein suppliment - and, even more importantly, an iron suppliment. Most of our iron comes from beef.. A multi-vitamin with minerals is also important - for everyone...

daacon
03-02-05, 08:40 AM
Just out of curiosity, are you the kind of person who walks around in the summer time saying "How about this heat?"...sorry, I couldnt resist. .

:histeric: yes I love that feeling I get in the 'sub-cockle' area - I am just an average white suburbanite slob .....I like to drive really slow in the ultra fast lane and sometimes I park in handicap spaces while handicap people make handicap faces ............ what a song :histeric: and sorry it was Denis Leary , O'Leary not sure where that came from :banghead:

daacon
03-02-05, 08:55 AM
May I ask why she wants to be a vegatairian? I'm not telling anyone what to do, just my opinion. :hide:

Why because she is an opininated teenage Girl :D - Telling her NO outright becuase ....(well I have no 'real' reason for this one) She is a good (no great )Kid, althletic and does well in school , she has a couple of friends who are Vegatairians and we have a niece who is as well. I am ok with it as we will make sure she gets enough of what is required. The offical reason when I asked was because you do not have to kill anything to live which I agreed. But my inside voice (was hard to resist - part of the parent thing) was while we were driving - do you know how many cows gave up thier lives for these nice seats you are stiing in ......

We will support this 'phase' and it may well be a phase or may not be - to me I considered it an alternative lifestyle - but a heathly one if done properly - we will also ensure she has suppliments and gets enough of what her body needs.

She use to love meat (weak spot for the smell of Bacon on weekend mornings sometimes) - and some fish (Lobster). Besides you can always have what you want. If we happen to go out for some Lobster and she has some it is not like the "Veggy Police" will suddenly appear and arrest her . Some Vegitarians have bits of meat at times...anyway I digress

We made sure she knows her choices will not affect what we eat (again pretty much any animal that can be killed and slapped on the BBQ :worship: )

Who knows - I may eat a little more healthy as a result .......

daacon
03-02-05, 08:59 AM
I was a vegetarian for a year and I really felt great during that time. I needed very little sleep, supposably because I wasn't eating meat and didn't need to digest it - which left me with more energy..

Anyway.. Just have her take a protein suppliment - and, even more importantly, an iron suppliment. Most of our iron comes from beef.. A multi-vitamin with minerals is also important - for everyone...

Cool - what made you go back to meat ?

The 'suppliments' will be tricker - she is not a great, no make that she is a terrible pill swallower). We have Whey Powder and make home made fruit protein shakes which she likes - so no worries there. We need to find some non pill form of multi-vitamin ......

patgizz
03-02-05, 09:16 AM
i would be but i can't give up grilled chicken breasts or salmon fillets. other than that, no meat or meat product for me. no dairy, no hamburgers. i try my best to only eat certified organic foods. i'm allergic to the antibiotics used in non-organic meat and such. if i really want a pizza i dont put cheese on it, and if i really feel like something with milk(ie - a bowl of rice krispies once a month), i use soy milk. it tastes alot better then it used to.

CoupeDevilleRob
03-02-05, 11:14 AM
Mmmmm, meat, (insert Homer Simpson drooling sound). I couldn't live in a world without bacon.

BUILDINGCTSAMG
03-02-05, 11:14 AM
Sal i find it beyond funny that you type out supposably....Ever watch Friends?

El Dobro
03-02-05, 11:47 AM
I belong to PETA (People Eating Tasty Animals)

RBraczyk
03-02-05, 11:53 AM
^ I'm with stupid

Rolex
03-02-05, 12:39 PM
I am not a vegetarian, and all I have to say is this, "Bacon's good. Pork Chop's are good. The again, sewer rat may taste like pumpkin pie, but that doesn't mean I'd eat the filthy motha f**ker!" :histeric: .

That's a classic line! I also like: "Go into your bag and take out my wallet." 'How do I know which one is your wallet?' "It's the one that says bad muther F****r." You know you're screwed when you've stolen a wallet that has BMF on it.

Oh yeah....I would say I'm a meatandtateratarian. :p

Kev
03-02-05, 01:12 PM
Where's the beef?! :cowboy:

El Dobro
03-02-05, 01:16 PM
^ I'm with stupid
So tell me, did your parents ever have any children?

1toycad
03-02-05, 01:31 PM
Hey all

Been away for a while - busy busy busy - but I have dropped by and read most of the posts ....

So my 16 old daughter wants to be a vegatairan. Me I am like Denis O'Leary song a$$h0le - eating McDonalds Quarter pounders in those non-bio-degradable containers .....I love MEAT ....

I am leaning towards letting her make that choice as long as she gets the required protien. Refusal to a teenager is just an excuse to make them want it more.

Just curious if any one here is meat free ? Too late for me ...like I said I live in cattle country - and I love beef / pork / chicken / fish / almost all MEAT.

One of my daughters has been a strict vegetarian for 3 years. In High School she was captain of the cross-country team and a fast runner.

She is very lean, but also very strong. Never gets sick and can run mile after mile on hilly terrain like it is no one's business.

When we go to the gym, she can get on the StairMaster and keep at it for a long time. I usually give up after a short while.

Being a vegetarian does not seem to have impacted her negatively.

Being a vegetarian is tough though. Unless your duaghter is really committed, she will give it up in a short time.

I say, let her try it and see what happens.

RobertCTS
03-02-05, 02:10 PM
Hey all

Been away for a while - busy busy busy - but I have dropped by and read most of the posts ....

So my 16 old daughter wants to be a vegatairan. Me I am like Denis O'Leary song a$$h0le - eating McDonalds Quarter pounders in those non-bio-degradable containers .....I love MEAT ....

I am leaning towards letting her make that choice as long as she gets the required protien. Refusal to a teenager is just an excuse to make them want it more.

Just curious if any one here is meat free ? Too late for me ...like I said I live in cattle country - and I love beef / pork / chicken / fish / almost all MEAT.

Have your Hamburger and eat it too. Here's a site of delicious FAKE MEAT PRODUCTS:)

http://www.kelloggs.com/brand/msfarms/home.html

90Brougham350
03-02-05, 03:48 PM
One of our fellow members, 1toycad, posted this a while back on a thread about MB and leather seats, I saved it just for shits and giggles like I do anything I find interesting or of future value. Thanks 1toycad! Enjoy!

Brian




By H. Leon Abrams, Jr.
Associate Professor Emeritus of Anthropology E.G.C.,
University System of Georgia

One of the arguments proffered by vegetar- ians is that our primate ancestors were vegetarians and, to be healthy, we should eat the same kind of diet.

An article entitled “The Western Lowland Gorilla Diet Has Implications For the Health of Humans and Other Hominids,” which appeared in a recent issue of Human and Clinical Nutrition, makes this argument. With reference to the authors’ study of the vegetarian diet of gorillas, the research is sound, but to claim that humans would be better off with a vegetarian diet like that of the gorillas is spurious and equivocal.

One misconception about the gorilla diet is that it contains no animal products. On the contrary, all of the great ape groups take in some animal protein, whether overtly or inadvertently, by consuming insects, insect eggs and the larvae that nest on the plants and fruits they eat. In her pioneering work on chimpanzees, Jane Goodall discovered to her amazement, and to the amazement of the rest of the world, that chimpanzees kill and eat monkeys and make a tool to extract termites from their hills (homes), and that they went to considerable effort to obtain these foods. It is also significant that meat is the only food they share with other chimpanzees.

All monkeys, lemurs and apes are classified as vegetarians and/or fruitivors, but they consume a small amount of animal protein by unconsciously eating the small insects, their eggs and larvae on the plant foods they select to eat. The National Zoo in Washington, D.C. tried to breed the near extinct fruitivorian South American golden marmoset in captivity with no result, but when a little animal protein was added to their diet, they began to breed, which proves that they require a small amount of animal protein to be healthy and reproduce.

