: Another Catch Can Installation (with pics)



HurstGN
11-05-12, 11:58 PM
UPDATE: Pic url's have been corrected. Let me know if there are problems viewing the pics now.

I finally got around to installing my catch can today. For those interested, here's the install and pics of what I did.

I started by removing the engine cover, the left and right engine bay covers, and removed the strut tower brace. I then removed the 8 10mm bolts and the 4 13mm bolts holding the upper intake cover on. I had previously opened the intake and cleaned out the collected oil in the intake. Upon opening the intake again, I find the intake looks like it did just a couple thousand miles ago. It looks like I never touched it. These pics show the oil after just a couple thousand miles.

Oil on upper intake cover (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkU1RnSHR3SnBIWGs)
Oil in intake (1) (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkVUtTdHk4bmxxNTQ)
Oil in intake (2) (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkaEVhMTdJc2RwdTQ)
Oil in intake (3) (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkY04yLVdWNkhxMzg)

I also removed the hose connected to the throttle body and found some oil there too.

Oil in throttle body (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkaVUzQzVZM2h6bzA)

So I again cleaned up everything and closed up the intake.

Clean upper intake cover (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkM201VjNnRUZuclE)
Clean intake (1) (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkM1cwTXphSkxmQVE)
Clean intake (2) (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkak94ZmVVWmRZTXc)
Clean throttle body (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkUjk0akE0ejdmVWs)

I then removed the hose that goes from the passenger side cover to the intake. It's a rigid line with a little bit of give to it. Here you can see the part that attaches to the cover. I'm going to cut it midway to allow hooking the provided hose to the catch can.

Line before cut (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkSmFBWWVOYS1HMGM)

This picture shows where I made the cut. The looming is a solid loom, so before cutting, I decided how much looming I wanted to remove, cut the loom to separate it into 2 pieces, then carefully split the solid looming so I could remove it. Once removed, I cut the solid line as shown here.

Cut line (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkQThwenNHbzEybzg)

Next I assembled the bracket to the catch can with the bolts and washers provided. I used the lower 2 holes in the can bracket and adjusted the bracket to go as low as it would go when using these 2 holes. I then attached the bracket to one of the two 10mm bolts at the firewall near where the heated washer unit used to be. (Gotta get that replacement someday.) I attached the provided hose the the line, and then reinstalled the line to the intake. This allowed me to measure the length of hose needed to reach the outlet port of the catch can and I connected the hose to the outlet. I then attached another piece of hose the the piece that goes to the passenger cover. I reattached the fitting to the passenger cover and measured the hose to attach to the inlet port on the catch can. I attached the hose to the inlet port on the catch can and I'm basically ready to button things up.

Catch Can attached to firewall (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkU0FQc0YxWXhCYkk)
Close-up of connected hoses (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkODBZOWotWkluRDg)
View from top looking down (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkTlZBdV9oRVhGWXM)
View from the shock tower (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkY1pqLU1RbU9adXM)

OK, everything all buttoned up and ready to go.

Finished view from above (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkdE9UY0RuZXlvMTg)
View from the passenger side (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkLXp3ODJjNmlLek0)

I think this install is pretty clean. From the front of the car, you don't notice anything changed since there is nothing installed up by the drive belts. The can is only visible at the rear of the engine compartment.

I took my time and did this in just less than 2 hours. Now I need to figure out how I'm gonna clean the intake valves.

tinman
11-06-12, 09:18 AM
"Now I need to figure out how I'm gonna clean the intake valves."

When you figure that out post it, too. Nice writeup, HurstGN.

CoupeGuy
11-06-12, 11:38 AM
403 error getting to pic(s)

tinman
11-06-12, 11:49 AM
403 error getting to pic(s)
Ditto on pix.

tinman
11-06-12, 11:49 AM
403 error getting to pic(s)
Ditto on pix.

MoFex
11-06-12, 12:27 PM
403 error getting to pic(s)

Same here

HurstGN
11-07-12, 02:13 PM
OK, seems Google Drive makes the URL's available for a short period of time then they expire. I'll try to find someplace on-line to post them so they can be viewed here.

tinman
11-07-12, 05:23 PM
I use picasa from Google. You can easily upload to a cloud server.

pajeff10
11-07-12, 10:08 PM
Photobucket works well for pics and is free. I'd like to see your setup.

HurstGN
11-07-12, 10:21 PM
UPDATE: Pic url's have been corrected. Let me know if there are problems viewing the pics now.

If you right click the pic and select "View Image", you will get the image in full resolution for more detail on the shots.

