: 2012+ Performance Thread For LFX 3.6L V6 Engine - Discussion & Resources



X E Ryder
01-06-13, 01:22 PM
Hello Fellow LFX Running CTS Owners!

Since you are reading this, you have probably figured out there are limited resources as yet, for the new LFX revision of our 3.6 V6 Engines. This thread will be our resource for sharing all available parts & modifications. I will edit my original posting as things become available to us and hope LFX owners will help in this thread.

What are my qualifications? I have built and raced more vehicles than I can easily recount, and I have no problem admitting when I do not know something, but in that case I will research it! My CTS is fun to drive, but I would like to see an intake, throttle body mod, exhaust, PCM tune and catch can on my car. That simple recipe provides a nice bump in power to many modern vehicles. Remember to always think Combination, not single mods. :)

All vendors, I invite you to post the availability of your parts for our LFX engines here With Part Numbers please, as well as your contact information. I for one am ready to spend some money. Do you like money? Mine is on the table!

All members, please post links to parts you find that fit the LFX, and be sure to check with the vendors; I have found several already claiming they fit 2012 cars and after inquiring they back pedal admitting they don't know if they fit the LFX!

To start, let's hear from GM on what exactly the variable valved timed LFX engine IS. Some curious changes have been made that hint at where GM is heading with all engines. The following comes direct from the GM powertrain website found here: http://www.gmpowertrain.com/VehicleEngines/PowertrainProducts.aspx (there is some great info there as well about your transmission)

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Overview
A new, more powerful and more efficient version of the 3.6L direct-injected V-6 known by its LFX engine code.

Compared to the engine it replaces, the new LFX 3.6L V-6 features:


New cylinder head design with integrated exhaust manifold
Improved intake port design and larger intake valves within the cylinder heads
Longer-duration intake camshafts
Composite intake manifold
New fuel pump and isolated fuel rail
New, optimized-flow fuel injectors
Structural front cover and cylinder block enhancements
Stronger and lighter-weight connecting rods
Camshaft cap and throttle body design enhancements
E85 ethanol capability


"The changes to the 3.6L V-6 represent greater refinements to an already well-balanced package, including the use of new, lighter-weight components and enhancements designed to improve performance, efficiency and durability." GM (I have underlined some interesting pieces of information!)

Aluminum Engine Block and Integral Oil Pan
The 3.6L V-6 VVT's engine block is cast from A319 aluminum alloy. This aluminum-intensive construction means less weight and greater efficiency than conventional cast-iron engines and less weight translates to improved vehicle fuel economy. The sand-mold-cast block features strong cast-in iron bore liners, six-bolt main caps, and inter-bay breather vents. A cast aluminum oil pan is stiffened to improve powertrain rigidity and reduce vehicle vibration.

Rotating Assembly with Oil-Spray Cooled Pistons
The crankshaft is manufactured from forged steel, while the connecting rods are made of powdered metal that features a higher ratio of copper, which makes them stronger and enables them to be lighter. The V-6 VVT engine family was developed with pressure-actuated oil squirters in all applications. The jets reduce piston temperature, which in turn allows the engine to produce more power without reducing long-term durability.

Integrated Cylinder Heads/Exhaust Manifolds
The LFX's new cylinder head design has a revised intake port design that enhances airflow to the combustion chambers. Larger-diameter intake valves are used in the heads and work in conjunction with new, longer-duration intake camshafts to provide the engine's boost in horsepower. By using larger valves and holding them open longer, more of the air is pulled into the combustion chamber, for a more powerful combustion. The exhaust manifold is incorporated with the cylinder head, which saves weight, reduces complexity and helps promote a quicker light off of the catalytic converter, which further helps reduce emissions.

Direct Injection
Direct injection moves the point where fuel feeds into an engine closer to the point where it ignites, enabling greater combustion efficiency. It fosters a more complete burn of the fuel in the air-fuel mixture, and it operates at a lower temperature than conventional port injection. That allows the mixture to be leaner (less fuel and more air), so less fuel is required to produce the equivalent horsepower of a conventional, port injection fuel system. Direct injection also delivers reduced emissions, particularly cold-start emissions, which are cut by about 25 percent.

E85 Flex-Fuel Capability
E85 is a clean-burning, domestically produced alternative fuel composed of 85 percent ethanol alcohol and 15 percent gasoline. Ethanol is renewable and produces fewer greenhouse gas emissions in the combustion process. It can be produced from various feed stocks, including corn and wheat stalks, forestry and agricultural waste and even municipal waste. (I have seen 85 octane at the pump in Utah - it's coming...)

Dual Overhead Cams with Four Valves per Cylinder and Silent Cam Drive
Four-valves-per-cylinder with inverted-tooth chain cam drive contributes to the smoothness and high output of the LFX. The engine incorporates a timing chain with an inverted tooth design. These smaller links engage at a lower impact speed, which decreases the noise generated. In conjunction with the smaller pitch chain, the number of teeth on the sprockets are increased, which increases the meshing frequency and further reduces noise and vibration. Four valves per cylinder and a silent chain valvetrain contribute to both smoothness and high output. Four-cam phasing changes the timing of valve operation as operating conditions such as rpm and engine load vary.

Variable Valve Timing
Variable valve timing (VVT), or cam phasing, helps the LFX deliver optimal performance and efficiency, and reduced emissions. It allows linear delivery of torque, with near-peak levels over a broad rpm range, and high specific output (horsepower per liter of displacement) without sacrificing overall engine response, or driveability. The system changes valve timing on the fly, maximizing engine performance for a variety of operating conditions. At idle, for example, the cam is at the full advanced position, enabling exceptionally smooth idle quality. Under other operating demands, cam phasing adjusts to deliver optimal valve timing for performance, driveability and fuel economy. At high rpm it might retard timing to maximize airflow through the engine and increase horsepower. At low rpm it can advance timing to increase torque. Under light-load driving it can retard timing at all engine speeds to improve fuel economy.

Composite Intake Manifold and Fully Isolated Composite Camshaft Covers
The upper intake manifold for the LFX is made from composite material and provides mass savings over an aluminum manifold, with a carefully designed structure that helps ensure quiet engine operation. The surfaces on the cam covers are shaped to limit the broadcasting of undesirable noise, and the covers use isolating perimeter gaskets, as well as isolating radial lips around the tubes that accommodate the spark plugs. These effectively de-couple the covers from vibration generated in the block and engine during combustion. Acoustic dampening has also been added for additional NVH improvements.

Refinement, Durability and Maintenance
Additional changes incorporated in the LFX deliver greater refinement, quietness and durability, starting with revisions to the front cover. It was redesigned with additional support ribs on the backside and an additional fastener to improve noise and vibration characteristics. The cylinder block is modified slightly to accommodate the front cover's additional fastener. Also, the camshafts feature new saddle-type caps for improved durability. Finally, the throttle body is updated with a new, digital throttle position feature that eliminates a previous mechanical contact for more trouble-free operation.

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The fun part is going to be how we improve on this engine without compromise! :thumbsup:

X E Ryder
01-06-13, 01:34 PM
Well I suppose it is only fair I post what I am planning to do with my Coupe.

If I could "buy it today" here is where I would start on my car.

Cold Air Intake - Airaid - looks like a good product but not available yet - increasing the total surface area of your intake filter always helps!

TB Mod - I think there might actually be an available mod for the Throttle Body now - Vendors speak up!

Catch Can - So many modern engines need these! I think the auto manufacturers decided the only way to keep the EPA off their back was to dump all oil vapor into the combustion chamber (intake) which results in freaking Pools of oil slopping around - GROSS! Tracy I'm still waiting for a part number so I can buy this from you!

Cat back exhaust - Magnaflow maybe - not available for LFX yet - might go with cutouts instead as they worked great on my last build - I hate the factory "suitcase" mufflers though.

