: Winter storage tips.



I~LUV~Caddys8792
11-04-12, 02:54 PM
Hey everyone,

Looking to store my Marauder soon. I've got a 3 car garage at home, so I don't need to store it offsite somewhere. I'm just wondering what I'll need to do before I put it in dry-dock for the winter.

Should I leave the tank about half full? I plan on starting it a couple times a month, just to get the juices flowing and keep the engine's seals lubricated. It won't be going anywhere, just idling in the garage.

Because I'll be starting it fairly often, do I need to put a stabilizer in the fuel?

Is there anything else I'm missing?

HAZZARDJOHN
11-04-12, 03:03 PM
Gas tank as full as possible (will help alleviate evaporation) use Sta-bil, It's just cheap insurance and will cause no harm. As far as mice control, I have no Idea, I have tried and done everything and none of it works 100%. We tried something that doesn't smell in the RV last year and as far as I know there was no rodent signs in the spring. If you are going to start it, let it run for a while and get everything nice and hot otherwise all you will be doing is creating moisture. I put the car up on stands when I have expensive tires, I have never had a flat spot problem when I didn't though, but still, cheap insurance. Clean the car vigorously and cover it even in the garage. Lastly, make sure no A-hole puts anything on the car because they figure "it's covered what's the big deal?" Good luck and if possible run a couple tanks of non oxy gas through the lines to not have any ethanol in the lines. I run it in my Caddy, but In MN it is tough to get a station that lets you put it in a new car.

gary88
11-04-12, 03:22 PM
Fill tank completely and add fuel stabilizer.
Block off the exhaust with something to keep rodents out.
Leave a window slightly cracked open.
Buy a battery tender.
Fill the tires to around 40psi or so.
Change the oil if it's close to needing it.


Do not start it during storage unless you plan on actually driving it and getting everything up to full operating temperature.

Also you will go through withdrawl symptoms from not being able to drive your car for ~4 months so mentally prepare yourself for that.

Submariner409
11-04-12, 03:26 PM
Do not start the car every week or so - that's a big no-no. The engine never gets warm enough to burn off condensation and acids in the crankcase/valve covers.

Do an oil/filter change with proper viscosity synthetic (it tends to stay in bearings and on surfaces longer than conventionals) and go for a 20 mile drive, fill the gas tank, adding a fuel stabilizer and head to the garage/home. Shut down and connect a battery minder (2 or 3 amp
"smart charger") and place several fabric softener papers in the engine compartment, passenger compartment, and trunk: Rodents HATE the stuff. If you really want to go fanatic, place the car up on jackstands with the suspension arms on the stand pads: suspension loaded. Deflate the tires to about 8 - 10 pounds.

In the marine industry we use engine oil and fuel stabilizers (NOT the so-called Lucas "stabilizer" snake oil) designed for long-term gasoline engine storage and have no problems with over a year of storage - engine never started.

(gary88 beat me to it...........)

Think about his exhaust pipe comment: In a V-8 engine there will ALWAYS be one or two cylinders with valves in overlap - a straight air path from the tailpipe to the throttlebody - and air WILL move through there.

CadillacLuke24
11-04-12, 04:12 PM
Far as rodent deterrent goes, I've read that fabric softener sheets around the car seem to deter them quite well.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
11-04-12, 06:10 PM
OK, so:

full tank of gas w/ stabilizer
Cap off exhaust pipes
Fill tires to 40 PSI (to ward off flat spots I'm guessing)

Now, I've never had a problem with mice in our garage before, but I suppose a few dryer sheets never hurt.

Don't start it at all
Oil is good, just changed with Motorcraft Semi-Synthetic 2000 miles ago. The local Ford dealer recommends every 5k miles.
Buy car cover. Where does one buy a car cover for the Hindenburg? Target? Napa?

I've thought about the withdrawal symptoms.... I'm not looking forward to that. Atleast I got a winter car I like.

markopolo50
11-04-12, 06:49 PM
You forgot the battery tender, or unhook if you don't want a dead battery.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
11-04-12, 06:58 PM
What is a battery tender?

