: 2002-2006 Escalade Shocks/AirRide/AutoRide Quick Facts



gmercedesbenz
02-02-13, 02:17 PM
2002-2006 Escalade Shocks/AirRide/AutoRide Quick Facts

- The Escalade employs 2 different systems in regards to the shocks on the truck. The first, is active dampening or "Autoride". This system uses sensors to monitor various aspects of the truck, such as hand-wheel position, speed and vehicle roll. The truck then adjusts each shock's stiffness based on the information provided by the sensors.

- The 2nd system, is the auto-leveling system. This system uses a compressor to fill rubber "bags" with air on both rear shocks. When these bags fill with the compressed air, the rear of the truck raises, thus keeping it level when towing or filled with cargo.

- Tahoe, Yukon and Escalade shocks, regardless of "Autoride" are NOT interchangeable. Each shock has a code stamped on it, to identify which system it belongs with. For example, the front OEM shocks of my Escalade have the code T6P, which if you search for shocks for a 2002 Escalade on GMPartsDirect or similar website, you will see it gives you a number of codes to choose from before giving you a list of shocks to buy.

- The T6P code looks to be the standard for front shocks on Escalades '02-'06. Be sure to check yours if you plan to replace your shocks with OEM replacements.

- Arnott's front shock solution for Escalades is a passive system, meaning it does not use information from the car to adjust itself. When you order these shocks, Arnott includes 2 resistors, to plug into each plug that would normally plug into the shock. This fools the truck into thinking you have OEM shocks installed and prevents any errors from showing on your dash.

-Arnott also offers two different types of rear shocks, Passive and OEM Active. The passive shocks, like the fronts from Arnott, do not use information from the truck to adjust themselves. However, these shocks do still use the Auto-Leveling System to keep the truck level. The OEM Active shocks are direct replacements for your original rear shocks, which retain auto dampening.

-Front OEM replacement shocks are extremely expensive, the cheapest I found was $399 per shock.

-Monroe and Suncore both make after-market replacements which retain the electronic dampening on the front. Monroe's is less expensive and both carry the same warranty.

the cadillac man
02-02-13, 04:33 PM
2002-2006 Escalade Shocks/AirRide/AutoRide Quick Facts

- The Escalade employs 2 different systems in regards to the shocks on the truck. The first, is active dampening or "Autoride". This system uses sensors to monitor various aspects of the truck, such as hand-wheel position, speed and vehicle roll. The truck then adjusts each shock's stiffness based on the information provided by the sensors.

- The 2nd system, is the auto-leveling system. This system uses a compressor to fill rubber "bags" with air on both rear shocks. When these bags fill with the compressed air, the rear of the truck raises, thus keeping it level when towing or filled with cargo.

- Tahoe, Yukon and Escalade shocks, regardless of "Autoride" are NOT interchangeable. Each shock has a code stamped on it, to identify which system it belongs with. For example, the front OEM shocks of my Escalade have the code T6P, which if you search for shocks for a 2002 Escalade on GMPartsDirect or similar website, you will see it gives you a number of codes to choose from before giving you a list of shocks to buy.

- The T6P code looks to be the standard for front shocks on Escalades '02-'06. Be sure to check yours if you plan to replace your shocks with OEM replacements.

- Arnott's front shock solution for Escalades is a passive system, meaning it does not use information from the car to adjust itself. When you order these shocks, Arnott includes 2 resistors, to plug into each plug that would normally plug into the shock. This fools the truck into thinking you have OEM shocks installed and prevents any errors from showing on your dash.

-Arnott also offers two different types of rear shocks, Passive and OEM Active. The passive shocks, like the fronts from Arnott, do not use information from the truck to adjust themselves. However, these shocks do still use the Auto-Leveling System to keep the truck level. The OEM Active shocks are direct replacements for your original rear shocks, which retain auto dampening.

-Front OEM replacement shocks are extremely expensive, the cheapest I found was $399 per shock.

-Monroe and Suncore both make after-market replacements which retain the electronic dampening on the front. Monroe's is less expensive and both carry the same warranty.

One correction the auto ride works the air shock compressor(I have the wiring diagrams as there is only one module) and the rear is dropped some at 55mph to increase stability but your right on the price