: dash warning lights



70 Convertible
07-18-13, 07:34 PM
I have not received my shop manual yet. Does anyone know how to replace the warning light bulbs for oil, temp and such on a 1970 DeVille?

77CDV
07-18-13, 08:34 PM
I believe you access them from underneath the IP. The bulbs are in sockets that pop out with a flathead screwdriver.

70 Convertible
07-18-13, 08:46 PM
What is the IP?

Hoosier Daddy
07-18-13, 08:49 PM
What is the IP?
Instrument panel.

Ranger
07-18-13, 10:04 PM
I believe you access them from underneath the IP. The bulbs are in sockets that pop out with a flathead screwdriver.
I remember when it was that easy. I also remember when it took 3 hours and I had to remove half the dash to replace one lousy bulb. :annoyed:

70 Convertible
07-18-13, 10:45 PM
Thanks for the info guys. Since I am still at work it will be a few days before I tackle the lights but at least I have a starting point.

Kingoftypos
07-18-13, 11:24 PM
I remember when it was that easy. I also remember when it took 3 hours and I had to remove half the dash to replace one lousy bulb. :annoyed:

I went from a 2004 Pontiac Grand Prix to a 2006 Cadillac CTS. The head light housing in the Grand Prix was held in by a little 2 inch wide piece of plastic. Just lift up and the entire headlight assembly comes out. Now the CTS, well the bumper has to be removed. :-/

KOT

70 Convertible
07-18-13, 11:58 PM
KOT,
That does not restore my faith about Cadillacs. The older ones were so much easier to work on (at least in my opinion) but that is true of just about all vehicles. I had a chevy cavalier when I was in my teens that had about 35 little screws with a star head holding back the dash cover. What a pain. But I was a teenager then and had no money so I had to do it myself. Ahhhh, the good old days.

CadillacLuke24
07-19-13, 01:18 AM
KOT,
That does not restore my faith about Cadillacs. The older ones were so much easier to work on (at least in my opinion) but that is true of just about all vehicles. I had a chevy cavalier when I was in my teens that had about 35 little screws with a star head holding back the dash cover. What a pain. But I was a teenager then and had no money so I had to do it myself. Ahhhh, the good old days.

That be the case with any modern automobile. The bigger PITA it be to work on, the higher the odds of the owner taking it to the dealer!

77CDV
07-19-13, 03:55 PM
The 77-92 Cadillacs are by far the easiest to work on. Everything is designed to unscrew and pull out from the front. It was one of the car's major selling points when they were introduced in 1977. Earlier and later cars, not so much. :/

orconn
07-19-13, 04:49 PM
^^^ Are you telling me, Craig, that those pre-seventy seven cars with under hood spaces so large that two mechanics could work simultaneously while the car was underway and still have room to smuggle illegal aliens were harder to work on than post 1977 cars?

Kingoftypos
07-19-13, 05:09 PM
^^^ Are you telling me, Craig, that those pre-seventy seven cars with under hood spaces so large that two mechanics could work simultaneously while the car was underway and still have room to smuggle illegal aliens were harder to work on than post 1977 cars?

Yup, because you risked your life falling into those spaces. If you fell in, you went off to some unknown galaxy. Lol

KOT

The-Dullahan
07-19-13, 05:46 PM
^^^ Are you telling me, Craig, that those pre-seventy seven cars with under hood spaces so large that two mechanics could work simultaneously while the car was underway and still have room to smuggle illegal aliens were harder to work on than post 1977 cars?

Depends on what you were working on.

From my experience (Of which I have accumulated far too much in my lifetime) cars of that vintage are so simple to work on (under the hood) to such an extent, I would purchase one over a modern car any day.

Older cars were even easier. I have seriously been thinking that because I do not own a Ford Model A, I should buy one. Cheap, efficient transport. Probably be my next car, when I have space for...another car. Fun to drive, more fun to ride in.

orconn
07-19-13, 08:17 PM
^^^ Yup, no doubt about it, the pre-electronically enhanced automobiles of the fifties, sixties (and who care about the seventies and eighties, cause they performed like poop and suffered from FWD engine compartment layouts) were much simpler and easier to work on than their electronic systemed to death contemporary progeny. I submit as proof of this fact that I, a mechanical ignoramus worked on some domestic cars and many foreign exotics with success. I refurbished my already nicely maintained Jaguar XK 150 and regularly changed the spark plugs, batteries and did other maintenance jobs on Lambos, Ferraris, Astons and even Mercedes! They must have been simple to figure out. I wouldn't do anything more than open the hood on any of these cars today!

EChas3
07-20-13, 12:12 AM
Nowadays, it's all about reducing weight, improving aero, and efficient assembly. Designers don't care about service procedures.

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I forgot style, but so many of them look the same, anyway.

Aron9000
07-20-13, 12:35 AM
Nowadays, it's all about reducing weight, improving aero, and efficient assembly. Designers don't care about service procedures.

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I forgot style, but so many of them look the same, anyway.

So true. On a friend's Acura RSX, you had to remove the power steering resevior and three brackets to change the headlight.

CadillacLuke24
07-20-13, 02:11 AM
Designers don't care about service procedures.

Yeah, especially since they have baby sized hands, not baseball mitts like some of us.

dkozloski
07-23-13, 04:14 PM
All was not sweetness and light in the "good old days".
On a Chevy Monza you had to loosen the mounts and jack up the engine to replace two spark plugs hidden by the steering gearbox.
There was no way to get the oil filter off a '54 Mercury unless you jacked up the car on one side and turned the front wheels just right.
To get the heater blower motor off a '66 Chevelle you had to pry the firewall back with a chunk of 2x4.
I'll bet there are a million more examples.