SC2150
11-08-12, 09:02 AM
Here are puctures of the blower rotors and housing after 14,000 miles of having the RX can installed on a new one:

http://i262.photobucket.com/albums/ii115/RevXtreme1/RXcanonZL1blowerfor14kmiles.jpg
http://i262.photobucket.com/albums/ii115/RevXtreme1/RXcanonZL1blowerfor14kmiles2.jpg

No residue build up on the rotors to throw off balance, no build up to obstruct the flow and heat transfer ability of the intercooler like this example of 15,000 mile w/out the can:
http://i262.photobucket.com/albums/ii115/RevXtreme1/Maggieintercoolerwithoilcontamination.jpg

To order, call direct: 941-721-1826

tinman
11-08-12, 01:46 PM
There you go...works just right for me.

eborunda
11-17-12, 10:46 AM
UPDATE: Pic url's have been corrected. Let me know if there are problems viewing the pics now.

I finally got around to installing my catch can today. For those interested, here's the install and pics of what I did.

I started by removing the engine cover, the left and right engine bay covers, and removed the strut tower brace. I then removed the 8 10mm bolts and the 4 13mm bolts holding the upper intake cover on. I had previously opened the intake and cleaned out the collected oil in the intake. Upon opening the intake again, I find the intake looks like it did just a couple thousand miles ago. It looks like I never touched it. These pics show the oil after just a couple thousand miles.

Oil on upper intake cover (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkU1RnSHR3SnBIWGs)
Oil in intake (1) (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkVUtTdHk4bmxxNTQ)
Oil in intake (2) (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkaEVhMTdJc2RwdTQ)
Oil in intake (3) (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkY04yLVdWNkhxMzg)

I also removed the hose connected to the throttle body and found some oil there too.

Oil in throttle body (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkaVUzQzVZM2h6bzA)

So I again cleaned up everything and closed up the intake.

Clean upper intake cover (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkM201VjNnRUZuclE)
Clean intake (1) (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkM1cwTXphSkxmQVE)
Clean intake (2) (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkak94ZmVVWmRZTXc)
Clean throttle body (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkUjk0akE0ejdmVWs)

I then removed the hose that goes from the passenger side cover to the intake. It's a rigid line with a little bit of give to it. Here you can see the part that attaches to the cover. I'm going to cut it midway to allow hooking the provided hose to the catch can.

Line before cut (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkSmFBWWVOYS1HMGM)

This picture shows where I made the cut. The looming is a solid loom, so before cutting, I decided how much looming I wanted to remove, cut the loom to separate it into 2 pieces, then carefully split the solid looming so I could remove it. Once removed, I cut the solid line as shown here.

Cut line (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkQThwenNHbzEybzg)

Next I assembled the bracket to the catch can with the bolts and washers provided. I used the lower 2 holes in the can bracket and adjusted the bracket to go as low as it would go when using these 2 holes. I then attached the bracket to one of the two 10mm bolts at the firewall near where the heated washer unit used to be. (Gotta get that replacement someday.) I attached the provided hose the the line, and then reinstalled the line to the intake. This allowed me to measure the length of hose needed to reach the outlet port of the catch can and I connected the hose to the outlet. I then attached another piece of hose the the piece that goes to the passenger cover. I reattached the fitting to the passenger cover and measured the hose to attach to the inlet port on the catch can. I attached the hose to the inlet port on the catch can and I'm basically ready to button things up.

Catch Can attached to firewall (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkU0FQc0YxWXhCYkk)
Close-up of connected hoses (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkODBZOWotWkluRDg)
View from top looking down (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkTlZBdV9oRVhGWXM)
View from the shock tower (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkY1pqLU1RbU9adXM)

OK, everything all buttoned up and ready to go.

Finished view from above (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkdE9UY0RuZXlvMTg)
View from the passenger side (https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0ZYPGZVAIZkLXp3ODJjNmlLek0)

I think this install is pretty clean. From the front of the car, you don't notice anything changed since there is nothing installed up by the drive belts. The can is only visible at the rear of the engine compartment.

I took my time and did this in just less than 2 hours. Now I need to figure out how I'm gonna clean the intake valves.

Excuse my ignorance but What is a catch can ?

pajeff10
11-17-12, 08:37 PM
A catch can is a container that mounts in the PCV (Positive Crankcase Ventilation) system. For whatever reason, since around 1997 when the LS1 was introduced, some GM engines tend to pull engine oil through the PCV system into the throttle body and/or intake. This coats the inside of the intake with an oily film and also causes the back of the intake valves to get gunked up. Installing the catch can separates the oil from the engine vapors and greatly reduces the amount of oil drawn into the engine. I run a catch can setup on our '02 Trans Am and it works very well.