PCM Tune - I think Vince can do an LFX tune but I need to speak with him about this, hit me up Vince!

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tinman
01-07-13, 03:58 PM
I believe there is only one catch can for our engines. I could be wrong, but I just ordered mine a couple of weeks ago. Granted, I have a '10 3.6, but the can can't be any different (I believe).

jbelot
01-07-13, 07:10 PM
D3 CAI is available now. RX isolator, it is amazing, RX ported and polished TB also amazing, Trifecta tune. I have not done the tune yet but that is next after the D3 CAI. Those are the items I am or have done. I don't want to go with the exhaust, maybe later but I don’t want my car to be louder when I am driving it on a regular bases. I use my car all day and I love the quiet cockpit. It's great for business.

ajazolino
01-07-13, 08:40 PM
Remember, the 2012 and up now have the LFX engine. Not the LLT. so I'm not sure all of those items are available at this point. I know the iceolator is NOT available. Unless it changed in the past 24 hours.

jbelot
01-08-13, 10:37 AM
Ah. I did not read that this was for the 2012.

X E Ryder
01-08-13, 01:57 PM
Well I am pleased to say D3 is offering 3 options for Cat-back exhaust on the 3.6di for us 2012+ folks! When you call D3 ask for "Ro" and he can help set you up with any of the following options! The rundown is as follows:


Install a Stock CTS-V exhaust system with light modding, more power, a bit more volume.
The Corsa CTS-V exhaust system is quiet until you stand on it, modded to fit, more power.
For an aggressive "note" to your exhaust the Borla CTS (http://www.borla.com/products/cts_coupe_v6_20112012_rear_section_exhaust_touring _part__11824.html) kit is now listed compatible with 2012 models!

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(for reference, there is NO intake kit available and due to the "married" design of the new MAP sensor, attempts to "saw it off" the box and attach to aftermarket piping have thrown trouble codes and been unsuccessful at this time. Yes D3 tried it.)

X E Ryder
01-10-13, 01:37 PM
For those well versed in creating your own tunes and using A/F monitors, Summit is showing the following tuner available now for 2012+ CTS V6 models! You can adjust anything you want with this system. For those unfamiliar with custom tuning a late model engine, try a Trifecta tune.

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http://www.summitracing.com/parts/hpt-6011/applications/make/cadillac/model/cts?prefilter=1

X E Ryder
01-10-13, 02:34 PM
It was nice to see that K&N has now extended the part listing for their drop in high performance Air Filter up to 2013! All 2012+ LFX engine owners know the MAP sensor is part of the airbox now, so we cannot run the cold ait intake of the 2011- models.

I suppose for now this is our only intake option, I will let you know how it works out!

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http://www.knfilters.com/search/product.aspx?Prod=33-2411

Since the App guide at K&N shows this filter used for the 6.2L V model also, it MUST flow very well on our 3.6L Engines!

X E Ryder
01-12-13, 10:50 AM
Let's take a moment to discuss Air - Oil Separators, commonly called "Catch Cans". Since when do we need one and why?

Pollution. The short version is, as we tried to get more responsible towards the environment, auto manufacturers were faced with a troubling issue: Escaping oil vapors. Compared to exhaust, oil vapors are many times more harmful, because they retain both hydrocarbons and other unburnt pollutants. Allowing them to escape in the atmosphere was not an option, so what to do? Use a vacuum line and suck them back into the engines intake tract, so the motor can burn the oil, and the catalytic converter can hopefully bake off what is left. Does it work? Mostly... for awhile.

If you spend some time with your right foot buried down the top of the engine, you are producing a lot more of this unwanted by-product than an average casual driver. The reason is that our engines are just air pumps, and the back of the piston is not burning, but moving just as much air around. Your hot engine has oil splashing all over inside the motor, and the vapors get picked up by this moving air, often called "windage". Over time you are going to move enough vapor that it will begin to condense and coat various parts of the intake tract. The oil vapors burning also leave deposits behind on your valves, combustion chamber, and inside the converters. All in all not a good thing for longevity of that performance we love.

For hard drivers like us, an Air - Oil Separator can allow the Air to pass by, and the Oil vapor to accumulate into oil we can later drain off. Why don't manufacturers put these on our engines from the factory? That is up for discussion - my belief is it would stand as a billboard for the auto manufacturers, admitting they have a long way to go to make engines environmentally friendly. So for now it is our dirty little secret (literally). The PCV system and line name, literally stands for Positive Crankcase Ventilation.

So how does it work? There is a ball type check valve on the valve cover, with a 3/8" to 1/2" hose going directly back to the intake manifold. When your engine is running, vacuum pulls on this hose, allowing any blown-by vapors or windage to escape into the intake for burning in the combustion chamber. Some fresh air is allowed to enter via a breather line from the Airbox. We cut into the PCV hose to install the Air - Oil Separator and stop the oil from ever getting back to the intake.

Watch how fast oil collects under hard driving on this CTS-V with a special Clear separator can:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y9klkDCItEY
Looks like a tablespoon of oil in ONE (admittedly hard) driving session.

Do I need one? Go pull the PCV line where it connects to your intake manifold. If you can get a partial drop of oil on your finger here, there is likely quite a bit more accumulated inside your intake (you should pull the Throttle Body and clean out the plenum with a long reaching rod and rag). This would indicate you Can benfit from the simple install of a separator. If you are clean as a whistle, you are probably ok.

What makes a good Air - Oil Separator? Designs vary, but the bottom line is this: If you can pull the hose at the intake and you do not have oil residue any longer, your Catch Can is doing its job. I prefer the type that have a metal substrate mesh inside, this forces the vapors to touch and wrap around countless curves and smaller air paths. As the vapors twist and turn about the mesh, they cool and the oil condenses and builds up on the mesh, then dripping into the lower part of the can for disposal later (instead of going into your engine, fouling things up).
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Does this change my required maintenance? Not really. After you install an Air - Oil Separator, you should drive about 1500 miles and then take a look - you may have a few tablespoons in the can. If there is plenty of room still in the can, you are likely good to just empty it at your 3000 mile oil change - you can recyle that oil with your used oil. If you use the Oil Life system, then keep an eye on it until you know how fast you build oil up.

My engine is gunked up inside! Now what? Buy some SeaFoam, it eats and breaks down carbon. Dump a full can into 1/4 tank of gas and run it low. Get a second can and follow the directions for fuel injected engine cleaning, you can draw it from your catch can hose that goes into the intake. Don't let the engine "drink" it in too fast! Get a friend to help by barely touching the accelerator enough to keep it from dying while you draw in the cleaner. A MotorVac service would be an Excellent option also, if you know a shop doing them.
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This is the Moroso #85602 Separator kit for CTS-V (I used black #85603)
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Here is the RevExtreme Catch Can for CTS - Available in many colors.
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Another offering from Billet Technology - Different colors.
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X E Ryder
01-13-13, 10:49 PM
If you want to add a little power, there is a claimed gain of 5rwhp and 5rwtq from this Spiral Ported Throttle Body job done by Bad News Racing.

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You have to send them your TB and they mod it. Pay $365, but get $200 back as a core charge.

End cost $165

http://store.badnewsracing.net/2012-2013-CamaroCTS-36DI-Spiral-Port-Throttle-Body-LFX_p_74.html

Honestly I'm on the fence with this one because the TB bore diameter in MM is not changed and the butterfly is not replaced.

X E Ryder
01-13-13, 10:59 PM
For the 2012+ PCM tunes we currently have the Trifecta tune available from Bad News Racing also.

This will allow you to state what mods you have and get a tune tailored to your mods.

If it is not just so, you can work with BNR and get it right.

http://store.badnewsracing.net/Trifecta-Tune-2008-Cadillac-CTS-36L_p_57.html

Not sure if these tunes leave artifacts in the PCM the dealership can see or not - I need to ask about that.

If you pop your motor and the dealership discovers the PCM has been flashed you could be in hot water, for those in warranty.

X E Ryder
01-20-13, 09:42 PM
2012 LFX Borla 11824 Exhaust System

Well I put this on today and let me tell you I am SO HAPPY with it!

Zero Drone, Little to NO change in Cabin volume. My cruising is unaffected volume wise.

When you step on it though, WOW sounds really good!


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ermyxPR1ac

What is kind of funny is, listen how similar it sounds to This....


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xdj8yOsAUt8

To be honest I prefer my CTS - Much more versatile!

Pluto3
01-20-13, 11:48 PM
I'm assuming you have a Coupe...do you know if they have this same exhaust for the sedan, rwd?

X E Ryder
01-21-13, 11:49 AM
I'm assuming you have a Coupe...do you know if they have this same exhaust for the sedan, rwd?

Magnaflow has a kit for your Sedan, they have a quality product, I would trust whatever claims they make.

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http://www.magnaflow.com/02product/shopexd.asp?zone=all&id=9

SC2150
01-21-13, 02:00 PM
Good thread!

I wanted to add the Billet technologies and the Moroso are indentical in the inner make up both letting almost as much oil through as they catch, but far better than no can by far. The video is great to show just how much oil is contaminating the intake aircharge on these and other engines....they just dont show how much is getting pulled roght through the can and still into the intake.

To test any can, pick up a clear glass inline fuel filter between the can outlet (those cans have no designated inlet or outlet and if any need more details let me know) and the intake manifold vacuum barb. In 1-200 miles you will se how much oil is drawn right through the cans that are not very effective. All cans catch oil (even a beer can we tried with 2 barbs on it).

In all the testing we do of every can we find on the market we only endorse those that catch at least 80% of the oil allowing very little pull through (even though they are direct competitors).

The Elite engineering is a very good working can that lets very little oil through....so is the AMW & the Saiku Micchi.

The LFX we currently have the following products for:

CNC ported TB
After market cams
Ported cylinder heads
Forged pistons
Catchcan system that traps ALL the all
single turbo system
twin turbo system
front mount centrificul super charger system
Purpose built stall converters
(and more in the works).

Tune both Trifecta and HP Tuners. The Trifecta has a few more tables opened than HPT, but its coming along.

:thumbsup:

Pluto3
01-22-13, 12:54 PM
Magnaflow has a kit for your Sedan, they have a quality product, I would trust whatever claims they make.

<img src="http://www.cadillacforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=102713"/>

http://www.magnaflow.com/02product/shopexd.asp?zone=all&id=9

Seems like there is a lot of back and fourth with Magnaflow...seems like the price is great. I just don't want my Lac to sound like an import tuner!

X E Ryder
01-23-13, 04:34 PM
Seems like there is a lot of back and fourth with Magnaflow...seems like the price is great. I just don't want my Lac to sound like an import tuner!

I hear you! I see another user posted they had a corrosion issue - out here that is not a problem so news to me - I would definitely call them up and speak to them, ask direct questions! Where is a sound clip? What warranty is offered against corrosion? If the answers don't inspire confidence I'd pass on it.

I confess I called Borla and asked about drone issues, they guaranteed none. I hung up, called back, and asked a different person again! Same answer. THEN I bought mine. ;)

Pluto3
01-23-13, 09:53 PM
Do they make the same Borla exhaust for te sedan that you have? You seem to be overly satisfied and that's how I would like to be.....wasting gas just to hear my exhaust!

X E Ryder
01-23-13, 11:26 PM
Do they make the same Borla exhaust for te sedan that you have? You seem to be overly satisfied and that's how I would like to be.....wasting gas just to hear my exhaust!

Regrettably, they don't list a V6 system. I would call Magnaflow and ask about warranty for corrosion (to address what was posted). I have used their products without issue before.

Pluto3
01-24-13, 02:32 PM
Damn....that's too bad! Guess I will be going with Magnaflow. Its not a lot of people complaining about the drone issue. More good feedback than bad. Next move is to find a shop and see how much labor will be.

X E Ryder
01-25-13, 08:33 PM
How to Modify Your Own Throttle Body

You see people talking about polishing or boring, otherwise modifying the throttle body on a CTS. Well just what is it that’s going on here and how does it benefit you? You often hear your engine is just an air pump, and every time we can make it easier for the air to go through your engine, the engines going to work better. Granted, if you have a forced induction system, you will see a better benefit from this modification. But even a naturally aspirated engine can see a benefit. If memory serves correctly, somewhere on the order of 2rwhp from this mod on a 3.6 DI engine.

The short version is, the throttle bodies used on our engines are well made, but if they spent the kind of time on them to make them perfect, they’d have to charge twice as much for them. So what we’re going to do is put the time in ourselves. Seeing that we’re the ones who get to reap the benefits, that seems fair, doesn’t it? What you’re going to do is take a Dremel and remove all the ugly casting artifacts that were not machined out of your throttle body casting during production.

You will need the Dremel toolset shown below plus you’re going to want an 8mm socket and a 10 mm socket. A brand-new long bristled 1 inch paintbrush is helpful to gently whisk away the dust. For polishing, you’ll want a stick of Dico TC6 polishing compound, available at any hardware store (it looks like a red stick 6 inches long, 1 inch diameter, white and brown wrapper). A few pieces of Scotch Brite (yellow, red, green) are also very helpful. Finally, a can of “Mother’s” mag and aluminum polish with a cotton rag is good for finishing.

http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/XE-Ryder/TB%20Mod/XE-TB-Dremel_zps163cda6c.jpg


Disconnect the Negative battery cable (if you lock the trunk, you know how to get back in?)
Remove your engines top cover (remove oil fill-cap, gently pull up front)
Loosen the 8mm screw clamps at each end of the flexible rubber air intake boot
Remove the boot and set it on top the intake manifold (don’t remove fresh air pipe)
Gently pull the red locking clip from the throttle bodies wiring harness & unplug it
Remove the 410 mm bolts holding the throttle body, don’t let it fall off!


Now that you have the throttle body in your hand, inspect the casting for the unfinished areas and typical ridgelines left over from machining. The picture below shows the type of thing you will see. Run your finger over the edges like air will and note the many bumps, ridges and other-than-awesome transitions. Make sure you have a very well lit work surface; preferably high enough that you can stand comfortably and aluminum shavings won’t be a problem.

http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/XE-Ryder/TB%20Mod/XE-TB-Stock_zps435d03db.jpg

Set up your Dremel with a small bit shown below and the cable drive attachment. Set the tool to the lowest speed. If you’ve bought the set that I’ve shown in my picture you’ll have all the tools you need included. Now it’s time to have a “big pair”, and dive in with both feet. If you are inexperienced with a Dremel tool, be advised they try to skip off sometimes; if you have a piece of junk metal around it might be good to test on it first.

http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/XE-Ryder/TB%20Mod/XE-TB-Tool_zps8cd752d2.jpg

You’re going to remove material but not all the way around. Due to the way the throttle plate seals at the top looking from the outside, you won’t be able to get all the way around. Take a Sharpie marker, and put a mark inside the throat about a quarter inch from the plate at the top on either side. Were going to consider this our absolute limit to how far we’re going to take the tool. This will ensure you never get far enough to actually “Nick” the throttle plate, and that shall have a smooth transition from your work, to the castings original metal.

Remember all the work will be done on the outside / intake of the throttle body! The side that faces your intake manifold and engine will not be touched. I suggest you start on the bottom looking from the outside; you can work here with relative safety until you get the feel for the tool and the metal. This section is also the easiest and requires the least amount of work. As you can see in the photo below, I’m removing the ugly casting line in the transition of the boot area to the air horn. Just focus on smoothing out the bumps for now, and always be mindful of the thickness of the casting. We don’t want to burn through OMG! Remember, “Small moves Elly!”

http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/XE-Ryder/TB%20Mod/XE-TB-Cuttings_zpsd36ced6e.jpg

After you’ve made some progress, shut down the tool and use your paintbrush to whisk away the cuttings. I’m not a fan of high-pressure, big air hoses. We do not want to force metal into the shaft openings around the throttle plate with high-pressure air. The gentle bristles of the brush will easily brush away the cuttings. Now take a look at your work and run your fingers over each area. For those less experienced, you might be surprised how sensitive your finger is to surface imperfections. Trust your fingertip, and give the throttle body another round of gentle work until you are satisfied that the small cutting head has done all it can in the smaller areas.

Now you’re going to want to take the small sanding drum attachment, and smooth out the rough sand cast marks, in the area that the boot attaches to the outside of. You’ll also use the drum attachment to make smoother transitions from where your last bit knocked down the casting seems and imperfections. Again, take your time, take frequent breaks to brush away the dust and review your work in progress. I don’t think any of us want to purchase a new throttle body, so make sure you’re not in a hurry to drive off somewhere in an hour! The picture below shows the entry area after mini-drum sanding.

http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/XE-Ryder/TB%20Mod/XE-TB-Entry_zpsc5b8ba3d.jpg

When you’re satisfied that the drum attachment has smoothed all it can, it’s time to begin the polishing process. Clean things up with your dry paintbrush, and inspect your throttle body making sure there are no loose metal shavings still on it. Use your yellow, then red, and finally green Scotch Brite to smooth off as many imperfections as possible in your work area. Now tear off some of the paper from the Dico polishing compound, attach the small cotton drum polishing pad, and you can turn up the speed of the tool a little bit. Run the tool into the compound gently until it’s red from the compound. Start at the outer edge and run the polishing drum around the throttle body and you’ll note that it turns a smeared gray. Keep working the polishing pad in around a one by one inch area, and you notice the aluminum starts to brighten up.

http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/XE-Ryder/TB%20Mod/XE-TB-Rough_zps9387f4ee.jpg

If you don’t have a lot of experience polishing metals, don’t fret! As long as you’re not using too much speed or pressure the worst that can happen is it’s going to take you longer to get the job done. To finish, use the Mother’s polish and a cotton cloth. Keep after it until your finished product looks like the pictures below. The polishing stage could possibly take longer than the cutting did, so don’t be afraid to give it several goes, maybe even going back to Scotch Brite a couple times until you’re getting the smooth finish that matches what you have on the engine side of the TB (We are not working on head ports and there is no fuel to atomize up here). Only word of warning here: Do Not let the chuck of the Dremel drag on the TB; it will leave some ugly marks on it – you can fix them but you’d be adding to your work!

http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/XE-Ryder/TB%20Mod/XE-TB-Polished_zpsbe7bb1a5.jpg

Once you're smooth, clean and polished, it’s time to reinstall the throttle body on your engine. Reverse the removal process from above, and once your car is all back together, reattach your battery. Now your engine’s PCM will relearn the fuel trim tables based on the modification you’ve made over the next 50 miles or so. If you have other modifications such as exhaust, K&N filter, etc. these all contribute to your combination of improvements. I do have the modifications listed above (plus a catch can), and I can tell you that the total difference is very significant!

http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/XE-Ryder/TB%20Mod/XE-TB-Installed_zpsc52bd998.jpg

Now that wasn’t so hard now was it? You’ll be needing that money you saved by doing this mod yourself, to put in the gas tank with your new heavy right foot!

ztollon
01-26-13, 12:26 AM
This is awsome.. im so about to do this tmr after work..

SC2150
01-26-13, 12:43 PM
Great post! Except never polish the surface after your finished.....the smother and shinier a surface, the more drag and trubulence is created from that drag. Think golf ball dimples. A golf ball will fly app 1/2 as far if it has a smooth shiney surface than with the proer sized dimples. The v6 is so velocity sensitive you want nothing in the intake tract to cause the distrubance and slow the velocity like polishing does.

:thumbsup:

ztollon
01-26-13, 03:56 PM
I ported but not polished my throttle body. Dosent make too much of a difference. Id have to say throttle responses has increased slighty tho. Yea shes peppy

X E Ryder
01-26-13, 11:11 PM
X E Ryder’s Chilly Air Intake Mod For CTS 3.6DI

A few years ago, I figured out a way to improve even further on the cold air intake kits that were sold for Chrysler LX chassis vehicles. Because they already had a cold air intake on them, I called the mod the “chilly” air intake mod. The purpose of this mod, is to make sure your engine doesn’t breathe any stale air.

I’ve decided not to put a cold air intake kit with the large filter on my car - it might have something to do with the fact that you can get one for an LFX yet! What I came up with in my research is that the 6.2 engines use the same air box and air filter as the 3.6s! If GM thinks that same airbox can flow enough for a 6.2 engine, I’m going to be okay with the K&N drop-in filter. Granted the 6.2s are supercharged, but the CFM is there regardless. Because K&N filters typically flow twice what paper filters do, this is a good place to start, your part number is 33 – 2411. You can compare the filters in the picture below.

http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/XE-Ryder/CA%20Mod/XE-CA-Filters_zps89eb069b.jpg

You’re going to need to remove the front trim panel along the top of the radiator. Unscrew and remove the pushpins, gently remove the hood sealing gasket and lift the trim panel out and set it aside somewhere safe. Lift up the trim panel that attaches to the airbox slightly, and reach your hand behind the strut tower brace to gently slip the panel rearward without breaking the clip!

You will need 8mm and 10 mm sockets to loosen the air boot, and remove the one bolt in the driver strut tower holding the airbox. Your MAF sensor plug has a red locking clip, carefully slide it towards the rear of the car, and then press your finger right in the center of it to unlock the plug, while gently wiggling it towards the rear of the car. Take your time and be careful with this, after you’ve done it once it’s pretty simple.

In the following picture I’m trying to show you part of a thin plastic panel that was blocking the airbox from receiving fresh air from the grill. Once you look at here with a flashlight, it’s pretty easy to see that removing some of this will allow air a direct path into your airbox. These pictures show you what it looks like after you remove a piece about the size I’ve shown. You can clearly see the grill as you look from the back; this is what the airbox will see as you go down the road.

http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/XE-Ryder/CA%20Mod/XE-CA-Removed_zps5b11ce48.jpg

To ensure that the pressurized air coming into the grill will be all the airbox breathes, and that we don’t lose cooling efficiency by air leaking around the side of our opening, we’re going to use some closed cell, heat resistant foam, and make a gasket for the airhorn. This piece will be about 5 ” square, and you want to put your airhorn through the lower portion of it. It can be a little tricky to get in place once it’s installed, I sprayed some silicone spray around the edges of the fender and used along Phillips screwdriver to help stuff it in place. In the picture below you can see how it looked before I installed it, and if you look through my grill, you can clearly see the black foam sealing the airhorn to the grille, and the airhorn opening looking at the grill.

http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/XE-Ryder/CA%20Mod/XE-CA-Finish_zps825abb07.jpg

How much power is this modification really worth? On a hot day parked in traffic, possibly nothing. But most of the time, the outside air that first meets the front of your car, will be going into your engine. Between the added flow of the K&N filter, a potentially cooler intake charge, and a little help from the front clip at speed I think it’s certainly worth the time. I can tell you that after doing this, axle back exhaust system, polishing the throttle body and letting the car relearn it, it was a noticeable difference on my car. For every 10 you can lower the temperature of your intake air, you should realize a 1% gain in power. If you can drop 20, that’s worth more than 6 hp.

If you’re curious about what might happen in inclement weather, the intake air pulls up through the air filter, and there are 2 drain holes drilled in the bottom of the airbox. If you really went puddle splashing, I think you’d be fine. And if that wasn’t good enough, there’s another catch basin with a drainhole right behind the throttle body, on the intake manifold. So there it is, do what you will!

