: Northstar v8



B1n2fra
11-18-12, 03:21 PM
I've read other posts of the northstar sounding sorta like a diesel engine. But no one has given a definite answer as to if this is normal or if and what could be causing this sound.

1BadCadSTS
11-18-12, 03:27 PM
It's the Vvt

WWZ
11-18-12, 03:50 PM
It is necessary to add - faulty VVT

KRSTS
11-18-12, 03:52 PM
Not normal

EChas3
11-18-12, 05:17 PM
Opinions vary. Some noise is normal. Excessive noise is never 'normal'.

B1n2fra
11-18-12, 06:06 PM
It's not loud at all sometimes you can't hear it unless your listening for it.

DarkMingBlueSTS
11-18-12, 06:23 PM
Mine sounds kind of like a steam train that's really far away. It's not loud at all but of course I hear every little noise that pops up with this car...3.6 though

dkozloski
11-18-12, 06:57 PM
The V8 VVT valve train is noisy. Cadillac added those plastic panels around the engine compartment to reduce the high frequency component for a good reason.

WWZ
11-18-12, 07:32 PM
"Diesel" noise appears only at malfunction of VVT. Very similar noise at BMW engines with Vanos system (analog of VVT).

truckinman
11-18-12, 07:36 PM
Mine sounds kind of like a steam train that's really far away. It's not loud at all but of course I hear every little noise that pops up with this car...3.6 though

Lol. I'm the same. Every little noise I hear perks my ears up. Lol

WWZ
11-18-12, 07:39 PM
Lol. I'm the same. Every little noise I hear perks my ears up. Lol
Make louder music - all noise will disappear)))

1BadCadSTS
11-18-12, 07:46 PM
I just let my corsa sing louder hahaha

WWZ
11-18-12, 08:10 PM
To whom that is pleasant...)))

Submariner409
11-18-12, 08:22 PM
Engines are made of several types of metals with varying clearances, expansion rates and frequency nodes. An engine should - WILL - make a busy, efficient series of noises, beginning at dead cold and changing frequency/pitch as the mechanism reaches operating temperature.

Because new car owners actually believe "quiet car" advertising hype and claims, as well as passing down old wives' tales, they go freako when an engine says "Hello, I'm running". Normal. It's the loud knocks, clangs, bangs and thunks that should trigger warnings at the base of your skull - not busy valvetrain noise. My STS is packed with excess pounds of cutesy sound deadening stuff to prevent me from listening to engine music ...... so are most cars nowadays. Take the engine beauty cover off your Northstar and drive for a day. The noise will give you the Screaming Mimi's.

Good thing none of you have ever heard a 32 valve DOHC solid lifter chain drive setup running straight 30W oil start up at 20 degrees F. The dealer warranty weeps would be a mile long.

WWZ
11-18-12, 08:31 PM
It is clear heard knocks, especially a ring indicate obvious malfunction of the engine, and deaf knocks at VVT work too testify to malfunction. In any case it is necessary to make engine diagnostics.

dkozloski
11-19-12, 12:13 AM
Engines are made of several types of metals with varying clearances, expansion rates and frequency nodes. An engine should - WILL - make a busy, efficient series of noises, beginning at dead cold and changing frequency/pitch as the mechanism reaches operating temperature.

Because new car owners actually believe "quiet car" advertising hype and claims, as well as passing down old wives' tales, they go freako when an engine says "Hello, I'm running". Normal. It's the loud knocks, clangs, bangs and thunks that should trigger warnings at the base of your skull - not busy valvetrain noise. My STS is packed with excess pounds of cutesy sound deadening stuff to prevent me from listening to engine music ...... so are most cars nowadays. Take the engine beauty cover off your Northstar and drive for a day. The noise will give you the Screaming Mimi's.

Good thing none of you have ever heard a 32 valve DOHC solid lifter chain drive setup running straight 30W oil start up at 20 degrees F. The dealer warranty weeps would be a mile long.In 1960, as a 20 year old kid, I overhauled the engine in my boss's Cadillac. He came into the shop to see how the work was progressing, stood alongside the car, and asked me when I thought I would get it running. I told him it was running right now. He glanced over and was startled to see the fan turning but the engine wasn't making a sound. I got a bonus for that job.

B1n2fra
11-20-12, 08:57 AM
Once again still no definite answer. Anyone else has this same issue with their northstar??

Lifer
11-20-12, 01:26 PM
In 1960, as a 20 year old kid, I overhauled the engine in my boss's Cadillac. He came into the shop to see how the work was progressing, stood alongside the car, and asked me when I thought I would get it running. I told him it was running right now. He glanced over and was startled to see the fan turning but the engine wasn't making a sound. I got a bonus for that job.

