: 2008 STS - TPMS sensor problems



dustinrw
06-20-13, 02:51 AM
K had nitro put in tires two days ago. Rides much better. While driving service tmps comes on. LR tire is not working. Went back today and had them reset all of them. Worked fine then started it again. Me guys said that the tmps sensor may be bad because battery is weak in it. Said best bet was a new one from Cadillac. Cost $180??? Does anyone have ideas? Can aftermarket work? First time I've ever experienced this. Thanks

ddalder
06-20-13, 04:36 AM
A 5-6 year life span for TPMS sensors is about right. Given the age of your car, I wouldn't be surprised if it's near/at the end of its useful life. $180 sounds expensive, unless it includes installation. Even then it's a bit rich. I don't think the nitrogen had anything to do with this, I think it's likely coincidental. Some people have used aftermarket sensors but I have no experience with these. I'm pretty OE specific in my replacement parts.

Ludacrisvp
06-20-13, 08:49 AM
Parents replaced their TPMS on the 04 SRX about a month ago... about $100 each for the device, they were getting new tires on at the time so install may have been free / cheaper because of that.


GM Parts direct shows this for the STS:
[ 1 ] ELECTRICAL / ELECTRICAL / TIRE PRESSURE MONITOR COMPONENTS / TPMS sensor
tpms sensor
MSRP: $109.06
Online price: $56.71

Loren
06-20-13, 05:27 PM
http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_trksid=p2047675.m570.l1313.TR0.TRC0&_nkw=GM+20923680&_sacat=0&_from=R40

GM part # 20923680 Rock auto also has good prices. Check your valve stems to see which ones you have now, the rubber or metal stems.

dustinrw
06-20-13, 07:43 PM
I have the metal ones. Also how do know what the part number would be. I was told they run on a specific frequency and want to get the right ones. I do appreciate all of your help :-)

EChas3
06-21-13, 12:28 AM
An after market replacement was $31 from Amazon. I've had one fail in 7.5 years from my build date. Midas charged $10 to put it in and rebalance the tire on a Hunter balancer. I activated the new sensor and did the matching procedure with my own generic TPMS tool. I think it cost about $30 but it works on almost all cars.

ddalder
06-21-13, 04:12 AM
One point you should be aware of is that there are different sensors available. When I called my GM parts department, they told me two are listed for the 2008 STS. They were different prices and part numbers. I had to provide my VIN to ensure they supplied to right one. I don't know what the difference is (one may be for export vehicles although the partsman didn't indicate this). Mine ended up be the more expensive of the two. Just double check to ensure you are getting the one you require.

ezed1
06-21-13, 06:29 PM
Just another way for Gm to make some money!:mad2: Hell they should have made them so you could replace the battery:yup:

ddalder
06-21-13, 06:48 PM
Just another way for Gm to make some money!:mad2: Hell they should have made them so you could replace the battery:yup:
I disagree. First, I'm not aware of anyone that manufactures these with replaceable batteries (although admittedly I can't say for sure there aren't). Once of the best reason that these are sealed is because of moisture penetration. The inside of tires is far from being very dry air. Ambient moisture will corrode the components far sooner than every having to replace a battery. With all due respect, why does everyone always seem to think issues like this are all about gouging the customer?

dkozloski
06-21-13, 07:26 PM
If you have a little talent and some tools you can change these things without even taking the wheel and tire off the car.
Jack up the offending wheel and put the car on a jack stand.
Remove the valve core.
With a tire spoon pry the bead loose.(Talk to an oldtimer about what that is)
Take an Irwin ratchet clamp or two and squeeze the tire down until you can reach in between the bead and the tire.
Take the stem loose on the TPMS and take it out. Don't drop it.
Put the new TPMS in and get the stem through the hole in the wheel.
Torque the stem nut.
Put the valve core in the new stem if it isn't there already.
Squirt a little starting fluid in the gap between the bead and the rim.
Sweep your Cricket across the gap and watch the small explosion reset the bead.
Air up the tire and you're good to go.

If an old man can do it I'm sure that you young bucks can.

ezed1
06-21-13, 08:40 PM
I disagree. First, I'm not aware of anyone that manufactures these with replaceable batteries (although admittedly I can't say for sure there aren't). Once of the best reason that these are sealed is because of moisture penetration. The inside of tires is far from being very dry air. Ambient moisture will corrode the components far sooner than every having to replace a battery. With all due respect, why does everyone always seem to think issues like this are all about gouging the customer? lol! he has GM stocks:duck: