: What makes a "luxury" car today?



orconn
06-13-13, 03:08 PM
With all the techno tickee tackee available on virtually any car today what constitutes a "luxury" car today. Is it merely the price tag? Or is it its' wheel base and size? Is it a higher grade of leather (now that leather is available in just about anything over $20,000).

There is still prestige in a car's name plate, but when setting cars with a less prestigious badge side by side with the more revered brand is the difference really that obvious?

Have car makers run out of meaning items to make their products worthy of the luxury designation, or is this label only an advertising gimmick and affectation to draw in the socially insecure?

Submariner409
06-13-13, 03:12 PM
"What makes ................ ?" ................The amount of buzzword hype stuck in the advertising propaganda.

By ANY definition of 5 - 10 years ago a Hyundai Sonata with some performance/trim package would have been/is a "luxury car".

Today's mass-produced $65,000 tin can is no luxury car by any stretch. Start with Bentley or Rolls Royce and go up from there.

Jesda
06-13-13, 03:15 PM
Great question. Buick is trying to redefine it with the small Verano and Encore. Mercedes-Benz wants it to be about gadgets and features. Rolls Royce wants it to be about materials and customization.

It seems hard to define these days.

EcSTSatic
06-13-13, 03:18 PM
Cupholders!

Gone are the days of commercials like Chrysler's Ricardo Mantalban and "fine Corinthian leather". Commercials today tout technology.

77CDV
06-13-13, 03:42 PM
Name and price. That's it.

M5eater
06-13-13, 03:59 PM
Name and price. That's it.

one could argue this, given that luxury cars comparatively cost very little much more to make than their 'pedetrian' countparts.

I think that luxury these days means sporty intentions, design, and something that pleases the senses, maybe refinement as well. Your average brand new camry will still not ride as well as your average 5-7 year old S-class for example.

I think generally though, the days of old-luxury have been absorbed by the lower marques as mentioned, given that you can have leather in your civic if you really want to, and 'pedestrian' cars could be argued as bueatiful as their luxury counter parts. The last truely sucessful 'old luxury' brand I would say is Buick(which itself is going through a 'sporty and youthful' revolution), and that's only because the Chinese love the cars for some reason. Lincoln might as well not exist, and Cadillac of course, has completly reversed it's roles.

Luxury today I think means having your cake with old-luxury in comfort, soft-touch plastics and technology and eatting it too with fast powertrains, communicative chassis and excelent handling dynamics. I think it's far from a concidence that virtually all luxury brands rely on AWD or RWD platforms exlusively for their vehicles.


of course, this is only applicable in north america, in europe and the rest of the world, 3 series with 150hp engines sell by the dozen .

ben.gators
06-13-13, 04:24 PM
This is a very good question, and to be honest, I don't have any definite answer, as the boundaries between entry level cars and luxury cars are vanishing! Look at truckman's new Kia. It has stuff that the base ATS doesn't have! This is very confusing and it makes the task of drawing a line between different segments of the market very hard.

Luxury used to mean too much of something, more than you need, excessive amount. But these days luxury cars are shrinking in terms of physical size, engine size, engine HP, etc, and in the other side, the entry level cars come with almost any option that used to belong to luxury cars. So that old definition is not applicable anymore.

So I would say the name and price tag play an important role in definition of a luxury car. A high price tag creates some sort of exclusivity, and as a result not any kid on the block can go and buy one. So this exclusivity can be the definition of the new luxury cars, even though leasing makes it possible for almost any kid to lease an expensive car that he actually cannot afford to buy!

As posted before, I think at the end of the day it is all about the name, price, heritage, and hype.

RippyPartsDept
06-13-13, 05:16 PM
77CDV and ben.gators are on to something here

higher price brings exclusivity which is apparently the last bastion of luxury now that all the other luxurious qualities can be had by the plebes

Submariner409
06-14-13, 09:32 AM
............... but "luxury" connotes perfume trays, small wet bars, diamond tennis bracelets, rear seat desks, plush creature comforts and probably a chauffeur. (and NO "stretch limo" on earth is "luxury" - they're pure bling, nothing else.)

..........and that leaves all the 6- and 7- figure "sports cars" out of the "luxury" definition; The beginning price for a Ferrari 458 Italia of $240,000 is chump change in the real car world - and while truly exotic, a Ferrari is NOT "luxurious". Neither is a fully tricked out six-figure Corvette.

Ranger
06-14-13, 10:18 AM
1. Something inessential but conducive to pleasure and comfort.
2. Something expensive or hard to obtain.
3. Sumptuous living or surroundings.
4. indulgence in and enjoyment of rich, comfortable, and sumptuous living
5. Something that is considered an indulgence rather than a necessity
6. something pleasant and satisfying

EcSTSatic
06-14-13, 11:02 AM
1. Something inessential but conducive to pleasure and comfort.
2. Something expensive or hard to obtain.
3. Sumptuous living or surroundings.
4. indulgence in and enjoyment of rich, comfortable, and sumptuous living
5. Something that is considered an indulgence rather than a necessity
6. something pleasant and satisfying

I'd say all but #3 and #4 are going into the top end packages of most cars today. These two might separate luxury from 'loaded'.

thebigjimsho
06-14-13, 12:23 PM
Luxury, to me, is all about me being content behind the wheel.

My Town Car has some with the ride(not as good as my '04 TC) and sense of relief when sinking into the seat. However, the seats can irritate on long drives and I have very little in options on the Executive Series. People in the back, though, are happy and that's what I care about.

My V had Recaros. Many complained of them being firm. The support was truly amazing. 27 hours from San Antonio to NJ, 20 hours from Ottawa to St Cloud, MN or 30 hours from Charlotte to Worcester, MA(with a side trip to Tail of the Dragon for a few runs, the Cherahola Skyway, Pigeon Forge, a couple hours on the Blue Ridge Parkway starting at 1AM and then sleeping in the car for 3 hours in a Sheetz parking lot in Staunton, VA until sunrise) all didn't matter. Those seats were all day, every day comfortable. Add the magnetic ride control. The V would still be firm to most standards today. But, to do what it could do in terms of power, speed, stopping and handling? And with comfort? That, to me, is luxury.

Aron9000
06-15-13, 12:48 AM
Luxury to me is about excess. Something like a Bentley or Rolls is wretched excess, nobody needs 500+hp, wood trim from an old growth rain forrest, lambs wool for rugs, and 10 dead cows to sit on. The more excessive your car, the more luxurious it is.

Which is why I don't think entry level $35,000 executive sedans are luxury cars. Take a C250 Mercedes, its $35,000, the back seat is tight, the trunk is small, the seats are vinyl, and it has a 200hp 1.8 turbo 4 that gets similar mileage to a v6 Altima or Camry(which are way faster and have a lot more room).

Really you don't start getting into what I consider a luxury car until you option up some of these base cars up past 45k with the 300+hp six cylinder engines.

orconn
06-15-13, 01:22 AM
If exclusivity is the deciding factor in what constitutes a true "luxury" product then nothing you can do to a C class or a # series or a CTS, or even any of these cars more exalted and more expensive brethren. I agree with Sub that today real "luxury" class automobiles start north of $150,000. This was born out a few years ago when even Mercedes had to reinvent the old subsidiary to have a product in the true "Luxury" class.

Let's face it most salaried members of the top 5% of American wage earners can, it doesn't take capital wealth and the income (and tax benefits) from same, to afford an S class or even a Bentley these days, maybe a few sacrifices (for the Bentley) to lease a $100,000. (or more) car. An hour standing on a corner of Rodeo and Wilshire in Beverly Hills will confirm this assertion.

So if Cadillac wants to have something more than "executive" transportation in their lineup they had better be having plans to produce the Ciel or the Sixteen!

lacville78
06-15-13, 03:57 AM
True luxury begins with weight and wheelbase. Room and ride comfort should come first, and handling second. This is the reason Rolls Royce still builds long and heavy cars. Yesterday's luxury included long lasting drive trains that were able to be serviced and provide reliability for many years. Today's luxury drive train is focused more on power and economy. Of course technology, options, and features have always been a staple of a luxury vehicle; they should never be relied upon to distinguish luxury vehicles from the rest.

