: Special Christmases remembered



orconn
11-29-12, 02:48 PM
Over the years, Christmases seem to blend one with the other, but for each of us I'll bet there have been "special" Christmases which standout in our memories as being as being different from all the other holidays gone by. Any of these you'd care to share?

truckinman
11-29-12, 03:40 PM
Every Christmas that I can remember has been a special one to me. It's always memorable getting together with loved ones for good stories, great food, and simply amazing traditions.

I'm thinking this Christmas, however, is going to be one of the more special ones. It'll be Chrissy's and my first in a home that weve acquired together. So I can't wait to start new traditions together, as the start of our family is currently taking place. And one day we will have our kids to joyfully include in added traditions that we will continue to accrue every holiday season together. And this Christmas is the foundation to which that will all flourish from, which is what makes me sure, THIS Christmas will be the most memorable.

We've told each other not to buy gifts bc we've gotta wedding we are paying for. And bc we just sorta had a bit of a shopping spree at best buy last weekend. Lol. New 40 inch tv for bedroom. New Samsung surround sound for living room, and a new 200 dollar picture printer. Lol. But I'm sure she might find some sorta nice piece of jewelry under the tree come Christmas morning anyway. Lol.

But I am going to make us a nice big Christmas breakfast consisting of: sausage, eggs, home made waffles, hash browns, and of course freshly baked cinnamon rolls! Going to be one amazing christmas!

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Great topic by the way Orconn! Nothing better than getting into the christmas spirit!

Oh, and one tradition we've already started from last year is, on Christmas eve, we drive thru this amazing drive thru Christmas light show, sipping on some egg nog, non alcoholic of course (at least until we get back home, then it gets mixed with Southern Comfort).

Submariner409
11-29-12, 04:21 PM
They're all special - even the 3 that I spent 400 feet down in the North Atlantic during missile submarine deterrent patrols. The Crew's Mess was always decorated to the hilt - complete with tree made from shredded green garbage bags - and every man in the diverse crew of 155 celebrated "Christmas" in his own way.

vincentm
11-29-12, 05:19 PM
Not a single one, my childhood xmases consisted of my mom being drunk as hell, my brother smoking and selling crank out house, and before my parents split they consisted of dad fighting with my drunk mom.

One year she attempted suicide and i had to get the knife from her, we mostly had our toys stolen from the local Thrifty's drug store.

Now that im a parent i enjoy it soley for my sons, thats it. Other than them i could give a hoot about it

rodnok01
11-29-12, 09:51 PM
Not a single one, my childhood xmases cinsisted of my mom being drunk as hell, my brother smoking and selling crank out house, and before my parents split they consisted of him fighting with my drunk mom.

One year she attempted suicide and i had to get the knife from her, we mostly had our toys stolen from the local Thrifty's drug store.

Now that im a parent i enjoy it soley for my sons, thats it. Other than them i could give a shit about it

Wow, sorry to hear that, def not what the time of the year is about. Glad you can enjoy for your sons and have created good memories for them.
And I would like to wish you a Merry Christmas and hope you can enjoy the holidays for what they are now and not what has happened in the past.

donwon
11-30-12, 12:55 PM
The best Christmas for me was in 1970. We were married in 67, and in 69 we moved to Ga. for a new job.
I got layed off in June of 70, and my wife was pregnant. I couldn't find a job that paid anywhere near what I had been makeing and was working 2 jobs and we were just scrapeing by.
At 7 months my wife had some complitations and the Doc. told us not to travel more than 100 miles from ths hospital.
She told me not to buy her any present that year so I didn't.
On the morning of Dec 20 she said it was time to go so we went.
When I let her out and got her into the emergency room and the nurses got her, I had to go move the car.
When I got back inside the Doc was already looking for me. We had a baby girl, normal and healthy.
We got to carry her home on the 23 rd and it was just the 3 of us all by ourselves.
Somehow my wife had got me a sweater and gave it to me on Christmas Eve and I had no guift for her.
She didn't mind and has never mentioned it or brought it up.
For me that was the happiest Christmas I have had, and the one I still remember.