X E Ryder
01-09-13, 09:19 PM
"Now I need to figure out how I'm gonna clean the intake valves."

When you figure that out post it, too. Nice writeup, HurstGN.

Surely you folks have to know about SeaFoam!?! It attacks carbon particles and essentially breaks down their "glue" so they cannot adhere to each other, thus the carbon deposits erode down and disappear safely out the exhaust pipe. This stuff will even help freshen up a weak catalytic converter. Here is the company website: http://www.seafoamsales.com/

You can buy it at NAPA usually.

102183

To clean deposits from the tops of cylinders and the backs of intake valves on fuel injected engines, add 1 oz. Sea Foam to each gallon of fuel. Sea Foam will slowly re-liquefy the deposits. << OR >>

To remove deposits more quickly, Sea Foam can be induced directly into the combustion chamber via the following method. Since Sea Foam contains Volital Organic Compounds make sure this method is approved by the state in which your planning to use it. With the engine warmed up and running, SLOWLY POUR 1/3 to ½ can of Sea Foam down the carburetor throat or into any main manifold vacuum line that DISTRIBUTES EVENLY TO ALL CYLINDERS. Note that some newer induction systems, like those found on Vortec and Subaru “H” style engines, do not have any vacuum line that distribute evenly. Consequently, this process should only be attempted by technicians with a comprehensive understanding of the engine’s induction system or use Sea Foam Spray through the throttle body (described in a different section of this web site).

Once the product has been applied, turn off the engine and allow the Sea Foam to heat soak for a minimum of 10 minutes. At this time, Sea Foam will dissolve deposits. After allowing the Sea Foam to soak, restart the engine in a WELL VENTILATED AREA as exhaust will be extreme for a short time. Drive aggressively for 2 to 5 miles to allow all the atomized deposits to be safely expelled from the system. REPEAT SEA FOAM TREATMENT AS NECESSARY.

Performing a Sea Foam Engine Treatment on a Fuel Injected Engine

Begin by parking the vehicle in a well ventilated area. Locate a vacuum line that you are certain DISTRIBUTES EVENLY TO ALL CYLINDERS. On many vehicles the easiest option is taking the vacuum line from your brake booster PCV. (See notes about special situations such as the Vortex or Subaru H style engines.) If you are not certain, contact a certified technician.
102180

Start the engine. For automatic transmissions, keep the car in PARK. For manual transmissions, put the car in neutral and apply the parking brake. SLOWLY POUR 1/3 to ½ can of Sea Foam Motor Treatment into the vacuum hose, while at the same time revving the engine to about 2000 RPMs. You will begin to see clouds of white exhaust from the tailpipes. When you have finished pouring, turn off the engine and let it sit for at least 10 minutes.
102181

Now start the vehicle again. Drive it aggressively (but legally) for about 2 to 5 miles or until the white smoke is no longer being produced. REPEAT SEA FOAM TREATMENT AS NECESSARY.
102182

It makes a cloud of smoke so make sure you are outdoors!

tinman
01-09-13, 09:36 PM
I'm quite familiar with Seafoam. But we have DirectInjection.

X E Ryder
01-09-13, 09:39 PM
I'm quite familiar with Seafoam. But we have DirectInjection.

Refer to second half of post - you draw it in via vacuum port - works, just don't let it "drink" to fast.

SC2150
01-10-13, 08:18 AM
Seafoam, BG, and every dealer service center will have similar...does work, but some of those hard particles are forced between the piston and cylinder walls causing minor scouring, so it should be used spareingly. It is one of the easiest ways to clean the vlaves some (only manual cleaning will clean them like new again).

:thumbsup:

HurstGN
01-16-13, 12:38 PM
Refer to second half of post - you draw it in via vacuum port - works, just don't let it "drink" to fast.

OK, what port? The pictures are not of a DI 3.6. If I pull the engine cover off, there is the vacuum line coming from the PCV/Catch Can side. With this port removed, the engine will not start. And if you try to do this with the engine already started, you can't keep it running once you remove this line. so where is the preferred location to introduce the seafoam? Not everyone has an assistant on-call to assist with these things.

X E Ryder
01-16-13, 04:53 PM
Ok buddy I hear ya, but with no cable driven throttle body, you are going to need someones foot on the gas. Use the vacuum side going to the top, center front of your intake.

