: Which Freon is the best to buy??



drod777
05-17-13, 10:41 PM
A/C is low on freon and I am wanting to know which R-134A is better to purchase??

repnatl
05-18-13, 01:05 AM
Never noticed a difference between walmart other parts stores or even that synthetic freeze cans they all do they same according to my infrared in the dash

wrupert
05-18-13, 10:21 AM
Not sure why parts stores even sell this because there are so many variables when adding product to your a/c. 1st - Why is it low? These are a sealed systems that do not just "loose" product unless there is a leak somewhere. 2nd - Do you know how many lbs or oz you are low? These vehicles are VERY specific on how much product you have in the system. Too much is almost as bad as not enough. 3rd - Compressor oil, do you have enough in the system? During an a/c service you drain the oil out and add back 2-4 oz of new oil with dye depending on size of the system. 4th - You really need to have a vacuum on the system to pull the product in properly. If you push the product in and overcharge/pressure the system you will blow out seals, and if the reason you are leaking is due to a seal, your slow leak may turn into a large leak. This is just my 2 cents as I see tons of people do this, and it seems to the customer that it works as it blows colder air, but eventually it doesn't work anymore and then they bring it to me after screwing their a/c up worse and need more than a seal or valve core. R-134 is not as cold as the R-12 was, but the engineer's (can't believe i am saying this) actually designed the systems right. They have caculated how much product produces the coldest temperature. IE/ if a system was designed for 2lbs 4ozs, that is going to produce the coldest air. If if has 2lbs 1oz or 2lbs 8ozs, it will not blow as cold.

conedoctor
05-19-13, 12:15 PM
Not sure I could agree with that post more if I wanted to, awesome post!

drod777
05-21-13, 10:26 AM
Not sure why parts stores even sell this because there are so many variables when adding product to your a/c. 1st - Why is it low? These are a sealed systems that do not just "loose" product unless there is a leak somewhere. 2nd - Do you know how many lbs or oz you are low? These vehicles are VERY specific on how much product you have in the system. Too much is almost as bad as not enough. 3rd - Compressor oil, do you have enough in the system? During an a/c service you drain the oil out and add back 2-4 oz of new oil with dye depending on size of the system. 4th - You really need to have a vacuum on the system to pull the product in properly. If you push the product in and overcharge/pressure the system you will blow out seals, and if the reason you are leaking is due to a seal, your slow leak may turn into a large leak. This is just my 2 cents as I see tons of people do this, and it seems to the customer that it works as it blows colder air, but eventually it doesn't work anymore and then they bring it to me after screwing their a/c up worse and need more than a seal or valve core. R-134 is not as cold as the R-12 was, but the engineer's (can't believe i am saying this) actually designed the systems right. They have caculated how much product produces the coldest temperature. IE/ if a system was designed for 2lbs 4ozs, that is going to produce the coldest air. If if has 2lbs 1oz or 2lbs 8ozs, it will not blow as cold.

Thanks Very Much for that information, I do in fact now Think there is a leak because its not getting as cold as it once was when I put the freon in. I will get it serviced with all the other issues I have been having.

The Wrench
05-22-13, 07:29 PM
I can certainly agree also; with the exception that even a perfectly working and tight system could lose a small amount of freon over long periods of time. Way back when, my AC tech told me that perfectly good R12 systems would lose about a pound in about 5 years thru small seepage around the compressor shaft seal, and through the pores in the hoses. The R134 is a smaller molecule, and thus more prone to this type leakage; but the mfgs have greatly improved the materials over the years. But, I could see where a 9-year-old system could have no real leakage problem, and still begin to lose cooling efficiency. And, as stated above, the solution is not to blindly throw a can at it, but to check it out thoroughly, fix any issues if found, replace the drier, evacuate, then add the exact specified amount of freon.
R134 is so cheap (I actually found a sale at Napa for $3 last winter) that is makes sense to do it right - priced a compressor or a hose lately?
Oh, check the front of the condensor for bugs/trash.

DG