: Rear disc/pad removal TIP of the day !



'49 Ford Coupe
11-20-12, 12:37 PM
Yesterday, I started to replace the discs and pads on my '04. Before I did it, I watched some YouTube vids of how to do it. They were helpful, but they all failed to point out a couple of issues that you may run into.

First, the two small bolts in the back of the caliper, though very tight/hard to break loose, weren't too bad to get loose. however, there's a "nut" on the other side that only has two very tiny flats on it that the bolt screws into. Clamp down on those small "round" nuts with vice grips and the bolt will finally unscrew.

The other issue is the 18MM bolts that hold the "caliper mount" to the rear axle housing. Those two bolts were nearly impossible to break loose. The upper one can be accessed with a 12" extension and an impact wrench driver, but still it would not break loose. After hammering on the opposite end of an 18MM box end wrench for a few hundred hits, I was going out of my mind trying to figure out how to get it loose. The hammer I was using was a "medium" size carpenter's hammer. I texted my neighbor to ask if he had a "big" hammer. All he had was a sledge hammer, which was way too much to handle inside the wheel well. But then he goes back home and comes back with a NINE pound "plastic coated exercise weight", for arm exercising. Well, boys and girls, on the second hit with that bar-bell thing, it popped loose. I nearly wanted to kiss my neighbor, and I'm not queer................ahahahahha

So when a big hammer won't work, use exercise weights, and it is much easier to control in tight spaces.

GreaseMonkey
11-20-12, 12:41 PM
You need to learn and experience the benefits of a good penetrating oil such as PB Blaster, Liquid Wrench, etc.

A 50/50 mix of ATF and acetone works the best, but isn't really the safest or convenient to work with.

the cadillac man
11-20-12, 03:45 PM
You need to learn and experience the benefits of a good penetrating oil such as PB Blaster, Liquid Wrench, etc.

A 50/50 mix of ATF and acetone works the best, but isn't really the safest or convenient to work with.

I agree I had to replace a wheel hub on my previous car and it was a pain I learned to use something to loosen it up first before I try to remove it (a few busted knuckles you learn real quick from a mistake)

wesyder
11-20-12, 04:18 PM
Yesterday, I started to replace the discs and pads on my '04. Before I did it, I watched some YouTube vids of how to do it. They were helpful, but they all failed to point out a couple of issues that you may run into.

First, the two small bolts in the back of the caliper, though very tight/hard to break loose, weren't too bad to get loose. however, there's a "nut" on the other side that only has two very tiny flats on it that the bolt screws into. Clamp down on those small "round" nuts with vice grips and the bolt will finally unscrew.

The other issue is the 18MM bolts that hold the "caliper mount" to the rear axle housing. Those two bolts were nearly impossible to break loose. The upper one can be accessed with a 12" extension and an impact wrench driver, but still it would not break loose. After hammering on the opposite end of an 18MM box end wrench for a few hundred hits, I was going out of my mind trying to figure out how to get it loose. The hammer I was using was a "medium" size carpenter's hammer. I texted my neighbor to ask if he had a "big" hammer. All he had was a sledge hammer, which was way too much to handle inside the wheel well. But then he goes back home and comes back with a NINE pound "plastic coated exercise weight", for arm exercising. Well, boys and girls, on the second hit with that bar-bell thing, it popped loose. I nearly wanted to kiss my neighbor, and I'm not queer................ahahahahha

So when a big hammer won't work, use exercise weights, and it is much easier to control in tight spaces.

Yeah theres loctite on those caliper bracket bolts

'49 Ford Coupe
11-20-12, 06:07 PM
Hey GREASE, I simply forgot to mention that I'd soaked it with BP Blaster. And I don't "need to learn" about it. By the way, being a retired mechanical engineer, I DO understand one thing about penetrating oils. And that is that sometimes no amount of penetrating oil helps out one damned bit, if the threads/head to mounting area, etc. is so "tight" that the oil never goes anywhere except sit on the top surface interface.

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My point was that exercise weights are an excellent hammer when you are short of space to sling it to hit something.

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Not only that, but I'm building a street rod "from scratch"....I kinda understand mechanicals.
http://s28.photobucket.com/albums/c231/PaulGerdes/49%20Ford%20Coupe%20Start%20Mid%20May%202011/

the cadillac man
11-20-12, 08:28 PM
Hey GREASE, I simply forgot to mention that I'd soaked it with BP Blaster. And I don't "need to learn" about it. By the way, being a retired mechanical engineer, I DO understand one thing about penetrating oils. And that is that sometimes no amount of penetrating oil helps out one damned bit, if the threads/head to mounting area, etc. is so "tight" that the oil never goes anywhere except sit on the top surface interface.