I suggest using 3ft or so of clear 3/8" tube, and about 3ft of clear 1/8" tube - one that will slip INside the larger tube - overlap about 8" - this lets some air leak in around the two tubes and helps mix / regulate the flow of cleaner. Hold the small tube alongside the seafoam can and use a marker to indicate where about the top one third of the can is. Remember we use 1/3 the can only on a hot engine.

Use a tube clamp or vise grips to pinch the hose off so you can start your CTS

Carefully release the hose and meter the cleaner with the hose kink. You are being a sort of rudimentary carburetor! Your helper needs to increase rpm above idle as the engine labors on the cleaner some.

Shut it off and wait 15 min - fire it up and clean it out good with some mellow revs, then go drive it hard a couple runs.

I might try to make a video of this next week because I think this will come up again!

(Whew messy post - using phone - ill fix later)

SC2150
02-17-15, 05:11 PM
This is an article on Yahoo by Consumer Reports, see the link below to read it. Keep in mind one very important detail, in the article they reference a TSB sent to customers by Kia & BMW recommending a fuel additive once in a while. The problem with that is the fuel never touches the valves so additives are a complete waste of money with direct injection.

Direct-injection engines improve performance and save fuel, but at a price
283730
It has been touted as the automotive holy grail, the ultimate marriage of better performance and greater fuel economy. It’s the direct-injection (DI) engine, the latest technology designed to squeeze more mpg out of cars. And it has actually been delivering results.

For example, the Mazda3’s combined fuel economy jumped from 28 mpg in 2010 to 32 mpg in 2012 in our testing of the new Skyactiv engine. Other automakers have been using direct injection to add horsepower—the Cadillac CTS, for example, gained 34 hp—without any sacrifice in fuel economy.

Though direct injection is currently seen mostly on luxury vehicles or on mainstream cars as a higher-trim option (priced anywhere from a few hundred dollars to a couple of thousand), it could soon be within the means of more drivers as costs continue to come down.

But those engines are also having reliability problems, something that automakers are trying to keep quiet.

Not surprisingly, a number of readers have asked us about direct injection. Take Anestis Halkidis of North Kingstown, R.I.:

“I have a 2006 VW GLI with the 2.0T FSI engine with direct injection,” he wrote. “At around 80,000 miles, I went to the VW dealer to diagnose a check-engine light. It turns out that the intake valves had to be cleaned due to carbon deposits that were causing drivability issues.”

When his dealer failed to offer free work or any compensation, Halkidis took his car to a local VW shop that cleaned the valves by blasting them with walnut shells. (Yes, walnut shells; it’s a method used by BMW.) The cost to Halkidis was about $400.

So what’s up with direct injection?

First, a primer on how it works: By injecting gas*oline at high pressure directly into the engine’s combustion chamber, direct injection more precisely measures fuel than conventional fuel-injection systems or old-time carburetors.

The result is more complete combustion and cooler cylinder temperatures that enable a higher compression ratio for greater efficiency and power. Engine technology supplier Bosch says that direct injection can return a 15 percent gain in fuel economy while boosting low-end torque as much as 50 percent.

Combining direct injection with other technologies—such as turbocharging—can deliver even greater gains in economy and performance. That in turn enables carmakers to use smaller displacement engines, resulting in an efficiency snowball effect. Many automakers are marketing DI as pro*viding fuel economy that’s almost as good as a hybrid’s, and with better performance—but without the $4,000 hybrid premium.

Although the breakthrough seems like a dream come true, an unwanted side effect has been emerging. Letter writers have complained to Consumer Reports and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) that over time DI can lead to clogged fuel systems and engine carbon buildup. The result can be engine hesitation and a loss of power—and the need for expensive repairs.

Some carmakers, including BMW and Kia, have issued technical service bulletins (TSBs) to their dealers recommending that drivers use only name-brand detergent gasoline—without ethanol additives—and that they periodically add a fuel-system cleaner when they refuel. (A TSB is an alert that the automaker sends to dealers to warn about ongoing problems with individual models and how to fix them. It may allow dealers to make repairs at little or no cost to the customer as a goodwill gesture.)

Other automakers have devised an engineering fix that works while the car is oper*ating. It involves modifying the engine to spray a small amount of fuel directly onto the valves to help keep them clean.

It’s important to note that not all cars with direct injection experience long-term problems. But if your engine stumbles more than it used to, or it suddenly lacks power, ask your dealer about it. A fix may be available, and you may not have to pay for it.

This article also appeared in the February 2015 issue of Consumer Reports magazine.





Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. Copyright © 2006-2015 Consumers Union of U.S.

https://autos.yahoo.com/news/direct-injection-engines-improve-performance-save-fuel-price-193000698.html?soc_src=mediacontentstory&amp;soc_trk=m a