I had an airplane engine get real quiet once. A PW R-1340 in an Otter over the Hoi An River. Real quiet. The fan just running and then stopped. At 10,000 feet. It happened when I pulled the throttle back a tad to descend from our working altitude. The Spartan Manufacturing rebuild's hollow push rod bent when the pressures changed at throttle change and punctured the push rod case. All the oil went raining down to the ground and the engine just froze. So quiet, all the way down to the ground. That quiet was a noise I did not want to hear. Perfect landing, and the engine was scraped for parts.

dkozloski
11-20-12, 03:49 PM
I had an airplane engine get real quiet once. A PW R-1340 in an Otter over the Hoi An River. Real quiet. The fan just running and then stopped. At 10,000 feet. It happened when I pulled the throttle back a tad to descend from our working altitude. The Spartan Manufacturing rebuild's hollow push rod bent when the pressures changed at throttle change and punctured the push rod case. All the oil went raining down to the ground and the engine just froze. So quiet, all the way down to the ground. That quiet was a noise I did not want to hear. Perfect landing, and the engine was scraped for parts.Exhaust pushrods are a well known problem for P&W 1340s and there has been an AD Note issued for at least 35 years.

Lifer
11-20-12, 08:14 PM
Exhaust pushrods are a well known problem for P&W 1340s and there has been an AD Note issued for at least 35 years.

No 1340 rebuilt by Pratt and Whitney failed from push rod failure during its use in Viet Nam. Only the Spartan Rebuild. We always knew the difference. PW put a Lincoln penny on the crankcase cover recess - In God We Trust. Their push rods were made of solid material.

dkozloski
11-20-12, 09:25 PM
No 1340 rebuilt by Pratt and Whitney failed from push rod failure during its use in Viet Nam. Only the Spartan Rebuild. We always knew the difference. PW put a Lincoln penny on the crankcase cover recess - In God We Trust. Their push rods were made of solid material.The original P&W 1340 pushrods were made from aluminum tubing with pressed on steel ball ends and the exhaust pushrods failed. P&W made replacement pushrods that were steel tube with pressed on steel ball ends and they didn't fail. Evidently Spartan was using old stock from somewhere.

It's well to remember that this engine first went into production in various models and power ratings in the late 1920s and the Lord only knows where Spartan's replacement parts may have come from and how old they were.

The emblem that P&W put on the front of the oil sump on their engines was copper/enamal, about 2 inches in diameter, and featured the P&W bald eagle. Very few lasted there very long because mechanics pried them off and turned them into belt buckles. Any penny found on a P&W engine was put there by somebody other than P&W.

Lifer
11-21-12, 05:51 PM
You are right about the time span these fine engines were made and used. And yes, I do remember the ball ends on the pushrods. I recall a copper color rod with steel-colored ends. Also I remember that there was a dab of color on the engine that represented the stage of rebore the engine had. The mechanics in my unit told me that the purple, which was on most of them, was the last color. These engines were fairly old. The planes were built in the early 50's and part of the 350 purchase by the Army. Many had been in Germany before being sent to Nam.

dkozloski
11-21-12, 09:55 PM
Several I worked on had spent time in Antarctica with the Navy.

Lifer
11-22-12, 05:07 PM
Several I worked on had spent time in Antarctica with the Navy.

They were painted white with a bright stripe on the tail and on the cowl chin. Called U1-A in the Army, and UC-1 for the Navy.

Its a rough plane for a young pilot because it is slow. Its a great plane for an old pilot because it is slow. My co-pilot in Nam was a fighter pilot during WWII and he was in love with the low, slow, reliable Otter. I was bored to death, but still did enjoy flying.

dkozloski
11-22-12, 10:57 PM
They're like flying a great big Super Cub. Climb dive and glide at 75 knots. The part I found weird was climbing out nose down; kind of like going up in a balloon.

Lifer
11-23-12, 10:42 PM
Yea, you take off by first getting the tail up to horizontal and then ease the nose down to fly away. You then squeeze the flaps up slowly as you gain speed and lift. Or you could start out with 0 flaps down, run hard, again with the tail flying and then pump the flaps down to full flaps real fast. She would jump up in the air for a short field take off. Noise slightly down you then bleed the flaps and again pick up speed and a good flying attitude. (This take-off style is illegal, but was done every day).

Land is again nose down until round-out. The correct landing is three-point, but always some cowboy wants to grease 'er in on two wheels DC-3 style until the empennage stops flying. Considered dangerous. Also max crosswinds were a problem in this bird, but I did it once and landed straight. Whooo...

B1n2fra
11-24-12, 12:41 AM
This has gone so far from the original post..................

dkozloski
11-24-12, 11:02 AM
Like a good conversation.

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Yea, you take off by first getting the tail up to horizontal and then ease the nose down to fly away. You then squeeze the flaps up slowly as you gain speed and lift. Or you could start out with 0 flaps down, run hard, again with the tail flying and then pump the flaps down to full flaps real fast. She would jump up in the air for a short field take off. Noise slightly down you then bleed the flaps and again pick up speed and a good flying attitude. (This take-off style is illegal, but was done every day).

Land is again nose down until round-out. The correct landing is three-point, but always some cowboy wants to grease 'er in on two wheels DC-3 style until the empennage stops flying. Considered dangerous. Also max crosswinds were a problem in this bird, but I did it once and landed straight. Whooo...The most graceful way I found to land a taildragger like an Otter is to trim it nose down, make a tail low wheel landing, and relax back pressure as the main wheels touch.