: Priming the coolant fluid



dugunz
05-17-13, 05:23 AM
I overheated yesterday and found I block off hose that was cracked and dry rotted causing a leak. I replaced the hose and filled the radiator tank to the top with fluid. (Took about 3/4 gallon) The car is still running hot after a short drive... Do I need to prime the system? How would I do that? I don't even know where to start.

rchern
05-17-13, 10:36 AM
When you say you topped it off with fluid, you do mean a mixture of fluid and water right?

arw1510
05-17-13, 11:10 AM
When you say you topped it off with fluid, you do mean a mixture of fluid and water right?

That would depend on the fluid? If its already prediluted or not

rchern
05-17-13, 12:58 PM
That would depend on the fluid? If its already prediluted or notI didn't know that some came prediluted. I have a container of GM Dexcool and their instructions want you to mix it with water. I'll have to pay attention in the future.

CTSCHICK
05-18-13, 03:56 PM
You probably either need to add more coolant or you have air pockets in the coolant, these cars don't have bleeders like the older cars used to.
They fill the coolant coolant systems with a vacuum system hooked to an air line now that forces air in to the system to check for leaks than that air is used to suck the new coolant in while pushing all of the air out of the coolant system.

I bought my b.f. one a few years ago for Christmas it is pretty cool to watch he hooks it the radiator or coolant overflow tank depending on the car then hooks the air line to it to pressurize the coolant system, Then lets it sit there pressurized while monitoring the vacuum gauge after he is sure the system is holding pressure.
he puts a hose into a coolant container then hits the switch on the gauge then all of thar pressurized air in the system sucks the coolant in while pushing all of the air out.

HurstGN
05-19-13, 06:28 PM
You probably either need to add more coolant or you have air pockets in the coolant, these cars don't have bleeders like the older cars used to.
They fill the coolant coolant systems with a vacuum system hooked to an air line now that forces air in to the system to check for leaks than that air is used to suck the new coolant in while pushing all of the air out of the coolant system.

I bought my b.f. one a few years ago for Christmas it is pretty cool to watch he hooks it the radiator or coolant overflow tank depending on the car then hooks the air line to it to pressurize the coolant system, Then lets it sit there pressurized while monitoring the vacuum gauge after he is sure the system is holding pressure.
he puts a hose into a coolant container then hits the switch on the gauge then all of thar pressurized air in the system sucks the coolant in while pushing all of the air out.

Almost. That system uses the pressurized air feed to create a vacuum in the system. The system is not pressurized, it is placed into a state of vacuum, typically 20-25". He's monitoring the vacuum reading to see if it holds a vacuum. Once the system is deemed to hold vacuum properly, then the opening of the valve allows the vacuum in the system to draw in the coolant. Placing the system under vacuum draws out the air eliminating air pockets when the vacuum is released drawing in the coolant.

CTSCHICK
05-19-13, 08:36 PM
Close enough for me ;)

ztollon
05-20-13, 06:05 PM
If its the upper hose fill hose full of coolant so it fills the block, holdig the hose straight up allows air pockets to escape, hook ut back up top off the fluid. Then run the vehicle with the heat on full blast with the cap off. That should get the rest of the air out.. if that doesn't work your t-stat is faulty or another hose is messed up. Thats straight from all-data btw..

tinman
05-21-13, 08:01 AM
Always use distilled water, too. Not tap water. Maybe it is time for a flush 'n' fill.