This way of modern thinking has lead to nothing more than domestic automakers building rough riding, sporty cars with excessive power. It is a shame, and I hope things change soon.

thebigjimsho
06-15-13, 10:28 AM
True luxury is me p00ping on a feather-laden toilet. THAT is true luxury.

Don't push your idea of "true" luxury on the rest of us...

vincentm
06-15-13, 01:34 PM
True luxury is me p00ping on a feather-laden toilet. THAT is true luxury.

Don't push your idea of "true" luxury on the rest of us...

Thats makes for an itchy ass, if thats your thing scratch away. Jusy dont do so while driving lol

talismandave
06-15-13, 02:33 PM
Don't push your idea of "true" luxury on the rest of us...


I have seen a question asked, and about 11 different people post their various differing responses.
Do we need to change the thread title to....
"What makes a "luxury" car today!Unless your opinion differs from Jim's!"?:bigroll:

orconn
06-15-13, 02:46 PM
Nobody is trying to "push" you to accepting a definition of "luxury." But the definition of "luxury" that you sighted with your Lincoln Town Car doesn't really hold water either. I.E. many of today's long haul truckers are surrounded with all kinds of gadgets and accoutrement that make life behind the wheel safer and more comfortable, however, few would consider their environment "luxurious." I still maintain that in our society "true luxury" has more to do with exclusivity, meaning today, that high monetary cost is the main measure of the quality of "luxury" in a product (particularly a car) than factors of technology, build quality and materials (although both main be a factor in price). Low production and high price are the main factors in the perception of true "luxury" .... when that does not suffice to enforce "exclusivity" then selectivity on the part of the seller is brought into play as with the Continental Mark II automobiles in the 1950's which were originally only sold to select high achievers in society, or Grosser Mercedes of the sixties with certain models reserved for "new" sale to heads of state.

thebigjimsho
06-15-13, 02:49 PM
Nobody is trying to "push" you to accepting a definition of "luxury." But the definition of "luxury" that you sighted with your Lincoln Town Car doesn't really hold water either. I.E. many of today's long haul truckers are surrounded with all kinds of gadgets and accoutrement that make life behind the wheel safer and more comfortable, however, few would consider their environment "luxurious." I still maintain that in our society "true luxury" has more to do with exclusivity, meaning today, that high monetary cost is the main measure of the quality of "luxury" in a product (particularly a car) than factors of technology, build quality and materials (although both main be a factor in price). Low production and high price are the main factors in the perception of true "luxury" .... when that does not suffice to enforce "exclusivity" then selectivity on the part of the seller is brought into play as with the Continental Mark II automobiles in the 1950's which were originally only sold to select high achievers in society, or Grosser Mercedes of the sixties with certain models reserved for "new" sale to heads of state.

Well, all my Town Car has is space and softness...

----------




I have seen a question asked, and about 11 different people post their various differing responses.
Do we need to change the thread title to....
"What makes a "luxury" car today!Unless your opinion differs from Jim's!"?:bigroll:

It's fine to state an opinion. I said luxury "to me"...

Someone then comes on here and states luxury IS weight and wheelbase and blah blah blah...

is3_ftw
06-15-13, 03:13 PM
My thoughts of a "luxury" car is, Full Size vehicles. Anything smaller, or sport packaged suspension, seats, etc. would be considered Sport Luxury. The Hyundai Genesis Sedan 5.0 is considered a luxury vehicle. Not because of the price tag, but it's a full size vehicle.
In other words, anything that can fit 5(5'8"-6') people comfortably, is considered "Luxury" in my book

thebigjimsho
06-15-13, 04:16 PM
My thoughts of a "luxury" car is, Full Size vehicles. Anything smaller, or sport packaged suspension, seats, etc. would be considered Sport Luxury. The Hyundai Genesis Sedan 5.0 is considered a luxury vehicle. Not because of the price tag, but it's a full size vehicle.
In other words, anything that can fit 5(5'8"-6') people comfortably, is considered "Luxury" in my book



116802

orconn
06-15-13, 04:21 PM
^^^ The Hyundai Genesis (and the Equus) and many other mid price range cars are considered "luxury" cars because their advertising firms have labeled them such, not because they really qualify as such.

ben.gators
06-15-13, 05:10 PM
If exclusivity is the deciding factor in what constitutes a true "luxury" product then nothing you can do to a C class or a # series or a CTS, or even any of these cars more exalted and more expensive brethren. I agree with Sub that today real "luxury" class automobiles start north of $150,000. This was born out a few years ago when even Mercedes had to reinvent the old subsidiary to have a product in the true "Luxury" class.

Let's face it most salaried members of the top 5% of American wage earners can, it doesn't take capital wealth and the income (and tax benefits) from same, to afford an S class or even a Bentley these days, maybe a few sacrifices (for the Bentley) to lease a $100,000. (or more) car. An hour standing on a corner of Rodeo and Wilshire in Beverly Hills will confirm this assertion.

So if Cadillac wants to have something more than "executive" transportation in their lineup they had better be having plans to produce the Ciel or the Sixteen!

I agree that a "true" luxury car starts north of $150k. But no luxury brand can survive just by selling $150k cars! They need to build and sell more affordable luxury cars to upper middle class that like to drive luxury cars, but can't afford to pay 150k for a car. This is some sort of win-win situation for both parties. C class MB, 3 and 5 series BMW, A4 Audi, and CTS have been bread and butter for car companies. I would call such cars, semi-luxury cars!

And by the way, all of those true luxury cars that are named in this thread, have been acquired by VW, BMW, or other major brands, and those luxury brands couldn't survive without the help of major car manufactures. Basically, # series BMW or Audi A4 and VW Passat pay the bills of Bentley or Rolls-Royce.

is3_ftw
06-15-13, 06:06 PM
I was meaning a sedan. Also, full size cars are not considered 5dr wagons, SUV, or a 4dr truck.
If its considered a $150k car is based on Bentley, Maserati, or Rolls Royce is stamped as luxury. Then no car below them shouldn't be viewed as luxury, but more of an affordable coach luxury.

orconn
06-15-13, 07:24 PM
In Europe and other parts of the world, the words "executive class" are used to describe cars affordable and enjoyed by the upper middle class. This term more appropriately to describe the socio-economics of these cars. Today many earning top 1% salaries do not find themselves able to easily afford a true "luxury" car.

amunderdog
06-15-13, 07:59 PM
A few things cross my mind:
Smooth ride that is never unsettled
Quit comfortable interior
Powerful dependable drivetrain
timeless styling
Above average build quality

CadillacLuke24
06-15-13, 08:26 PM
A few things cross my mind:
Smooth ride that is never unsettled
Quit comfortable interior
Powerful dependable drivetrain
timeless styling
Above average build quality

:stirpot: Given those exact parameters, and my experiences so far, I know of a DeVille that is a luxury automobile!! :D

IN MY OPINION, luxury is a car that has a number of things most homes wouldn't, while still being mobile. Super nice appointments, exotic build materials, all the latest whiz-bang gizmos, etc.

orconn
06-15-13, 08:38 PM
One thing we haven't mentioned as a characteristic of a true "luxury" automobile is the unequaled depreciation as soon as it is driven out the door of the agency. While mere "executive cars depreciate about 30% when they are driven out the door, a true "luxury" car will immediately depreciate 50% and then, and that little if one can even find a buyer. As many of us here at the Forums know the used "executive car is one of the great spreaders of wealth in American allowing the frugal to enjoy all the pleasures of owning an expensive car at a fraction of the price it would cost new. About the only give up is a bit of warranty, easily offset by savings in cost and that special pleasure of driving a "new" car!

thebigjimsho
06-15-13, 09:56 PM
^^^ The Hyundai Genesis (and the Equus) and many other mid price range cars are considered "luxury" cars because their advertising firms have labeled them such, not because they really qualify as such.

Umm, the Equus IS...

talismandave
06-15-13, 10:40 PM
It's fine to state an opinion. I said luxury "to me"...

Someone then comes on here and states luxury IS weight and wheelbase and blah blah blah...



(In my opinion.)

I am reasonably sure the poster was telling us what it means to them. I doubt he was posting what it is to someone else?
I generally assume people are posting their own opinions.
Even if you hadn't prefaced your statement with "to me" I think we would have figured out that it was your opinion.


To avoid any confusion on my future posts, and to save me having to add "to me" or "in my opinion" to every post, please assume any future posts made by me are, in deed, the way it seems "to me" and that anything I post "is my opinion" unless otherwise stated.

This will save me a lot of extra keystrokes, and help avoid confusion and prevent me from offending your sensibilities.:thumbsup"

orconn
06-15-13, 10:54 PM
^^^Perhaps you should prepared some boiler plate to that effect, Dave. Some have short memories here..

Aron9000
06-15-13, 11:17 PM
I'll assert it again:

Luxury=Excess

This can also apply to horsepower. Nobody NEEDS a 567hp CTS-V, or a 627hp ZR1 Vette. Hell nobody needs an old rusty 1974 Vega with a 1500hp blown, nitrous fed big block Chevy that runs a mid 7 second quarter mile.

Luxury can also apply to how impractical your car is. A #1 concourse winning Duesenberg is like a million bucks. You don't dare drive such a car on the street, you just polish it and admire its awesomeness.

So what I'm saying is that impractical toys like what I mentioned above might not be luxurious in terms of comfort, with them being noisy, hard riding, no power steering, manual transmission with no syncros, etc, etc, etc Yet clearly there is no "rational" reason for owning such cars, they are your passion. If you have the bankroll for indulging yourself in some of the finest machinery money can buy, I consider it luxurious.

ben.gators
06-16-13, 03:34 AM
In Europe and other parts of the world, the words "executive class" are used to describe cars affordable and enjoyed by the upper middle class. This term more appropriately the socio-economics of these cars. Today many earning top 1% salaries do not find themselves able to easily afford a true "luxury" car.

If we want to exclude the "executive class" cars from luxury cars, and restrict the definition of luxury cars to the ones with 150k price tag and higher, then the answer to your main question would be pretty easy. Everyone, even the people who are not car guys, wouldn't have any problem in discriminating between a Rolls Royce and a Kia forte.

The main challenge is the distinction between "semi-luxury" cars (or based on your terminology the "executive class" cars) and new fully loaded entry level cars. I initially thought your main question was about this part. 20 years ago these classes of cars used to be very distinct from each other. But these days they are getting so close that we can not draw a solid boundary line between "semi-luxury" cars and the regular midsized family sedans.

amunderdog
06-16-13, 11:20 AM
:stirpot: Given those exact parameters, and my experiences so far, I know of a DeVille that is a luxury automobile!! :D


Why yes it is:)
Here in America anyway as far as mass produced vehicles go Cadillac is at the top.
They tried using Cadillac badges on other cars and loading them with options - Failure - nearly killed the brand.
So there must be more to it than wiz bang options.

Did you ever study the GM line up?
If I remember correctly
You got a Chevy
Then a
Pontiac
Buick
Cadillac
Oldsmobile

thebigjimsho
06-16-13, 11:38 AM
Saturn

cadillac kevin
06-16-13, 12:43 PM
Why yes it is:)
Here in America anyway as far as mass produced vehicles go Cadillac is at the top.
They tried using Cadillac badges on other cars and loading them with options - Failure - nearly killed the brand.
So there must be more to it than wiz bang options.

Did you ever study the GM line up?
If I remember correctly
You got a Chevy
Then a
Pontiac
Buick
Cadillac
Oldsmobile

IIRC, you got a chevy (entry level), then a pontiac (slightly nicer entry level), then olds (more at performance than luxury)/ buick (more at luxury than performance), then cadillac (both luxury and performance).

thebigjimsho
06-16-13, 02:33 PM
IIRC, you got a chevy (entry level), then a pontiac (slightly nicer entry level), then olds (more at performance than luxury)/ buick (more at luxury than performance), then cadillac (both luxury and performance).

Pontiac used to be the performance division. Oldsmobile was the pioneering division that would innovate. And Buick was the poor man's luxury w/performance...

Hoosier Daddy
06-16-13, 02:41 PM
What makes a "luxury" car today
My general rule is: if I can afford it, it's not a luxury car.

Rick Neighbors
06-17-13, 04:17 PM
One of the most "comfortable" cars I ever owned was a 1951 Cadillac Funeral Car. Manual transmission, 3 on the tree, but it floated down the highway like a cloud. :)

----------

But I also got a trophy at the local dragstrip with that funeral car because there wasn't anyone in my class. :)

CadillacLuke24
06-17-13, 04:32 PM
My general rule is: if I can lease it and manage to keep, if just barely, from plunging into financial disater, it's not a luxury car.

Fixed. :D

lacville78
06-17-13, 09:00 PM
When looking at a sedan, consider the rear door. Is there actually ample room to sit an adult in the rear, or is it just a cheap gimmick? Most modern "Luxury cars" will make someone very unconfortable in the rear. They will have no leg room, and their knees will hit the back of the front seat. Which leads to my general rule: If it hits, its s*!t.

A luxury cars job is to provide its occupants with comfort. If the car can't do that, then it is not a luxury car. It may be an expensive car, a fast car, but not a luxury car; although, people and manufacturers may claim otherwise.

talismandave
06-17-13, 09:27 PM
This was once!

http://chicago.craigslist.org/chc/cto/3859428743.html

CadillacLuke24
06-17-13, 09:34 PM
I'd agree with that observation Dave :D


When looking at a sedan, consider the rear door. Is there actually ample room to sit an adult in the rear, or is it just a cheap gimmick? Most modern "Luxury cars" will make someone very unconfortable in the rear. They will have no leg room, and their knees will hit the back of the front seat. Which leads to my general rule: If it hits, its s*!t.

A luxury cars job is to provide its occupants with comfort. If the car can't do that, then it is not a luxury car. It may be an expensive car, a fast car, but not a luxury car; although, people and manufacturers may claim otherwise.

Notch another one for the 96 DeVille :duck:

lacville78
06-17-13, 09:52 PM
This was once!

http://chicago.craigslist.org/chc/cto/3859428743.html

Great find, I hope someone fixes her up.

cadillac kevin
06-18-13, 12:46 AM
Great find, I hope someone fixes her up.
needs some serious TLC. note the rust under the top. Also note the former top color of the car in the door jambs...thats some faded paint!
It would be a cool car. I often wonder what a notchback seville would look like with the windshield raked back an inch or 2....it would make the car make so much more elegant.

talismandave
06-18-13, 01:25 AM
Hated those for years, now much like the 73 Riviera I couldn't stand in their day, I have grown to love the oddity of their design. What I really didn't like was the similar look to certain X bodies of the day.

I mentioned that one to a friend who just got rid of an 80s Jag. (Figuring he was a masochist and might want to buy it!:abuse:)

Pillow
06-19-13, 12:58 PM
Oddly enough I debated between the CTS-V and a 67-73 RR Sliver Shadow for daily. The only reason the Shadow lost was because I like to shift. There is no substitute for the quality of parts that go into these RR cars. Even being decades old they are more solid than many of todays new plastic cars. And yes the wool floors mats are the tits!

Shoot my old Porsche 911SC is still killing some modern cars! Lord knows it is much more gratifying to drive as a purist that these gizmo rockets.

Whoever is bagging on the Hyundia Genesis sedan hasn't driven one. I'd take it over a 3 or 5 any day (excluding Ms).

IMO the only really cool feature that hasn't been out since the 70s is rain sensing wipers. I do like that on the current Cadillacs.

I think it is like art, you know Luxury when you see it. And thank you to the poster who mentioned "executive sedan", which is what most yuppies and dinks drive.

orconn
06-19-13, 01:40 PM
^^^ While value of enjoyment may not have a price tag, the cost of ownership does! You made a wise decision opting for the CTS-V verses an old Rolls-Royce. All the things that go into a Rolls-Royce certainly have their value in the pleasure that they give the owner and some would say they are worth the price!

pjblush
06-19-13, 03:44 PM
I think many of you have mentioned the physical attributes of a luxury car, but I have one more that I would like to add. My dealer says that they treat you like a Cadillac owner. That is real luxury. My car is picked up for service and returned to me looking beautiful with service completed. Their personnel are just outstanding. Now for a second car to run all of my stop and start errands, I have an Chevrolet Equinox. It is a very nice car and the dealership is very good. However, the car does not ride or have the feel of our Cadillac. The dealer is very nice and gives me good service, but it is not Cadillac service. I believe luxury begins with the dealer. We live in the San Antonio, TX area and my dealer is Cavender Cadillac. Even though we have a 2010 DTS, we are treated as if we have the most expensive car that Cadillac makes. Can't beat that "luxury" feeling.

orconn
06-19-13, 03:57 PM
No doubt about it "service" from the dealership contributes greatly to one's satisfaction and valuation of a car.

Jesda
06-20-13, 01:11 AM
Indeed. No matter how bland Lexuses tend to be (to me), they treat their customers like five-star guests.

Cadillac has a VERY long way to go in that regard.

orconn
06-20-13, 01:15 AM
Yes, Lexus came a long way in providing the service they claimed to provide. Maybe there is hope for Cadillac, but the company's history as the mavens of better mediocrity doesn't bode well!

lacville78
06-20-13, 03:45 AM
"better mediocrity" haha, I like that.

Yup, Cadillac is a long way from what they should be. Whatever happened to "Standard of the World"?

I am tired of seeing overly complicated Cadillac Economy/ Go-fast cars, and the new Escalade looks like Cadillac went to Autozone, bought some fake louvers and L.E.D. Rope Lights and called it a day.

Shame!! I mean really, this needs to stop, for them to go from building cars of equal or better quality than Rolls Royce to building Mercedes/ Nissan imitations. It just boggles my mind.

My advice to them would be to listen to Leyland's words, "It is easy to get cooperation for mediocre work, but one must sweat blood for a chance to produce a superior product,"

"If his work be merely mediocre, he will be left severely alone--if he achieves a masterpiece, it will set a million tongues a-wagging."

And lastly, "That which is good or great makes itself known, no matter how loud the clamor of denial That which deserves to live--lives."

This means Cadillac should dump this horrible sports/luxury, rebadged Chevrolet Tahoe business, and actually do what that are supposed to do; which is build the best true luxury automobiles in the world!

orconn
06-20-13, 03:54 AM
The Escalade is a pseudo Cadillac for the "pickup" set!

orconn
06-20-13, 05:54 AM
The question, Lacville, is whether they can make money building the "the best luxury cars in the world." truth be told, probably not. The Germans, the French, the Japanese, and maybe the Koreans, know what top of the heap is ....some in the Cadillac realm may know but are over ruled. So we will never see a Cadillac worthy of the title "Standard of the World" again! Sad but probably true.

It is unlikely that a n American producer of "executive" cars will feel the need for the prestige of a first class product.

RippyPartsDept
06-20-13, 08:52 AM
The new escalade is supposed to be "significantly differentiated" from the tahoe/yukon/suburban ... at least on the interior ... you know the exterior will be different

also there will be no EXT in the next body style esky

CadillacLuke24
06-20-13, 02:32 PM
The new escalade is supposed to be "significantly differentiated" from the tahoe/yukon/suburban ... at least on the interior ... you know the exterior will be different

also there will be no EXT in the next body style esky

If the Corvette's interior is any indicator of GM's capabilities, maybe it will be. :stirpot:

CTSCHICK
06-20-13, 07:12 PM
indeed. No matter how bland lexuses tend to be (to me), they treat their customers like five-star guests.

Cadillac has a very long way to go in that regard.

bingo

Even though it is nicer and easier than my past Chevy, Pontiac experiences it is still a major failure

truckinman
06-24-13, 03:50 AM
Luxury is in the eye of the beholder. Far as I'm concerned there's no one meaning or phrase which will define "luxury" far as the modern day automobile goes. Sure you've got terms like heritage which Mercedes definitely has. But so does ford. But does that make ford more of a luxury car than say a Lexus which has only been around since the late 80's?

It's just one of those debates to which you'll not come upon a definite conclusion. Maybe you'll here a description that settles the debate in your eyes, but again; luxury lies within the eye of the beholder.