With the exception of humans, the native habitat of all the primates is in the tropics. By contrast, for thousands of years, humans have inhabited all the land masses of the world, except for Anarctica. The first humans, the Australopithicines, circa 2 million years ago, were omnivorous. Recently, some researchers, in examining their fossil teeth, have claimed that the Australopithicines were vegetarians; but the evidence indicates they were omnivorous. It is clear that by the time “humans” evolved, from Homo erectus through to what is now considered “modern” humans, such as Cro-Magnon man, humans were primarily meat eaters. According to J. Brownoski, (The Ascent of Man), it was meat-eating that led to the rise of modern man. Homo erectus invented stone tools for hunting big game which led to the invention of more advanced stone tools by Cro-Magnon to modern humans.

It was the quest for meat that led Homo sapiens to colonize the world. They followed the herds of animals. When overpopulation caused the animal food supply to dwindle, many moved on, from tropical Africa to North Africa, Asia, Europe, the Americas and Australia. They walked and adapted to the cold climates and were able to do so because meat is compact energy, and one kill of a mammoth or other big game could feed many people and lasted for a long period of time; whereas gathering plants and fruits to eat was seasonal. Until the early part of the 20th century there were peoples who lived almost entirely on animal food. For example, the Eskimos of North America and Lapps of Scandinavia lived almost entirely on animal protein and were very healthy.

However, when we refer to meat, remember that meat entails fats which are necessary for sound health. The protein and minerals in the meat cannot be utilized without the nutrients in the fat. Both Steffanson and Brody, who spent time with the Eskimos and Indians of North America, reported that these people saved the fat from game animals and always ate their meat with fat.

The Eskimos ate raw meat, which is very healthy, but there is a caveat for modern society: fresh meat often contains bacteria and parasites that can cause illness, and even death, therefore it is recommended by the government that all meat should be cooked well enough to kill all such pollutants.

Humans only turned to plant foods as major food sources when, due to the ever-increasing human population, herds of animals became scarce. They learned to domesticate some animals and invented agriculture.

Humans learned to use fire, to any extent, in the Paleolithic age. Cooking certainly was necessary, because grains cannot be eaten raw. It is also interesting to note that when humans began eating a diet high in grains, the incidence of tooth decay increased considerably. Tooth decay increased dramatically when refined grains (wheat and rice) became staple diets for a large percentage of the world’s population.

For normal growth and sound health throughout life, the human species requires eight amino acids which their bodies cannot manufacture, vitamin B12 and some essential minerals. The only viable source of these amino acids and of vitamin B12 is animal protein such as red meat, fish, shell fish, eggs, milk, insects and worms. The lack of these amino acids results in serious illnesses. For example, kwashiorkor is a deficiency disease which impedes the normal development of vital brain cells and stunts growth. People may be getting all they need to eat to satisfy their hunger from grains and other plant foods. They may even become plump on a diet of grains, but their normal growth and development is stunted. For instance, some Maya Indian peasant groups of Guatemala primarily have only corn, beans and squash to eat. They like meat, but are too poor to purchase meats or raise animals. Feeding domesticated animals would sacrifice land needed to grow the grains on which they subsist. This condition is common over much of the world.

Unlike humans, the digestive tract of gorillas is equipped to manufacture the essential amino acids and other vital nutrients. The human digestive system is not so equipped and we must rely on animal proteins.

It is interesting to note that advocates of vegetarian diets who use the diet of apes as a rational to support their food choice—asserting that the ape diet is more “natural”—fail to advocate eating a diet of all-raw plant foods as the apes do. The basic plant foods that humans eat must be cooked. Vegan advocates also say that by combining grains with legumes, one can get the essential amino acids. Though this may be theoretically possible, in practice it is not viable and extremely difficult or impossible to accomplish, particularly if robust health is to be achieved and maintained generation after generation. Of course, due to modern technology, many of the essential nutrients can be supplied by synthetic or processed products, but these merely duplicate what is naturally in animal protein and are often extracted from them. To be on the safe side, it is wise to procure essential nutrients from their best source—animal protein.

Anthropologists have wondered why certain foods came to be prohibited by some religions. The anthropologist, Dr. Marvin Harris, in his two extremely readable, informative and enjoyable books, Cannibals and Kings and Cows, Pigs, Wars and Witches, shows that the prohibition of pigs (pork) by the Jewish religion and cows by the Hindu religion came about due to the ever-increasing pressure of population growth.

Pigs eat grain. It takes lots of land to grow grain for wheat which could feed more humans than it could feed pigs that require the grain to become meat on the human dinner-table. So wheat was in competition with pigs and the wheat won out when human referees decided wheat was more efficient in feeding the growing population. So pork wasn’t worth the grain and was prohibited by the religious leaders as a strategy to feed the population more efficiently.

Likewise, in India where beef was widely eaten at an earlier time in history, the Hindu religion prohibited it because the cow was more valuable for its milk and dung than as edible beef. Milk from the cow provided animal protein and the dung provided fuel for the fires to cook food. Religious sanctions are a very powerful societal force of control. (In these books by Harris, only a few pages are devoted to this subject, but the books are highly recommended for gaining insight into human behavior.)

In economically diverse societies where animal protein is scarce among the poorer classes and more abundant in the increasingly affluent sectors of society, it is interesting to note the differences in body height that seems to reflect the way people are forced to eat. The less affluent sectors subsist primarily on grains and a few vegetables and lack the height that is found among the more affluent ruling classes. This situation can develop as a result of overpopulation because too many humans inhabiting in a region can deplete the carrying capacity of the land upon which the food is produced.

The ancient Maya of the Classical Period used the slash and burn strategy to create more arable land as their population outgrew the surrounding forest. In order to create fields in which to grow corn, squash, beans and chili peppers, forest land was cleared by the destructive method of cutting down trees and burning the debris. This is a very brutal strategy within a fragile ecosystem that rapidly exhausts the soil. The Mayan diet consisted chiefly of the vegetables they grew, a few fruits and game. But the game became scarce as the forest was cleared for farm land and only the tiny ruling class had access to animal protein. (They had the domestic turkey and dog, but these animals ate the same food as humans.) This ecologically unstable situation led to the collapse of the Classical Maya civilization when they abandoned their great cities. The point for this article is that the skeletons unearthed from the Mayan burial grounds reveal that the ruling class was taller than the masses. The nobility supplemented their basic diet of corn, beans and squash with what animal protein was available; whereas the masses had practically none.

So what can the diet of gorillas tell us about what constitutes a healthy diet for humans? Little if anything. Humans are omnivores and need animal protein as well as plant foods to maintain sound health. The author of this article and Dr. Melvin E. Page recommend, as presented in their book, Your Body is Your Best Doctor, the following as a sound diet to help maintain optimal health: Eat a variety of fresh animal protein and fats, a wide variety of fresh vegetables, fruits and nuts and whole grain breads and cereals.

For a complete bibliography on this subject, see “The Relevance of Paleolithic Diet in Determining Contemporary Nutritional Needs,” H. Leon Abrams, Jr. The Journal of Applied Nutrition. Vol. 31, Numbers 1 and 2.

1toycad
03-02-05, 04:09 PM
I recently showed that article to my vegetarian daughter. She scoffed at it.

Then we went out for a three mile run. When I finally puffed and huffed home, she was already home, waiting for me, munching on a tofu burger.

Man, it is a pain in the ass to get old and have your kids show you up!:banghead:

I guess I am going to adopt the silverbacks' diet and start eating bugs and termites, along with my veggies! :rolleyes:

davesdeville
03-02-05, 05:50 PM
I was a vegetatian for a year minus about 2 days in 2001 or 2. I put on damn near 40 pounds (of muscle... mostly) when I started eating meat again, but I also started working out then so it was probably a combination of the 2. It's not hard to do and as long as your body still gets what it needs there's nothing wrong with it.

Spock
03-02-05, 07:51 PM
Certainly for someone working out protein is essential for muscle growth. As afforementioned, humans NEED to eat meat. Substitutions aren't the same but do quite a bit. No supplements or other food products can fully replace meat.

I find many vegetarians are vegetarians just to tell those who eat meat off, to feel superior that they are doing the right thing and everyone else is not. It's more image one seeks than actually being a vegetarian for health/moral reasons.

Let her choose vegetarian choices...but at home I wouldn't personally customize the menu around her. She'll break...and Alberta beef will be there for the save!