SC2150
01-27-13, 11:45 AM
I ported but not polished my throttle body. Dosent make too much of a difference. Id have to say throttle responses has increased slighty tho. Yea shes peppy

Watch this video to get an idea of the CNC pattern ported TB. Hand porting can never equal or duplicate the science behind the VMax:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FDbVy4Hum1c

X E Ryder
01-27-13, 02:16 PM
Watch this video to get an idea of the CNC pattern ported TB. Hand porting can never equal or duplicate the science behind the VMax:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FDbVy4Hum1c

And Hand Porting can never equal or duplicate the Price behind the VMax either! :)

For the minimal gains a NA Engine gets from this mod, I don't mind doing it.
If I was porting heads? I would hand them over to a flowbench tech for sure!

X E Ryder
01-27-13, 11:50 PM
Installing an Air / Oil Separator on the LFX Engine

When I had 900 miles on my new CTS Coupe 3.6, I removed my PCV line and in tapping the intake fitting on my hand, I dispensed more than a drop of oil. That was reason enough for me to decide that this motor could benefit from an air / oil separator, or catch can as they are commonly called. After pulling my throttle body off, and carefully dredging a rag around up inside the intake in many different directions, I did not manage to find any puddles of oil, but there is an oily residue on the passages as you can sort of see in the picture below.

http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/XE-Ryder/SP%20Mod/XE-SP-Intake_zpseec766b6.jpg

This post covers installing a separator on the LFX engine. The 3.6 PCV line is the same size used on the CTS V (3/8), so I decided to go with the Moroso #85603 kit because it was in stock and shipped the same day. The separator is anodized black, but you can get natural finish if you go with #85602.

http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/XE-Ryder/SP%20Mod/XE-SP-Label_zps47c12c73.jpg

For your install, you want to remove the engine cover, and the passenger side trim cover. Next, remove the factory PCV line, which has a quarter turn fitting on the intake manifold, and a ridiculous plastic latch on the valve cover. This piece would like to break, and I dont suppose engine heat makes the plastic anymore cooperative. Ive shown a close-up of the fitting below, you can see the plastic latch that locks it onto the valve cover. If it breaks, or if you break it while removing the line, dont worry about it because you are not going to reuse it. Once you have the valve cover fitting off, you can gently bring the line forward, turning the intake fitting of the PCV line turn counterclockwise in the intake, then lift it up and remove it.

http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/XE-Ryder/SP%20Mod/XE-SP-Connector_zpsd67731af.jpg

The CTS V separator kit was designed to mount to the filler neck of the 6.2 engine. The stainless steel bracket that is included, handily mounts to the passenger side strut tower brace. Youll need to drill two 1/4" holes here, don't get excited about the prospect of drilling this cast bracket, you may note theres already a hole drilled in the driver side unused. Below Ive shown some measurements of how far down and how far to the side I mounted my bracket for your reference. For clarity I did not start the measurements on zero. To mount my bracket I used stainless x 1 socket head screws.

http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/XE-Ryder/SP%20Mod/XE-SP-Measure_zpsd06653fb.jpg

Below Ive shown where I cut off my PCV line, and the offset piece and fitting that attaches to the valve cover is not reused. Well attach our hose directly to the fitting on the valve cover, and use one of the small hose clamps to secure it. Use the other hose clamp in the kit to secure the longer hose on the cutoff PCV line.

http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/XE-Ryder/SP%20Mod/XE-SP-Cutline_zps9ec60ff2.jpg

Spend little time to route the hoses cleanly, and then reassemble everything and youre done. Ive driven about 800 miles since my install, and Ive got less than a teaspoon in my separator. But the real proof is when I pulled the line from the intake, I no longer had any oil dripping out of the PCV line. That is after all, the point isnt it?

http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/XE-Ryder/SP%20Mod/XE-SP-Installed_zps3824ea4b.jpg

This is a great spot to install the separator, it is rock solid, and extremely easy to unscrew and check or empty as needed. You barely even see it from the front of the engine.

X E Ryder
06-10-13, 11:25 PM
Magnaflow offers the 15216 Exhaust for 2012 CTS Coupe

Another option for the LFX Coupe owner, the Magnaflow 15216 exhaust

115449

And you can find more info here...

http://www.magnaflow.com/02product/shopexd.asp?zone=all&id=6

Does anyone have this installed?

SC2150
06-12-13, 07:21 PM
Installing an Air / Oil Separator on the LFX Engine

When I had 900 miles on my new CTS Coupe 3.6, I removed my PCV line and in tapping the intake fitting on my hand, I dispensed more than a drop of oil. That was reason enough for me to decide that this motor could benefit from an air / oil separator, or “catch can” as they are commonly called. After pulling my throttle body off, and carefully dredging a rag around up inside the intake in many different directions, I did not manage to find any puddles of oil, but there is an oily residue on the passages as you can sort of see in the picture below.

http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/XE-Ryder/SP%20Mod/XE-SP-Intake_zpseec766b6.jpg

This post covers installing a separator on the LFX engine. The 3.6 PCV line is the same size used on the CTS V (3/8”), so I decided to go with the Moroso #85603 kit because it was in stock and shipped the same day. The separator is anodized black, but you can get natural finish if you go with #85602.

http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/XE-Ryder/SP%20Mod/XE-SP-Label_zps47c12c73.jpg

For your install, you want to remove the engine cover, and the passenger side trim cover. Next, remove the factory PCV line, which has a quarter turn fitting on the intake manifold, and a ridiculous plastic latch on the valve cover. This piece would like to break, and I don’t suppose engine heat makes the plastic anymore cooperative. I’ve shown a close-up of the fitting below, you can see the plastic latch that locks it onto the valve cover. If it breaks, or if you break it while removing the line, don’t worry about it because you are not going to reuse it. Once you have the valve cover fitting off, you can gently bring the line forward, turning the intake fitting of the PCV line turn counterclockwise in the intake, then lift it up and remove it.

http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/XE-Ryder/SP%20Mod/XE-SP-Connector_zpsd67731af.jpg

The CTS V separator kit was designed to mount to the filler neck of the 6.2 engine. The stainless steel bracket that is included, handily mounts to the passenger side strut tower brace. You’ll need to drill two 1/4" holes here, don't get excited about the prospect of drilling this cast bracket, you may note there’s already a hole drilled in the driver side unused. Below I’ve shown some measurements of how far down and how far to the side I mounted my bracket for your reference. For clarity I did not start the measurements on zero. To mount my bracket I used stainless ” x 1” socket head screws.

http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/XE-Ryder/SP%20Mod/XE-SP-Measure_zpsd06653fb.jpg

Below I’ve shown where I cut off my PCV line, and the offset piece and fitting that attaches to the valve cover is not reused. We’ll attach our hose directly to the fitting on the valve cover, and use one of the small hose clamps to secure it. Use the other hose clamp in the kit to secure the longer hose on the cutoff PCV line.

http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/XE-Ryder/SP%20Mod/XE-SP-Cutline_zps9ec60ff2.jpg

Spend little time to route the hoses cleanly, and then reassemble everything and you’re done. I’ve driven about 800 miles since my install, and I’ve got less than a teaspoon in my separator. But the real proof is when I pulled the line from the intake, I no longer had any oil dripping out of the PCV line. That is after all, the point isn’t it?

http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/XE-Ryder/SP%20Mod/XE-SP-Installed_zps3824ea4b.jpg

This is a great spot to install the separator, it is rock solid, and extremely easy to unscrew and check or empty as needed. You barely even see it from the front of the engine.

Great pics and tutorial! You do know though that the oil can you have lets app 30% plus of the oil to pass right through though due to the internal design.