----------

My point was that exercise weights are an excellent hammer when you are short of space to sling it to hit something.

----------

Not only that, but I'm building a street rod "from scratch"....I kinda understand mechanicals.
http://s28.photobucket.com/albums/c231/PaulGerdes/49%20Ford%20Coupe%20Start%20Mid%20May%202011/

Well I have read the red loctite has to have heat and brute strength to break apart the parts the blue loctite just needs strength to break the bond
(I use the blue loctite on my hobby rc car and trucks)

GreaseMonkey
11-21-12, 09:15 AM
Hey GREASE, I simply forgot to mention that I'd soaked it with BP Blaster. And I don't "need to learn" about it. By the way, being a retired mechanical engineer, I DO understand one thing about penetrating oils. And that is that sometimes no amount of penetrating oil helps out one damned bit, if the threads/head to mounting area, etc. is so "tight" that the oil never goes anywhere except sit on the top surface interface.

----------

My point was that exercise weights are an excellent hammer when you are short of space to sling it to hit something.

----------

Not only that, but I'm building a street rod "from scratch"....I kinda understand mechanicals.
http://s28.photobucket.com/albums/c231/PaulGerdes/49%20Ford%20Coupe%20Start%20Mid%20May%202011/

My apologies.

From your original post it sounded like you had never taken a rusty bolt off before, especially considering you had to watch a YouTube video on how to do a rear brake job.

osure
11-21-12, 09:25 AM
Also on the first bolts to get caliper off, the bolt with the flat spots takes a 14mm open end wrench. Much easier than clapping

'49 Ford Coupe
11-21-12, 01:23 PM
My apologies, in return............ I have found that regardless of one's talents and experience, a quick YouTube reference seems to nearly ALWAYS make a given task, whether "car stuff" or any other "how to" subject, (if it's the first time on a given issue), to ease any "surprises" once a task is started. For instance, you could review my posts and the huge thread regarding suspension leveling system that I found most helpful, but then after I fixed the system, I thought it reasonable to I throw my two cents in also to help other guys who, for the first time, decided to dive into repairs on the compressor/solenoid/troubleshooting of that system.

Yea, Osure, I saw the flats just as I was clamping down on it.... they are surely tiny....

All is well.

yamla_jatt806
11-24-12, 05:35 PM
Guys - I just got done installing new pads and rotors on rear of my 05 Escalade. The pads came off easily but the big bolts holding the caliper brackets were pretty tough. I had good luck using a heavy, long metal pipe over the 1/2" socket wrench, simple physics I guess. Also the rotors were frozen and wouldn't budge, I ended up using penetrating oil and a sledgehammer to get the rotors off. There were a couple of retaining washers that needed to be cut off to get the old rotors off.

BTW...I also used a YouTube video as a guide.

Slapperbar
11-25-12, 01:12 AM
As far as a "penetrating oil", I've found that Zyglo oil from Magnaflux will work where all else fails. Just by design it has a high capillary action that will get into the smallest fissure.

the blur
11-25-12, 10:59 AM
Use an open end wrench on the caliper slide pins, NEVER a vise grip. And they need to be lubed, and greased well inside the bracket bore. If they seize up, you have problems.

The bracket bolts are torqued to 160 ft-lbs. Maybe 180, I don't have the book handy. Liquid wrench won't help here. They are not rusted. They are pre-loctited from the factory. They are 1 use bolts, but you can use more loctite and use them again.

tonyova
01-11-13, 11:45 AM
were is the video so I can learn to do my own as well on a 06 escalade base

yamla_jatt806
01-14-13, 06:08 PM
were is the video so I can learn to do my own as well on a 06 escalade base

Just do a search on YouTube.

the cadillac man
01-14-13, 07:34 PM
Just do a search on YouTube.

+1 I agree watching someone else do the work helps

Romulus1
01-15-13, 02:28 AM
Brakes are pretty straight forward especially these ones. I just did the rears on my 03, pads+rotors. took me just under 50 mins. get a long ass wrench that gives you lots of leverage and combine that with penetrating oil (if needed, i use liquid wrench but i actually didnt need it for either side this time) and you'll have zero problem breaking any of those bolts loose.