Elvis
03-03-05, 09:59 AM
Go with the flow. Let her eat what she wants as long as she EATS. You have to worry about anorexia at that age.

Also, at 16 you've already done all the child-rearing you will with her. At about 15 her sense of right and wrong is already formed. She has to find her own way now. So just encourage her and don't even consider it as a rebellion thing (which it might be).

A side benefit that you may not have considered is that she is entering the years of her life where MOST kids eat nothing but fast food and junk food. The college years are the absolute WORST. Even with a slight protein deficiency in her diet, she'll probably be better off at that extreme than she would be with a surplus of grease and fat coursing through her veins.

I'm not a vegetarian, BTW, I'm not that disciplined. But I try to keep my beef/pork consumption down to one meal a week.

Kev
03-03-05, 11:18 AM
So tell me, did your parents ever have any children?
I believe the question is;
"Did your parents have any children that lived?"
:devil:

1toycad
03-03-05, 12:26 PM
Go with the flow. Let her eat what she wants as long as she EATS. You have to worry about anorexia at that age.

Also, at 16 you've already done all the child-rearing you will with her. At about 15 her sense of right and wrong is already formed. She has to find her own way now. So just encourage her and don't even consider it as a rebellion thing (which it might be).

A side benefit that you may not have considered is that she is entering the years of her life where MOST kids eat nothing but fast food and junk food. The college years are the absolute WORST. Even with a slight protein deficiency in her diet, she'll probably be better off at that extreme than she would be with a surplus of grease and fat coursing through her veins.

I'm not a vegetarian, BTW, I'm not that disciplined. But I try to keep my beef/pork consumption down to one meal a week.

Ditto on every point. Elvis, you are right on target!!! :thumbsup:

I didn't think my duaghter was going to stick to it, but she has. She is lean, she is strong and she is a fast runner.

She does not get sick.

At 15 or 16, we are pretty done passing our values to our kids. From that point on they are making their own decisions. My daughter's decision was based first on her love of animals and second on her own research about the value of a vegetarian diet.

Everyone in a while, just to drive her crazy (and to test her commitment) I'll drive through In and Out (a So. Calif hamburger chain) and bring home a double-cheese burger. They smell oh so delcious. :sneaky:

She is good at resisting temptation. She just looks at me and takes another bite of her tofu salad then goes out for another run--in the rain. :yup:

Elvis
03-03-05, 01:27 PM
That's nice to hear. She sounds like a terrific kid. Good luck.

daacon
03-03-05, 04:46 PM
Good points by all (well most anyway hahaha) - there was never a doubt of letting her do it - was curious though good to see others have been there done that.

Yeah getting older and passing the tourch to kids ... they are already real people with real opinions and real values - but we have been blessed for far (there have been a few incidents obvioulsy - but if I compare it to my teenage years ......I am way ahead of the game).

I could not outrun my daughter at this point either. I may be faster in a 50 meter sprint (that is debatable) - but in a distance run there would be no contest - I might beat her if the Cab I hailed got to me before she finished :coolgleam

But I am still Dad - and that still counts - hope it aways does :thumbsup:

Kev
03-03-05, 04:49 PM
....But I am still Dad - and that still counts - hope it aways does :thumbsup:
My Dad used to tell my brother and I, "You may get bigger than me, but you'll never be big enough." and he was right.

Ralph
03-03-05, 04:52 PM
However, the possible dangers SHOULD be considered. There may be a lot of psychology involved in this issue. There are also LONG TERM factors and possible effects to be considered. (see links under the main article)

http://www.mercola.com/2001/dec/29/vegetarian.htm

daacon
03-03-05, 11:28 PM
However, the possible dangers SHOULD be considered. There may be a lot of psychology involved in this issue. There are also LONG TERM factors and possible effects to be considered. (see links under the main article)

http://www.mercola.com/2001/dec/29/vegetarian.htm

Thanks I know there are risks - there are risks of not eating enough vegatables , fruits , too much red meat , etc. For every article like that I could google an opposing opinion.