Try this to see for yourself. For app $10 get a clear glass inline fuel filter and install it between the outlet and the IM and in 100 miles or less it will be full of the oil passing through that style can.

Still much better than no can.

:thumbsup:

X E Ryder
06-13-13, 12:23 PM
Great pics and tutorial! You do know though that the oil can you have lets app 30% plus of the oil to pass right through though due to the internal design.

Try this to see for yourself. For app $10 get a clear glass inline fuel filter and install it between the outlet and the IM and in 100 miles or less it will be full of the oil passing through that style can.

Still much better than no can.

:thumbsup:

We put the cheap clear filter after your can and it dirtied up just like any other, and neither can "filled" it with oil in approximately 100 miles.

I don't care for the plastic fittings on your can which get loose and fail after a year of high underhood temperatures, and you cannot open up, service or clean the substrate in your can. Finally, we both know you have to say the can you are pushing is "30% plus" better; you could never endorse another can over the one you are selling! That won't fill your wallet.

The Moroso always works like it is brand new because it is so easy to service and all the metal is unaffected by high underhood temps. I don't have any idea what is going on inside your can but I can tell you it becomes restrictive over time in service.

SC2150
06-13-13, 03:41 PM
We put the cheap clear filter after your can and it dirtied up just like any other, and neither can "filled" it with oil in approximately 100 miles.

I don't care for the plastic fittings on your can which get loose and fail after a year of high underhood temperatures, and you cannot open up, service or clean the substrate in your can. Finally, we both know you have to say the can you are pushing is "30% plus" better; you could never endorse another can over the one you are selling! That won't fill your wallet.

The Moroso always works like it is brand new because it is so easy to service and all the metal is unaffected by high underhood temps. I don't have any idea what is going on inside your can but I can tell you it becomes restrictive over time in service.


A complete lie as usual.....read this thread. I endorse the AMW, the ELite engineering, the Saiku Micchi, etc. All that have tested to work well.

Look at the pictures and read the descriptions and test results......The truth seems to come hard for some.....and you are a perfect example. You can see the internal workings of the RX can as well but don't change, keep that can and let the oil in.

http://www.camaro5.com/forums/showthread.php?t=265217&page=3

----------

This is the usual response on those that have gone to the RX can, he is a member here:

Hey Tracy, Just wanted to thank you, and everyone at RevXtreme. I bought a catch can from you, for my 2005 CTS. Well since installing it i'm not consuming any oil anymore. I've had a close eye on the oil level since i have installed it and it hasn't used a drop. I don't know how or what that catch can has done to prevent the oil consumption. (I've read your tech tips article and understand the concept of how a catch can work.) I guess i am just baffeled that it something so simple like that could work.



Anyway just wanted to thank you. I was at my last wits end with this car and was about to put it back on the market, after the dealer replaced two motors under warrenty.



I'll be purchasing another catch can from you in the future. I have a 2000 Camaro SS that is getting a turbo as we speak, as a fun project street car.



But thanks again. It was definetly worth the wait.



Gabe Moulden

X E Ryder
06-14-13, 10:45 AM
Your response was predictable, and unprofessional. That was the main reason I went looking for another product. When owners (on several different forums) post a product they have bought, you oftentimes jump up and down with a childish response. The first being "mines better", and the follow up to any criticism (constructive or otherwise) you insult your potential customer base. You just called me a liar, not cool; certainly not someone I would consider doing business with. The link You provided above chronicles another unprofessional exchange between you and the automotive community.

It is a fact that No catch can, will stop 100% of the vapors, your can does not disassemble, it does have plastic top fittings, and the folks at Moroso are more professional.

You have quoted the letter which indicates that after installing your can: "I've had a close eye on the oil level since i have installed it and it hasn't used a drop." While another customer stated: "I did an oil change today and drained my catch can at the same time. And WOW it had like 100ml of foamy disgusting oil."

So you want the reader to think they can catch All the oil vapors in your can, yet the oil level never moves on the dipstick? If so, the only thing filling your can is BS. Uh-Oh, look who painted themselves into a corner... Again.

If you had any professional courtesy at all, your reply to my post would've been something like "So you are saying if we had an all metal servicable design you would buy it?" That would've done the trick and made a sale as well as engaging conversation. Not a pissing contest. Your product is six or a half dozen in my opinion, but I'd pay thrice as much for a can, half as effective, just to avoid supporting someone who repeatedly patronizes people on forums who disagree with you.

SC2150
06-14-13, 02:38 PM
So, you did not look at the cutaways of the cans and the explanations (including the RX)? You can be as ignorant as you like, but the reason for installing a can is to stop all or nearly all the oil ingestion.....and you ignore the simple test to see. The Moroso is app 1/3th the internal volumne it needs to be for the flow through to slow enough for the droplets to not be sucked into the side you use as an outlet (there is no designated outlet or inlet) so you have less than 1/4" separating the two sides....and there is media against each side so the outlet side is no different than putting a wet washcloth up to your mouth and sucking...what happens? You suck water out. Same thing happens with your can:

http://i262.photobucket.com/albums/ii115/RevXtreme1/Chakitadiffcatchcans017.jpg
http://i262.photobucket.com/albums/ii115/RevXtreme1/Chakitadiffcatchcans016.jpg

The RX can has 14" between the inlet and outlet and is app 1 qt capacity so the speed of the flow through can slow enough for the droplets to not be pulled along with the flow (take a straw, spill some water in a saucer, and suck...all is pulled up. Do the same now with a 1/2 hose and no water is pulled up...same principal for those that don't understand the physic's of flow dynamics. Or a simple dentist suction does the same).

The RX can also never mixes the separated/cleaned crankcase vapors with the incoming dirty ones as your can does (simple, look at the can you have apart...or the pictures I show here to follow the logic). Yours has a central chamber that the vapors travel into and out of.

http://i262.photobucket.com/albums/ii115/RevXtreme1/RXcantakeapart003_zpsc1eb1eb7.jpg

The Saiku Micchi also traps nearly all the oil (app 40% plus more than your can) as well as the AMW or Elite Engineering.

But since you don't seem to care about function...make sure you stay with what you have.....and the difference in fuction between cans is huge as you could see in the other thread of all the pictures

----------

And the plastic flow controlling checkvalves are high heat poly and they are only on the lowest priced base unit:
http://i262.photobucket.com/albums/ii115/RevXtreme1/cancolors003_zps342d55aa.jpg

For a bit extra, then use nice AN fittings and braided lines:

http://i262.photobucket.com/albums/ii115/RevXtreme1/IOMwithANfittings.jpg

X E Ryder
06-15-13, 12:03 AM
Now you're offering me all the ignorance I'd like? Nice. Yes a Moroso is smaller, but that is not a picture of the can I have or it's internals; Moroso cans do not have integrated brackets. and with the substrate inside, and the two 90o turns in and out, and a 180o gas path inside (you removed the plate and the can is pictured upside down) I have had little difference in the accumulation rate of "catched" oil than one of your customers - this is arguably hard for anyone to prove. We did pull the intake side hoses and both have a slight sheen to them. I might have bought yours if you were a professional.

monogram124
06-16-13, 03:30 PM
I'm glad you guys have seemed to work this out...

I did want to say that I have found Tracy to be nothing but professional. He took the time to answer all my questions personally & explained a lot. He doesn't try to oversell or push you into buying anything. Originally I asked him about a dual valve catchcan & an ice-o-lator for my '12 CTS. He told me the cheaper single valve was what I needed & the ice-o-lator was unnecessary due to my plastic manifold cover. He could've just as easily sold me the more expensive stuff & kept his mouth shut but he didn't. I appreciate guys like Tracy on this forum helping out. & no I'm not a paid spokesperson, just a satisfied customer.
Keep up the great work Tracy!

cawengr
06-17-13, 08:22 PM
SC2150,First, I am totally sold on the catch can and am contemplating buying one. On your Camaro link you state: (We test all we can, and then cut them apart. Go back a few pages and see the results in detail with pictures.