Stoneage_Caddy
11-04-12, 07:15 PM
http://batterytender.com/products/automotive.html

do change the oil , and i mean when you are done moving it into its hibernation spot and dont restart till your ready to drive it again....acids in the oil is what hurts mainbearings and the like , new oil = no acids

got jackstands? jack it up and put the stands under it so the tires dont touch the ground ....ive tried everything else but i get flatspots if i dont use jackstands and keep the tires off the ground.

fill the tank , put stabil in there , might as well fill it becuse who know how much gas will cost in 5 months

will the mercury battery work in the buick? id just swap the batterys over every couple weeks if you dont wanna buy a tender

rodents wont be able to get any further then the catolitic converters ...humidity will be low up there in minnesota so i wouldn't worry about rings or anything rusting that quick , block it if you want , id be more concerned with blocking off the air intake then anything as rodents WILL go there , or spiders , or whatever and block up the air filter. but dont remove the air filter or youll have issues with the critters and the mass air sensor ...10 bucks for a filter , 200 for a sensor

Submariner409
11-04-12, 08:59 PM
What is a battery tender?

Post #4, Para. 2, second sentence. Available anywhere - hook it up, plug it in and forget it. They're "smart" and will not overcharge a battery while maintaining voltage at 12.8 to 13.1 VDC. Remember: a discharged battery freezes solid and bursts at 30 degrees.

Jesda
11-04-12, 09:11 PM
For just a 3-4 month season, you don't need to worry about doing much more than starting it every 2 weeks, letting it warm up, giving it a couple revs, and shutting it down, and I park my cars outside under a carport.

I have a Carquest trickle charger I use for dead batteries but you probably don't even to go that far.



I like Luke's idea for keeping rats away.

CadillacCastle
11-06-12, 10:41 PM
and a tater to plug the tailpipe with and oh yea don't forget the dryer sheets everywhere. Use mothballs for that old persons car smell.

greencadillacmatt
11-07-12, 02:28 AM
I used dryer sheets in the Challenger, and Irish Spring Soap (cut up small and put on little paper plates) in the '84 DeVille. I've never had any mice problems with either car. I think I like the dryer sheets better, just because your car smells fresh in the spring, and not soapy.

thebigjimsho
11-07-12, 11:54 AM
My V had a cover, Sta-bil, a full tank and a battery tender. If you can get it in the air, that's good but for 4 months at a time the tires will be fine.

Aron9000
11-07-12, 06:23 PM
I wouldn't bother with a cover if its in a garage. Just go out there every week and dust it off with your california car duster. Or just let the dust sit and wash it off in the spring. I'd maybe bother with a cover if you're in a really tight garage where you will have to brush up against the car to walk around it.

jayoldschool
11-07-12, 07:32 PM
For just a 3-4 month season, you don't need to worry about doing much more than starting it every 2 weeks, letting it warm up, giving it a couple revs, and shutting it down, and I park my cars outside under a carport.

I have a Carquest trickle charger I use for dead batteries but you probably don't even to go that far.



I like Luke's idea for keeping rats away.

You shouldn't start it at all. Just wears the engine, and builds up moisture. Wait until spring, start it up, and drive.

gary88
11-07-12, 07:36 PM
I wouldn't bother with a cover if its in a garage. Just go out there every week and dust it off with your california car duster. Or just let the dust sit and wash it off in the spring. I'd maybe bother with a cover if you're in a really tight garage where you will have to brush up against the car to walk around it.

You'd be surprised how much dust can accumulate in a seemingly clean garage.

thebigjimsho
11-07-12, 08:27 PM
You shouldn't start it at all. Just wears the engine, and builds up moisture. Wait until spring, start it up, and drive.

I believe that was Jesda humor...

----------


I wouldn't bother with a cover if its in a garage. Just go out there every week and dust it off with your california car duster. Or just let the dust sit and wash it off in the spring. I'd maybe bother with a cover if you're in a really tight garage where you will have to brush up against the car to walk around it.

I stored mine in someone's huge garage with a few other cars. Just added peace of mind...

HAZZARDJOHN
11-08-12, 10:04 PM
Use a car cover and throw away your california car scratcher! Ask Randy about those and laugh. I would buy a high quality car cover the softer the better. The cheap walmart ones are hard on paint. Buy an indoor only one as you don't need rain protection just dust protection. We are going to get my... I mean your Marauder Buffed and Zaino'ed in the spring.

http://www.empirecovers.com/detail.aspx?p=EMPS&v=EMPSR4&source=search&gclid=CIXT1ZvzwLMCFc5cMgodaTYABA

^ Not recommending these but something similar

basscatt
11-08-12, 11:32 PM
Hey everyone,

Looking to store my Marauder soon. I've got a 3 car garage at home, so I don't need to store it offsite somewhere. I'm just wondering what I'll need to do before I put it in dry-dock for the winter.

Should I leave the tank about half full? I plan on starting it a couple times a month, just to get the juices flowing and keep the engine's seals lubricated. It won't be going anywhere, just idling in the garage.

Because I'll be starting it fairly often, do I need to put a stabilizer in the fuel?

Is there anything else I'm missing?
----------------------------------------
I plan on starting it a couple times a month,
just to get the juices flowing and keep the engine's seals lubricated.
It won't be going anywhere, just idling in the garage.

that is the WORST thing to do -

change the oil -
you don't want dirty contaminated acidic oil sitting in the oil pan -

put the proper amount of STA-BIL in the gas tank then fill it up -
then run the engine for several minutes -
to be sure the STA-BIL has gone through the injectors -
a full gas tank will not allow condensation to form -

turn the heat control all the way to COLD -
turn the climate control system OFF -
this should close the blend doors - the recirculation door - and mode doors -

connect a battery maintainer -
this will keep the battery charged -
and prevent it from freezing -

put SEVERAL mousetraps in the cabin - under the hood - in the trunk - and around the car -
use BOTH snap-traps and glue-traps - but glue traps don't stay very sticky when cold -
bait them with peanutbutter -

roll ALL the windows UP -

put a "dust cover" over the car -

do NOT start the motor during storage -
it will actually do more harm than good -
the car will never completely warm up sitting and idling -

Jesda
11-09-12, 12:04 AM
You shouldn't start it at all. Just wears the engine, and builds up moisture. Wait until spring, start it up, and drive.

That's bad for gaskets and seals.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
11-09-12, 09:54 AM
Well, I've still got a few things to do before it's stored for winter, but we're coming close.

John, yes I know the damage that the California Car Duster car do.....tiny swirl marks, everywhere...
I'm not paying $185 for a car cover though, let's be more reasonable.

The oil only has maybe 2500 miles on it, but I should change that before it's stored. The local Ford store (Tousley) recommends every 5000 miles, but I paid for an oil change package....3 oil changes & tire rotations in a year for $60, so I'll due that next Friday, when I've got time.

I need to fill up the tank and throw in some sta-bil and let it get up to the injectors.

The car is fairly clean, but I should give it another wash & hand dry before it's stored for good & vacuum out the interior as well.

Throw some dryer sheets inside the cabin, trunk & engine compartment. I've never had a mouse problem in that garage before, so I don't need to go apeshit with mouse traps.

Submariner409
11-09-12, 09:58 AM
FWIW I used to prepare and store one of 5 different cars during 100 day missile submarine deployments over about 16 years - 100 days gone, 100 days home, so 2 storages per year. Sometimes I had a car port, sometimes not (and good covers are not cheap). I used the prep methods that I have posted in CF several times - and have NEVER has a gasket, seal, oil, coolant, gasoline or transmission leak or problem.

The engineering theory behind "prepare it and let it sit" is based on the fact that an idling engine NEVER warms up enough to boil off moisture and acid contaminants in the engine oil (if any), the intake system, and the exhaust system (yes, stainless steel helps here) - the very process of idling an engine for long periods is what builds up these contaminants - long drives, preferably at highway speeds is what heats, boils, and washes everything touched by lube oil inside the engine. You do the oil change and fuel prep, drive 25 miles, come home and put it away. Also, a school of thought says that synthetic oils stay on and in metal surfaces and bearings longer than synthetics under storage - therefore the caution to use synthetic oil and an oil stabilizer intended for vehicle storage, NOT one of the snake oil "stabilizers" that litter the parts store shelves. Long term engine storage oil stabilizer ??? Look in the West Marine site for both oil and gasoline stabilizers - www.westmarine.com (http://www.westmarine.com) - enter "oil stabilizer" in the search box. Cheaper in the store than online.

Here's one example (of hundreds) of a "battery minder" - very, very good piece of gear to have......... also at large parts stores ..........

http://www.batterysales.com/batteryminder.cfm

HAZZARDJOHN
11-09-12, 02:48 PM
I thought 185 for a car cover was cheap. Either way get a breathable indoor cover. Do not buy a fitted tarp like walmart or Pep Boys sells.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
11-09-12, 04:17 PM
Why does it have to be breathable?

Submariner409
11-09-12, 04:48 PM
Because, with a plastic/rubber/impervious car cover the car sits in a condensation bath 24/7/365. Put a clear plastic bag over your hand, hold it closed at the wrist and walk out into cool air. What happens to the inside of that bag is what happens to your car - as if it were in that bag.

orconn
11-09-12, 04:56 PM
I believe in car covers for both inside and outside storage. For inside storage, a breathable car cover not only keeps the dust off the finish it also provides a minimal barrier against inadvertent things that might fall on the car accidentally. A breathable outside cover not only protects against ultra violet rays but also gives some protection against debris. It is absolutely necessary, in either case that the cover be "breathable!"

jayoldschool
11-09-12, 06:41 PM
That's bad for gaskets and seals.

Maybe if you store a car for a couple of years, but not for the winter. I've been storing my cars every year for 25 years. Park the car, take the battery out, bring it inside. Charge it every couple of months, or, put a good trickle on it (battery tender or CTEK). That's it. Don't start the car.

thebigjimsho
11-09-12, 07:08 PM
Well, I've still got a few things to do before it's stored for winter, but we're coming close.

John, yes I know the damage that the California Car Duster car do.....tiny swirl marks, everywhere...
I'm not paying $185 for a car cover though, let's be more reasonable.

The oil only has maybe 2500 miles on it, but I should change that before it's stored. The local Ford store (Tousley) recommends every 5000 miles, but I paid for an oil change package....3 oil changes & tire rotations in a year for $60, so I'll due that next Friday, when I've got time.

I need to fill up the tank and throw in some sta-bil and let it get up to the injectors.

The car is fairly clean, but I should give it another wash & hand dry before it's stored for good & vacuum out the interior as well.

Throw some dryer sheets inside the cabin, trunk & engine compartment. I've never had a mouse problem in that garage before, so I don't need to go apeshit with mouse traps.

I always buy the Motorcraft oil and filters at WalMart. Cheep cheep.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
11-09-12, 07:57 PM
OK, so I've gotta buy a breathable car cover. Is a Marauder an unusually large car, or should most car covers fit it?

orconn
11-09-12, 08:03 PM
Car covers come in specific sizes to fit your specific car.

MattHatlee
11-16-12, 08:32 AM
Well for my car since it is my daily driver I want to keep it out of the snow, but my garage is packed to the ceiling...so within the next couple weeks I have to build a open ended pavilion like structure to park my car under. I have a lot of work in store for me. Ha

Submariner409
11-16-12, 10:29 AM
Take a look at some of the tube frame structures in a commercial nursery equipment site or Northern Tool. Don't go cheap - snow loads for you can be pretty heavy.