My wife use to counsel people on nutrition so we are well aware of what the body needs. As mentioned here there are suppliments that can help ("Vegetarians may need to make a special effort to get enough calcium, iron, zinc, vitamin D, vitamin B-6, and vitamin B-12")

She is not trying to be e Vegan so dairy products such as Yogurt will be in her diet. We have always bought Almonds in bulk as a snack food. A multi vitiam will be included. There are tell tale signs of not eating healthy and we will keep a watch on.

It may be a phase it may be a permanent lifestyle change. As long as she is healthy and has the desire I am ok with it.

As Elvis said I could not do it - even with Mad Cow :D

Ralph
03-03-05, 11:47 PM
My wife use to counsel people on nutrition so we are well aware of what the body needs.

As Elvis said I could not do it - even with Mad Cow :D

Yours too? Ya, my Fiance counseled on nutrition also. She believes that supplements are not a substitute for food though. Lloyd Robertson mentioned once that some study found supplemnents actually didn't allow the same nutrients from the actual food to be absorbed into the blood for some reason. The problem with supplements is that there is controversy over the synthesized supps and their effectiveness, etc.

Mad cow! Dang you son, lets remind our Yankee friends that the system caught it and it didn't enter the food chain!! We test more cattle than the U.S. OR Japan and have a VERY similar method of testing in Canada compared to the U.S. (which is also why we found a couple more cases than the Yanks) The more you test the more you find UNTIL it's completely flushed from the stocks. I'll be explaining that one in the CI for a month if we're not careful! ;)

Kev
03-03-05, 11:54 PM
I like them big mega vitamine packs, they make my pee turn funny colors! :bouncy:

Ralph
03-03-05, 11:58 PM
I like them big mega vitamine packs, they make my pee turn funny colors! :bouncy:

That's the B-Complex. :shhh:

I also take a bit of selenium every day so I don't go bald! However, you can't take more than 200 mcg's or supposedly you WILL go bald!!! I'm guilty of taking a bunch of other supplements too though.

RobertCTS
03-04-05, 11:08 AM
Yours too? Ya, my Fiance counseled on nutrition also. She believes that supplements are not a substitute for food though. Lloyd Robertson mentioned once that some study found supplemnents actually didn't allow the same nutrients from the actual food to be absorbed into the blood for some reason. The problem with supplements is that there is controversy over the synthesized supps and their effectiveness, etc.

Mad cow! Dang you son, lets remind our Yankee friends that the system caught it and it didn't enter the food chain!! We test more cattle than the U.S. OR Japan and have a VERY similar method of testing in Canada compared to the U.S. (which is also why we found a couple more cases than the Yanks) The more you test the more you find UNTIL it's completely flushed from the stocks. I'll be explaining that one in the CI for a month if we're not careful! ;)

Ralph,
Before you go out to consume your daily intake of Canadian beef be careful
of stray bullets!!
http://www.cnn.com/2005/WORLD/americas/03/03/canada.shooting.reut/index.html

daacon
03-04-05, 11:49 AM
Mad cow! Dang you son, lets remind our Yankee friends that the system caught it and it didn't enter the food chain!! We test more cattle than the U.S. OR Japan and have a VERY similar method of testing in Canada compared to the U.S. (which is also why we found a couple more cases than the Yanks) The more you test the more you find UNTIL it's completely flushed from the stocks. I'll be explaining that one in the CI for a month if we're not careful! ;)

All kididng aside I know. The 'scare' of Alberta Beef and some isolated cases of mad cow has had serious financial implications for Alberta beef farmers.
As Ralph mentioned screening is a good thing no a GREAT thing.

Isoalted cases have been found in Britian / US / Japan (possibly other countries). This is a political hot topic and makes for good press - is it an 'epidemic' not even close. It is something all cattle exporters should get together on and agree on a single course of action.

"Eating meat from animals with mad cow has been linked to a rare but fatal brain-wasting illness in people, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. So far, no cases have been traced to Canadian beef" . It has not altered my Beef Eating habbits one bit I still Love Alberta Beef - some of the tastiest beef in the world I might add

My $0.02 .......

Fleet
03-06-05, 05:10 PM
Make sure she is getting enough vitamin B-12. It is found practically only in meat and the quality of B-12 in meat is better than from other food sources.
She should be taking a B-12 supplement.