The ones (and again, test for yourself)
that are tops are in this order:

RX catches all visable oil
Saiku Micchi Catches 90-95%
AMW & Elite (tied) catch 90-95% on NA applications.

Any of these are great cans we endorse (even though compete directly against us, they are great) Can you let us know the method you use to get the numbers you are quoting, RX - All, Saiku Michi - 90-95%, AMW & Elite 90-95%. What is the test method ? How are the percentages calculated ?

X E Ryder
06-18-13, 04:09 PM
I'm glad you guys have seemed to work this out...

I did want to say that I have found Tracy to be nothing but professional. He took the time to answer all my questions personally & explained a lot. He doesn't try to oversell or push you into buying anything. Originally I asked him about a dual valve catchcan & an ice-o-lator for my '12 CTS. He told me the cheaper single valve was what I needed & the ice-o-lator was unnecessary due to my plastic manifold cover. He could've just as easily sold me the more expensive stuff & kept his mouth shut but he didn't. I appreciate guys like Tracy on this forum helping out. & no I'm not a paid spokesperson, just a satisfied customer.
Keep up the great work Tracy!

Not exactly - still no effort to post like a professional vendor. Bear in mind the intake spacer doesn't fit an LFX engine, so that point is moot. Based on the complaints posted on this forum for part delivery times, that can may have been all that was on hand.


SC2150,...
(paraphrased)
......Can you let us know the method you use to get the numbers you are quoting, RX - All, Saiku Michi - 90-95%, AMW & Elite 90-95%. What is the test method ? How are the percentages calculated ?

Without testing performed by an independent body, with no vested sales interest, the results are meaningless. "RX - All"? The best part is that the supposed results indicate a +/- 5% variance in all cases Except for the RX product, which somehow scores 100% with a 0% variance. The vendor tests everyone's product and claims their own product scores perfectly with zero variance? Hello!

X E Ryder
12-07-13, 10:23 AM
IPF Tuning - PowerTune - Up to 25HP from original engineers!

Just a heads up that LFX and most others actually, can get a fantastic tune for your motor which will unleash up to another 25HP and only requires running 91 octane fuel. The short version is, in order for your motor to run 87 octane safely, certain fuel and ignition parameters cannot be set as aggressively. If you only run 91 octane fuel, these curves can be set to take advantage of this. IPF Tuning was founded as an offshoot of a German company which wrote the original DI programs. Unlike a Trifecta tune (which software in capable hands can yield good results), the IPF Tuning PowerTuneg accesses the original fuel and ignition tables, instead of piggybacking on top them. It is completely reversible, and yields instant noticeable, Measurable results.

The price is around $499 for the complete setup, including a tune from the database best matching your car.

http://www.ipf-tuning.com/powertune/

Give them a call - They are happy to answer any questions - I was quite impressed!

166674

KLX
12-07-13, 04:59 PM
I got word that they are still testing to get the tune working on the 2013 CTS coupe, I got one for my vehicle and it didn't work at all.

SC2150
12-08-13, 03:08 PM
I see good results from both companies tunes as reported by the customers and the dyno graphs........they fight non-stop, and neither are perfect, but for what is available the gains are worth it IMHO (from either).

viper3881
01-18-14, 06:34 PM
@XERyder I see you say in one of your post that someone could mod the Corsa CTS V Coupe exhaust to fight on a non-cts v coupe? Do you know what they do? It seems like you could use the whole setup and just cut the tips off?

X E Ryder
01-19-14, 12:02 PM
@XERyder I see you say in one of your post that someone could mod the Corsa CTS V Coupe exhaust to fight on a non-cts v coupe? Do you know what they do? It seems like you could use the whole setup and just cut the tips off?

Yes it will fit on a coupe, but bear in mind it would be more about the sound than performance, as it is not tuned and dyno tested for a 3.6. This also applies to the sedan, even with single exhaust which can be cut at the resonator (there is a picture series online of how it's done). Several people have put CTS-V stock exhausts on their CTS' but the sound and performance increase were subtle. With the larger head pipes on a stock engine you could lose some performance. In either case, you would require the services of a muffler shop - it's not a bolt-on mod.

I'm still very pleased with my Borla axle-back system - it's quiet going down the road, and sounds off when you stand on it.

EVH5150
01-24-14, 04:48 AM
I love the sound of your coupe with the Borla axle back, in fact I will say its by far the best sounding CTS 3.6 I've ever heard! A while ago I had a listen to your video and that is the exact sound I want from my coupe. My coupe has the manual trans so it should sound amazing as I row the gears, lol.
Yes it will fit on a coupe, but bear in mind it would be more about the sound than performance, as it is not tuned and dyno tested for a 3.6. This also applies to the sedan, even with single exhaust which can be cut at the resonator (there is a picture series online of how it's done). Several people have put CTS-V stock exhausts on their CTS' but the sound and performance increase were subtle. With the larger head pipes on a stock engine you could lose some performance. In either case, you would require the services of a muffler shop - it's not a bolt-on mod.

I'm still very pleased with my Borla axle-back system - it's quiet going down the road, and sounds off when you stand on it.

X E Ryder
01-25-14, 11:59 AM
I love the sound of your coupe with the Borla axle back, in fact I will say its by far the best sounding CTS 3.6 I've ever heard! A while ago I had a listen to your video and that is the exact sound I want from my coupe. My coupe has the manual trans so it should sound amazing as I row the gears, lol.

Hey thanks for the kind words - I really am happy with it. In the posts above you can see how to do my "Chilly Air" intake mod and port your own throttle body as well, then finish off with a drop in K&N and tune from IPF (requires running 91 octane). That all makes a nice bump in performance.

Ahhhh. "To Stick, or Not To Stick, That was the question... " (lol) ...when I bought my car as well. That has to be fun! :cool2: I'm pretty big and have size 13 shoes so, when I tried to get both my sneakers down there with three pedals is was a little crowded. Which is actually funny because my commuter car is a Honda Del Sol and I can Heel and Toe that thing like a Boss! It just has more room down there.

I have to admit that I don't regret the auto trans (with touring because of the paddle shift buttons, though I could see if you don't have pretty large hands they might be tricky to get at), as it also RPM matches the shifts which is fantastic for grabbing gears in a hard corner. I live pretty close to this road, a section of Hwy 29 which is about 9 miles of absolute insanity and I drift around some of the corners (thankfully I have not seen a cop on that road driving like that... yet). Even as a veteran of such road courses as Laguna Seca, I doubt I could drive this road as fast if my Cadi had the third pedal, but that theory is as yet untested.

Here is most of that road but I couldn't get all the fun parts into one frame...
http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/XE-Ryder/Misc%20Pics/Hwy29-Fun_zpsb0eb8de6.jpg (http://s1235.photobucket.com/user/XE-Ryder/media/Misc%20Pics/Hwy29-Fun_zpsb0eb8de6.jpg.html)

In the end I may still do a custom turbo job to it, but we still drive ours all over the western states. Tearing into the motor seems a little dumb when 95% of the time I don't need any more power and we still have a warranty.

EVH5150
01-28-14, 05:43 PM
You're welcome.

You have great information on mods etc, and I wish we had a freeway like that, wow!

I feel our coupe's have plenty of power and sometimes I'm surprised so many people post threads about improving performance. I will admit sometimes an auto would be nice when I am feeling lazy, and the rev match is awesome.
Hey thanks for the kind words - I really am happy with it. In the posts above you can see how to do my "Chilly Air" intake mod and port your own throttle body as well, then finish off with a drop in K&N and tune from IPF (requires running 91 octane). That all makes a nice bump in performance.

