: Front end Alignment (95 FWB)



DanTheMan
02-17-05, 11:45 AM
I took my car in today to get a front end alignment due to some excessive tire wear. I was told that my idler arm was loose/damaged and would need to be replaced unless I wanted to get a new alignment every couple of weeks. They also suggested a new stearing stabalizer and wheel barrings (both of which I tend to agree with). I decided to hold of and do the work myself as that all of these things are easy enought and I'm putting in some eibach lowering springs when it gets warmer out anyways.

It seems to me though that an idler arm shouldn't be able to go bad. It is pretty much an 8 inch piece of iron. Has anyone had any experience with this sort of issue? Would replacing it fix the problem or should I focus more on how it is installed? Is there anything else that might be wrong/could go wrong that would just cause misalignment anyway?

N0DIH
02-17-05, 01:25 PM
It seems to me though that an idler arm shouldn't be able to go bad. It is pretty much an 8 inch piece of iron. Has anyone had any experience with this sort of issue? Would replacing it fix the problem or should I focus more on how it is installed? Is there anything else that might be wrong/could go wrong that would just cause misalignment anyway?

I had the drag link and idler wear out on my 76 Delta 88. They do, anything with a grease fitting will wear. And it will cause slop in the front end, so the alignment will be fine, but it will be drifty on the road. The center of the aligtment will be shifting on you.

Tom

DanTheMan
02-17-05, 03:20 PM
So to fix this I just need to replace it and make sure everything is thightened down to factory specs? Is there anything else along the way that I'll have to worry about?

Katshot
02-17-05, 03:37 PM
Lower ball-joints, tie-rod ends, and the center-link are all common wear points on this chassis, along with the idler arm.

scurling
02-17-05, 06:49 PM
Dan:

I'm sure it's too late now, but did the shop show you the excess play in the linkage? With some help in the front yard, you may be able to see it yourself by turning the wheel left and right.

The idler arm isn't just a piece of metal, it has a joint that requires grease, and will wear out over time. Installing an idler arm is no big deal for labor or parts. You could do it yourself with little experience in about an hour (max). The stablizer is questionable unless it is showing true signs of leakage. It's just another shock assembly, and again, is easily replaced in the driveway.

I would tend to trust the front end shop about the idler arm. They aren't going to make much money replacing it. It's a 15 minute job for them.