GreaseMonkey
11-30-12, 01:30 PM
I have always loved Christmas (even though I am not religious whatsoever), but after college they started to not feel as special. Don't get me wrong, I still deck out the house and listen to Christmas music and all of that good stuff.

The time with family just isn't the same as when I was a kid, or coming home for Christmas break from college. I really look forward to my wife and I having kids soon, as they will bring the magic back for Christmas.

dkozloski
11-30-12, 03:58 PM
One Christmas when I was in the Navy I was not going to be able to travel home to Alaska so I visited my Dads Polish family in Illinois. Those people know how to have a good time. If you visit their home and you are able to leave under your own power they consider themselves failures as hosts. One uncle was an important city official so I traveled from party to party in a police squad car to avoid DUIs.

A good time was had by all.

thebigjimsho
11-30-12, 07:19 PM
I'll probably be working. Already keeping tabs on the McDs and DDs that will be open...

ben.gators
11-30-12, 08:29 PM
One Christmas when I was in the Navy I was not going to be able to travel home to Alaska so I visited my Dads Polish family in Illinois. Those people know how to have a good time. If you visit their home and you are able to leave under your own power they consider themselves failures as hosts. One uncle was an important city official so I traveled from party to party in a police squad car to avoid DUIs.

A good time was had by all.

LOL.... You and Orconn are the most colorful members of this forum! The story of the dead frozen Russian in your backyard was one of the most hilarious things that I ever have read....:D

CadillacLuke24
12-01-12, 12:53 AM
One Christmas when I was in the Navy I was not going to be able to travel home to Alaska so I visited my Dads Polish family in Illinois. Those people know how to have a good time. If you visit their home and you are able to leave under your own power they consider themselves failures as hosts. One uncle was an important city official so I traveled from party to party in a police squad car to avoid DUIs.

A good time was had by all.

:histeric:

I bet you had some WILD parties!!!

talismandave
12-01-12, 01:31 AM
One Christmas when I was in the Navy I was not going to be able to travel home to Alaska so I visited my Dads Polish family in Illinois. Those people know how to have a good time. If you visit their home and you are able to leave under your own power they consider themselves failures as hosts. One uncle was an important city official so I traveled from party to party in a police squad car to avoid DUIs.

A good time was had by all.

Thank's Koz,

Read this one to my mom...she loved it. She said they would have made her grandma Klawikowski proud!:thumbsup:

We were all around my dad's hospital bed and we all had a good laugh!(and needed one badly).

dkozloski
12-01-12, 02:27 AM
:histeric:

I bet you had some WILD parties!!!These were older people from 50+ so it wasn't a bunch of kids. They knew how to have a good time without stupidity and violence.

Never pass up a chance to attend a Polish wedding or a Polish funeral.

orconn
12-01-12, 09:53 AM
I agree with Koz, never pass up the chance tp go to a Polish wedding! You will learn to polka like you never polkaed before and, "oh" the kielbasa!

dkozloski
12-01-12, 10:08 PM
When I was stationed at Naval Weapons Station, Concord, Ca. There was going to be a four day weekend because of the way Christmas fell with the weekend. We were supposed to get an out of bounds pass if we were going to be traveling more than 100 miles from the bases so just for the hell of it I applied for an out of bounds pass to Alaska for Christmas. Of couse the CO called me in and asked why I didn't apply for leave instead. I said I didn't have any on the books. He had leave papers drawn up for me anyway and instructed that the yeoman could tear them up if I got back in time, that way we were both protected. At that time servicemen in uniform traveled on the airlines for half price so I got home for about $150. Come time to fly back a -60F cold snap rolled in and Pan American Airlines couldn't fly. The Pan Am district manager called my CO and explained that I was going to be late but it wasn't my fault. Along with that an old man was being medivaced on the plane to Seattle but he needed an escort to keep an eye on him and if I agreed to do it I could fly for free. I wound up getting back a day late, the leave papers were torn up, I had a nice Christmas, the return trip was free and I had a good story to tell.

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The Cold War was at it's height, the Cuban Missile Crisis had just occurred, and all the Viet Nam stuff was yet to come. Servicemen in uniform could fly on all the major airlines for 1/2 price, space available. What happened in reality was that reservation holders loaded first, servicemen loaded second, and if there was any space left it went to walkup customers.

I was proud to be in the Navy and I always traveled in my inspection uniform with spitshined shoes. It was fun to look around in the terminal for an Army gravel agitator or Air Force zoomy, sit next to them, and look them up and down a couple of times with their wrinkled clothes and scuffed shoes. Several times I caught Marines doing the same as me. They'd grin at me and I could tell they enjoyed it as much as I did.

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I agree with Koz, never pass up the chance tp go to a Polish wedding! You will learn to polka like you never polkaed before and, "oh" the kielbasa!

I remember watching a music program on PBS that was usually bands playing in a big auditorium. On this occasion it happened to be a polka band and they were good. It didn't take long and everybody in the audience was tapping toes and the like. Some of the young people couldn't stand it and got up and tried to dance to the music but they were getting nowhere. Then all the old geezers got up and showed the kids how to polka and of course they were showing off. The kids were goggle-eyed watching the old folks. It was probably the first time they'd ever seen people holding each other while dancing.

A good time was had by all.

Ranger
12-02-12, 03:32 AM
I was proud to be in the Navy and I always traveled in my inspection uniform with spitshined shoes. It was fun to look around in the terminal for an Army gravel agitator or Air Force zoomy, sit next to them, and look them up and down a couple of times with their wrinkled clothes and scuffed shoes. Several times I caught Marines doing the same as me. They'd grin at me and I could tell they enjoyed it as much as I did.
You seem to have an insatiable appetite to place yourself on some sort of an egotistical pedestal above everyone else. You may look down your nose on the "Army gravel agitator", ground pounder, grunt, mud soldier or any other derogatory term you chose to use, but I can assure you that they have endured more than you superior shoe shiners could ever even fathom in your worst nightmare. As an infantryman (with a combat infantry badge and purple heart) I (nor any other "Army gravel agitator") look up to you in any way. You may be a legend in your own mind, but in the real world you should bow to those who you belittle, for they are so far above you that you could never hold a candle to any of them, even in your wildest dreams.

dkozloski
12-02-12, 03:19 PM
You seem to have an insatiable appetite to place yourself on some sort of an egotistical pedestal above everyone else. You may look down your nose on the "Army gravel agitator", ground pounder, grunt, mud soldier or any other derogatory term you chose to use, but I can assure you that they have endured more than you superior shoe shiners could ever even fathom in your worst nightmare. As an infantryman (with a combat infantry badge and purple heart) I (nor any other "Army gravel agitator") look up to you in any way. You may be a legend in your own mind, but in the real world you should bow to those who you belittle, for they are so far above you that you could never hold a candle to any of them, even in your wildest dreams.
Somehow the Marines didn't have any trouble being as badass as any warrior on earth and have enough pride in their outfit and uniform to show it everywhere they went. In retrospect the airborne guys were pretty sharp looking too. There were sad sacks in every branch but the saddest were the bunch in the rear with the gear.

orconn
12-02-12, 03:37 PM
There are times, Koz, when you are a real jerk ..... unfortunately this seems to be one of them! I personally hold the "ground pounders" of our military forces, whether they be Army or Marine personnel, in my highest regard. Without the men on the ground to to take and hold territory all the work of the other force components is in vain.

dkozloski
12-02-12, 04:19 PM
I have no problem with those wearing a Combat Infantryman's badge looking any way they want to look and I hold them in the highest regard. I never saw a soldier wearing a CIB that looked anything but sharp. I do have a problem with the rear area sad sacks in any branch who have no regard for the uniform they wear and are a disgrace to any outfit. To me it's like stepping on the flag.

Somehow you guys have it in your head that I was criticizing combat veterans. In the era I'm talking about there were very few combat veterans but there were a lot of Cold War draftees that were very unhappy with their lot in life. At that time all Marines and Navy were volunteers. There were zero draftees and it showed.

EcSTSatic
12-03-12, 04:07 PM
Whew! How did we get from Christmas to uniforms! We do digress!

Since we're on it. I'm still not used to seeing service personnel off base in utilities. To my knowledge Marines still can only wear dress uniforms when traveling. Only when going directly to and from base can they wear utilities.

Semper Fi

dkozloski
12-03-12, 08:52 PM
Back in the day, the brown baggers could wear working dungarees from home to work but you better not get out of your car on the way. The same went if you were off the base in a military vehicle. You better not be seen in a quick stop buying an ice cream bar. Most guys changed into civvies before leaving the base. If you were assigned to a ship you kept your civvies at a locker club on base.

Around here all you see are BDUs everywhere. You'd think we were being occupied. Times change and it's a different culture now.

thebigjimsho
12-09-12, 02:33 AM
Do you poop, too?

vincentm
12-10-12, 11:57 AM
Do you poop, too?

Im assuming so, but without odor...

thebigjimsho
12-10-12, 12:27 PM
Im assuming so, but without odor...

I'm fighting off a cold. You should smell mine...

vincentm
12-10-12, 12:43 PM
I'm fighting off a cold. You should smell mine...

Im saying he prolly thinks his doesnt stink

thebigjimsho
12-10-12, 11:19 PM
Mine does.

talismandave
12-11-12, 12:03 AM
Thank you for the lovely Christmas sentiments.

vincentm
12-11-12, 01:47 AM
Mine does.

Mines does too lol

EcSTSatic
12-11-12, 02:44 PM
Not worthy of its own thread, but just in time fro Christmas, BACON shaped themed Adhesive Bandages !!

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51UbG%2BrWr-L._AA300_.jpg

orconn
12-11-12, 04:04 PM
Once again this thread has been hijacked by those who find the pungence of their own scat of more interest than memories of Christmases past. Dickens could have used material like that! I'd suggest a moderator closing this thread before we get into minute fecal analysis!

cadillac kevin
12-11-12, 05:20 PM
None of my christmases were really that special overall. I do remember one christmas when I was 14, my dad saved up and got me a PS2 slim (they had just come out and were on wait list, and he got the last one that hollywood video's video game store had for sale in STL.) I also got a couple games, including need for speed hot pursuit 2 (still an awesome game.) That was a pretty big deal, considering my dad was broke and had to save up for many months to get it for me.

talismandave
12-11-12, 07:00 PM
My Christmas was always special as a child, too many gifts and lots of attention. They were always spent with my maternal grandmother. After she died on my 12th birthday they were never the same. Still too many gifts and lots of attention but it just seemed hollow. Perhaps the absence of grandma, perhaps just growing older. The most special of all were when I became a father. That was when the real magic of Christmas came. Now, they are just a sad reminder of days passed and good times lost.

orconn
12-13-12, 03:18 AM
It seems to me that the most memorable Christmases for most of us really didn't have to do with the material gifts we received, but more to do with our feelings when we gathered with friends and relatives to enjoy the special season.

For me the year was Christmas 1968, a year to remember to be sure, starting off with the capture of our brothers on the USS Pueblo, shortly followed by the Tet offensive which drew many of us into the Vietnam War as participants instead of merely distant observers. Martin Luther King was assassinated and violent riots erupted in many US cities, although they weren't related, riots were taking place in many cities around the world with "Mini Skirt Riots" in many Middle Eastern cities and of course the May Day Demonstrations left Paris and much of France a dysfunctional mess. Bobby Kennedy was killed at the Ambassador Hotel in L.A. and George Wallace was gunned down in Laurel, Maryland. I arrived back in Washington,D.C. to see leaden skies that seemed to be supported by columns of smoke from fires burning in the slums and neighborhoods of the capital.

Intelligence types and many others were pulled from all over the world to beef up our efforts in the Indo Chinese Peninsula. I myself ended up as one of two analysts attached to the 1st Cavalry Division (Air Mobile) at Camp Evans only a few clicks south of the DMZ separating the two Vietnams. For months that Summer I lived and worked in holes in the ground that served as our tent sleeping quarters and our operations area. Sunk in, sand bagged and reinforced ammo case lined bunkers, myself and another analyst provided liaison between our higher headquarters and the CG and his cleared G2 and G3 as we attempted to supply the Cav with meaningful and actionable NVA and VC targets.

Against this bleak year several of us back at headquarters decided that our morale could really do with a meaningful project to occupy our all too little free time. Somehow a small group of us decided that what we should do was to plan and pull off a really special "Christmas Dinner" to let this sad year go out with a bang rather than a whimper. As we talked with our cohorts in our living quarters (I had now been brought back to the "Radio Research" headquarters at Phu Bia, RVN just south of the I Corp city of Hue, considerable interest turned into enthusiasm as many of our fellow trailer mates (we lived in air conditioned prefab trailers the height of luxury compared to the sand bagged trenches I had been living in with the !st Cav). One of the really good things that we did enjoy in Vietnam was outstanding mail service from the "World." Our mail was often delivered within two to three days, and rarely taking more than a week to reach us from the States. Taking advantage of this good fortune we began planning what we would have for our special yuletide feast. Our group numbered around twenty young troops and we agreed that each of us in exchange for $20. would get to pick one menu item, that of course all of would get to share. We enlisted the help of my mother and several of her friends to purchase, pack and ship all these goodies to us at Phu Bai. As word got out among different purveyors of gourmet fare we began to get free contributions from different merchants and producers of the foods we were looking to have for our event. One of the things we all agreed was an absolute must was Hot Rum Toddy Mix! But we absolutely forbade anyone from suggesting "Fruit Cake" as fruit cakes were piling up in such abundance during this 1968 Holiday Season as relatives sent them off to the troops. It had gotten so bad that it was seriously suggested that units used them to build bunkers out of them instead of sand bags! One California vineyard who was so impressed that we had put together our combined cash resources to pay for all this stuff that they donated three cases of their fine red wine and three Jeroboam's of Champaign, all of which was quite illegally shipped through the US Mails to "our boys in Vietnam" (what were the Postal Inspectors going to do indict a bunch of little old ladies from Pasadena for sending Christmas cheer to their sons in Vietnam.

Needless to say this project was a major morale booster for all of involved and for all those cheering us on from the sidelines. About a week before Christmas we started having get togethers where we turned the air conditioning down as far as it would go, stripped to a scivies and invited non member friends to join us for hot rum toddies and Christmas carols (it was the best we could do in the hot and humid land). As luck would have one of these parties was interrupted by loud pounding on our room doors. MP's had been sent to summon all the Episcopalians to the infirmary where they were given gamagobulin shots to immunized them against hepatitis, it turned out the Episcopal guys who had attended mass the evening before had been exposed to the disease because they had all drunk fro the same chalice as the Anglican padre who had come down with hepatitis that afternoon. They all returned to the festivities undaunted but with very sore butts.

The dinner turned out to be a great success and we had so much food that we shared with many of cohorts that weren't part of the original group. But aside from the fun of putting this Yuletide event together and accomplishing really unique "Vietnam" experience, the really great thing which I think all of us who were there really remember was the warm camaraderie that we all shared at the end of that bleak year. I know I have never had a Christmas where so many guys, so far from home and away from their families and loved ones resolved to make the holiday season of 1968 very special and one to always be remember.

Oh, yeah we smuggled a Jeroboam of champaign into the operations area on New Year's eve and the skeleton staff that was on duty all toasted the new year with Piper Heidsick while the brass were off celebrating with whatever they could dig up!

truckinman
12-13-12, 04:04 AM
Being our first Christmas in our own place together, I want it to be special so I got her this. She's wanted this ring for a while now. Will make a nice stocking stuffer! :-)

http://i.pgu.me/ogTQP+X5_original.jpg

talismandave
12-13-12, 10:02 AM
With the current trend of remaking all old movies, I hope if a screenwriter is out there remaking Kelly's Heroes set in Vietnam I hope they see Orconn's post. That story would fit in quite well!

roym01
12-14-12, 03:37 PM
I don't remember many X-Mas days before we had children. I was an only child and my parents didn't have much. Not a lot of 'wow' gifts under the tree. Actually, only 1 that I remember and it was a Johnny 7 machine-gun that shot all kinds of ammo.

After having kids, X-Mas was completely different. I rememeber those. But, they are all grown up now and X-Mas hasn't been the same these past few years.

But now to my point .......... Our first grandchild, Cali Jayde, was born on Nov 22nd and I have that 'special' X-Mas feel again. I would like to get her something special for her first X-Mas, but I also want to give her something that will tell her that her how special she is to her Grandpa M. I want to make sure I leave her with something in case ................. you know, in case we don't get to know each other well. Life is very fragile and, at my age, tomorrow is never a certainty.

I want to leave her a letter that she can't open until 'Grandpa M goes to stay with Jesus'. I want to tell her how much she is loved by Grandma & Grandpa M in case she doesn't get to experience that love in person. I want to tell her how proud she has made us, no matter what path she takes. If we do get to know each other well, the letter might be something that we could reminise about later on.

But, giving her just a letter doesn't seem 'special' enough. I would like to have the letter as part of something else. Maybe attached to a picture frame, maybe in a bottle, maybe tied to a special stuffed animal, etc..... Anybody have any ideas?

orconn
12-14-12, 04:16 PM
I would buy her a ring sized for when she will be a young adult (when she is ready to wear it it can be sized to fit her then). Perhaps have it engraved on the inside telling her your love. I would then put it in an envelope, marked for her to open on her 18th Christmas, along with the letter you have written to her expressing your love. You might want to enclosed a picture of you and your wife holding your new grandchild on her first Christmas. When she opens it on that future Christmas she can once again experience the love you had for her when she was born!

Congratulations on your new family member!

dkozloski
12-14-12, 04:32 PM
Make a video of your home and your life as it is now. By the time she's eighteen it's going to look more like Mad Max, Battle Los Angeles, and the Weimar Republic and she'll need to know it wasn't always like that.

donwon
12-15-12, 07:58 AM
Make all of her birthdays special and seperate from Christmas.
Don't combine both into one.

roym01
12-15-12, 11:36 AM
I would buy her a ring sized for when she will be a young adult (when she is ready to wear it it can be sized to fit her then). Perhaps have it engraved on the inside telling her your love. I would then put it in an envelope, marked for her to open on her 18th Christmas, along with the letter you have written to her expressing your love. You might want to enclosed a picture of you and your wife holding your new grandchild on her first Christmas. When she opens it on that future Christmas she can once again experience the love you had for her when she was born!

Congratulations on your new family member!

Thanks for the congrats Orconn.

That's a great idea! A ring or chain or bracelet and a picture.

orconn
12-15-12, 10:50 PM
Make all of her birthdays special and seperate from Christmas.
Don't combine both into one.

My son was born on Novemebr 23, which happened to be Thanksgving that year, and I agree with domwon keep your grand daughter's separate and special from Christmas. It's hard to do!

orconn
12-16-12, 06:40 PM
Another memorable Christmas comes to mind, it was Christmas of 1957. I had turned fourteen that Summer and my family had return to the States from Brazil. Back to Southern (its' called Central New Jersey now) New Jersey. I had arrived in Miami after a five day plane tour of South America anticipating my first Stateside hamburger and fries with a malted, of course, only to find that my much anticipated dream meal would stay down. I managed to hang in there long enough to help my dad pick out a brand new Oldsmobile 98 four door Holiday (4 door hardtop convertible) as our new car. On the way up the East Coast it was discovered that I had contracted hepatitis A which put me on a fat free restricted diet for at least six months.

By the time the Holiday season rolled around my family had bought and moved into a large (by the standards of the day) house in Moorestown, N.J. and I had started, in September, my first year in high school. I was adjusting to the fact that Philadelphia, much less Moorestown, was not by any stretch Sao Paulo, Brazil. While I was missing my friends and the fun and amenities of that Brazilian city, their were compensations. As luck would have it two beautiful young ladies would become my very good friends. One a beautiful blond who lived across our cul de sac's circle from me, and who looked like a Grace Kelly clone and another beautiful dark haired lovely (a Liz Taylor look alike, no kidding) who had just started her freshman year with me and who had just returned from spending her early years in Paris. Yes, I did have guy friends (also newly arrived at my school), but Katherine and Robin turned out to be my most consistent and supportive friends.

As Christmas approached with all the shopping and gift gathering, not to mention dances, we now solidly out of our childhood stage stage of Holiday wonder and were looking for a new way to put some spirit into what had become sort of hum drum at best. At some point the Lovell Katherine suggested that we go caroling around the neighborhood on Christmas eve. She had gotten several of her friends to join us and so we spent a few hours out caroling to all who would listen. It was great to have our neighbors open their doors and come onto their porches to listen to our bundled up teenage crew! Some offer refreshments others just good cheer. We were all having such a good time that we walked the six blocks to the Episcopal church (we were all Quaker kids) to take in the music and show of Midnight mass.

I remember Christmas 1957 because that was the last time ever that I went caroling although I did go to Episcopal Midnight Mass on many more occasions. Katherine and Robin remained best of friends (Katherine went on to win 1st Runner Up in the 1960 "Miss New Jersey" pageant and eventually, after college became a Pan Am stewardess), Robin and I became our "go to dates" when ever a social function required our attendance. She went on to become a mother of five and I hoe is still happily married to the same guy. What I got out of those years was a real appreciation for smart, beautiful women and a very nice memory of last real, traditional Christmas until I had a family of my own.

P.S. A special thanks to Katherine and Robin who taught me beautiful girls can be good friends!

Jesda
12-16-12, 07:25 PM
I don't celebrate Christmas. I sometimes give gifts.

cadillac kevin
12-16-12, 08:05 PM
I don't celebrate Christmas. I sometimes give crappy gifts many months late.
Fixed!

donwon
12-17-12, 10:21 AM
This year, if my wife is cured of cancer will be right up there with the birth of my oldest daughter.
The Doc says it looks possable.

orconn
12-17-12, 02:31 PM
^^^ Last year my wife was diagnosed with breast cancer. Fortunately the cancer was caught at a very early stage and was removed. With state of the art treatment following surgery there has been no recurrence cancer and the doctors are saying she is cancer free. So it is possible! My thoughts and prayers go out to this Christmas season!

EcSTSatic
12-19-12, 10:55 AM
Those are the best memories. When you can celebrate and give thanks for birth and life !

ben.gators
12-19-12, 08:08 PM
This year, if my wife is cured of cancer will be right up there with the birth of my oldest daughter.
The Doc says it looks possable.

My prayers with you and your family! Sometimes we forget and neglect all the good things around ourselves, and don't realize how gifted we are in our lives, until something bad happens... Three months ago my baby sister was diagnosed with a terrible syndrome. I know how things like this can change the life and how they can change the way we look at the life! The good news is that it seems that the doctors have made a mistake in their diagnosis!

Although no definite cure has been invented or introduced for cancer, there have been enormous advances over the last decade in treating cancer. Keep strong and keep us updated!

talismandave
12-19-12, 09:11 PM
My thoughts and prayers are with you also.
We just got the news yesterday that my aunt has cancer. At 95 she is not looking for any treatment. She has been living in her own home and driving herself around right to the end so not as sad as in a younger person, but sad for us who are losing her none the less.
Between that and finding out my dad has a bad heart valve and an aneurysm (both inoperable) it will not be a cheery Christmas around our house.

donwon
12-21-12, 08:20 AM
Thanks for all the prayers.
The surgery went well and the limpnodes (sp) look good, but they will keep watch on them.
They operated Wed. and she was up several times yesterday.
She called and awakened me at 6: am and was sitting in her chair when she called.
They did have to remove a Kidney.
Thanks TD and I am praying for you and your family, as well as the rest of you.
Wishing evreyone a merry Christmas, and again thanks for the prayers.
Don

orconn
12-21-12, 12:34 PM
Glad to hear your wife's surgery went well! My very best wishes for the coming year!

talismandave
12-22-12, 12:38 AM
Great news Don, Merry Christmas!