Ahhhh. "To Stick, or Not To Stick, That was the question... " (lol) ...when I bought my car as well. That has to be fun! :cool2: I'm pretty big and have size 13 shoes so, when I tried to get both my sneakers down there with three pedals is was a little crowded. Which is actually funny because my commuter car is a Honda Del Sol and I can Heel and Toe that thing like a Boss! It just has more room down there.

I have to admit that I don't regret the auto trans (with touring because of the paddle shift buttons, though I could see if you don't have pretty large hands they might be tricky to get at), as it also RPM matches the shifts which is fantastic for grabbing gears in a hard corner. I live pretty close to this road, a section of Hwy 29 which is about 9 miles of absolute insanity and I drift around some of the corners (thankfully I have not seen a cop on that road driving like that... yet). Even as a veteran of such road courses as Laguna Seca, I doubt I could drive this road as fast if my Cadi had the third pedal, but that theory is as yet untested.

Here is most of that road but I couldn't get all the fun parts into one frame...
http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/XE-Ryder/Misc%20Pics/Hwy29-Fun_zpsb0eb8de6.jpg (http://s1235.photobucket.com/user/XE-Ryder/media/Misc%20Pics/Hwy29-Fun_zpsb0eb8de6.jpg.html)

In the end I may still do a custom turbo job to it, but we still drive ours all over the western states. Tearing into the motor seems a little dumb when 95% of the time I don't need any more power and we still have a warranty.

Sailirish7
02-04-14, 12:45 PM
Videos show private now FYI...

EVH5150
02-04-14, 05:25 PM
Search it on you tube, I'm pretty sure it's there.

X E Ryder
02-09-14, 10:42 AM
Videos show private now FYI...


Search it on you tube, I'm pretty sure it's there.

Thank you for the heads up - should be fixed now.

I absolutely detest what Poogle has done to U Toob - just like when LieSpace got ruined.

Chrishiznit33
05-25-14, 10:47 PM
after picking up my 2012 coupe, I'm really surprised at how theres nothing performance wise for us... has anyone just swapped the stock mufflers and done an axelback on they're lfx? idk if i wanna spend 1k plus on a full system.. just want a nice sound..

jamiejam1
05-27-14, 02:17 PM
The Borla 11824 IS an axle back....

----------

OK so lets just get a complete List here: theres the
throttle body
Borla or magna flow
Catch can
a couple of different tunes for the motor and Transmission from what Ive Read.
Air Raid and K&N CAI and RAM Air Intake..

What else?

arw1510
05-27-14, 06:52 PM
The Borla 11824 IS an axle back....

----------

OK so lets just get a complete List here: theres the
throttle body
Borla or magna flow
Catch can
a couple of different tunes for the motor and Transmission from what Ive Read.
Air Raid and K&N CAI and RAM Air Intake..

What else?

The cai you list are not applicable. This is for lfx engines which they as of yet do not support

jamiejam1
05-28-14, 10:57 AM
Interesting thing I noticed Last night.. I was putting on my Eibach Kit. and since I was looking at the Borla Exhaust. I wanted to take a peek to see how Involved it was going to be to drop the exhaust.. to my surprise, There is not a single Flange on the exhaust, the entire thing is one welded unit, all the way up to the damn exhaust manifold! Cats pre muffler everything is welded!!! :( WTH?????? BTW its a 2014 Performance coupe...

tinman
05-28-14, 11:40 AM
Drive it up here. We can take care of that for you. Bring your girlfriend.

jamiejam1
05-28-14, 12:00 PM
Drive it up here. We can take care of that for you. Bring your girlfriend.

What Girlfriend? LOL I Have a CTS! :nuffsaid:

tinman
05-28-14, 12:04 PM
The deal's off! :thehand:

jamiejam1
05-28-14, 12:09 PM
The deal's off! :thehand:

I have a sister if you're interested! LOL!!!

SC2150
05-29-14, 01:18 PM
Sorry I missed this, but here is an example of the testing. After we test we also ask for others to test independently:

The UPR tested here is the same as the Moroso, Billet Tech, Billet tech, billet prototypes, etc.

Default UPR vs RX Catch Can Effectiveness Test
I’ve had a UPR catch can on my 5.0 since last summer. It catches a lot, especially in the cold months. But I’ll get right to my test. I added an RX can inline after my UPR can to see if the UPR was missing anything. And if it was allowing some to pass through, was it enough for the RX to catch anything? I don’t drive a lot of miles regularly since my F150 is not a daily driver, so my results will take some time. This thread is to document how I set it up and what I catch over time.
I installed the RX can just as the directions explained, but I routed the hoses differently. I left my UPR can right where it’s been for months, but rerouted one hose. I left the hose from the passenger side of the engine to the inlet of the UPR can. Then a new hose from UPR can outlet, routed to the inlet of the RX can. The RX outlet hose goes back to the engine. The PCV exhaust now flows from the engine, through the UPR, then through the RX, and finally back up to the engine intake.
Before installing everything for the test, I cleaned the UPR can thoroughly. The bottom of the can (inside) was covered with a thin layer of stiff sludge that I could only clean out using gas. I’m glad that was caught, along with the ounces of oil, water, etc, over the months I’ve been emptying it. But I was surprised at the outlet hose from the UPR can. It was wet with oil. Obviously some was getting through the can and back to my intake. I’ve never let the can get close to half full before emptying it. Nearly every time I’ve emptied it, there was 1/4“ or less in the bottom. I’m noting this in case someone thinks I left the UPR get overfilled and it flowed through. Nevertheless, I started this test after cleaning everything for a fresh start.
I plan to leave this setup on for a thousand miles or so, and report my findings from each can.
1st picture: UPR can as it was originally installed.
2nd: CleanUPR can.
3rd: RX can installed. The hose in the top center of the can is the inlet. The outlet hose on the right has a check valve.
4th: Engine outlet to UPR inlet on left of can. UPR outlet on right side of can routed around (smaller hose) to the RX inlet. You can also see the other smaller hose coming back up from the RX can and ending at the intake on the engine.


Attached Thumbnails
UPR vs RX Catch Can Effectiveness Test-p1010484c.jpg UPR vs RX Catch Can Effectiveness Test-p1010485c.jpg UPR vs RX Catch Can Effectiveness Test-p1010487c.jpg UPR vs RX Catch Can Effectiveness Test-p1010488c.jpg

And the results:


1000 Miles of Testing Results

- The Weather has been warmer lately. So the test began with sub freezing temperatures, and gradually increased through the 70's and topped off in the mid 80's yesterday. I couldn't have asked for a better range of temperatures for this test.

- What they caught was astounding to me. UPR was first in line, with the RX after it to catch anything the UPR might miss.
The UPR stayed on track with what it has been accumulating for many months. Each time I emptied them, it had about the same amount. It's contents were mostly oil which smelled like used oil. It caught 17cc total which is just under 3 1/2 tsp.
The RX had more than the UPR each time I emptied them. It's contents were an oil/fuel/water type mix that had a much stronger odor. Not a fuel smell, but a sharper chemical smell compared to the odor of used oil. It caught a total of 67cc which is just over 13 1/2 tsp.

- Final totals:
UPR - 17cc
RX - 67cc

Quote:
Originally Posted by nix150 View Post
So, if I'm understanding you right...it appears that the UPR had significant blow-by to which the RX can then caught, correct?
The RX can caught 4 times the amount the UPR can caught, after the UPR can removed what it could. I said from the beginning I would be surprised if the RX can could pull 10% of what the UPR caught, since it was second in line. If someone told me it would catch an equal amount I would have said BS. For it to catch 4 times what the UPR can caught is unreal


So, this testing can be done by anyone, and the results will surprise most that think they have an effective can that is really only catching a fraction of what is being ingested.

And to UPR's credit, they added to revisions, an extension that increases the capacity, and a new diffusser. So they have dramatically improved upon their design. The test of the newest UPR version is taking place now.

:thumbsup: