: 12 Cars That Define Cadillac At Age 110



hulksdaddy
10-06-12, 06:08 PM
http://autos.yahoo.com/news/12-cars-that-define-cadillac-at-age-110-.html

Kluch
10-06-12, 09:07 PM
Nice read. Thanks for the post. No way a 59 eldorado belongs in the bottom five. I lso think Escalade shold have been in the top 5. Alante could have made both lists for various reaons.

garfin
10-06-12, 10:17 PM
All well and good- BUT - not to have the '49 Cadillac on this list with its ground-breaking and industry-leading 331 CID OHV V8 is a sin.

The '49 Caddy is a milestone car, without any doubt. That overhead valve V8 (with Ed Cole involved in its development) produced 160 HP. Yup... only 10 HP more than the engine it replaced - a 346 CID flathead V8 that weighed 200 lbs. more and was no where near as fuel efficient. That old flathead V8 had reached its development and power limits while the new engine was designed to accept displacement increases that saw it get to 500 CID by the mid-70's.

Briggs Cunningham ran a pair of them in the 24 Hours of Le Mans in '49. As well, English racer Sydney Allard bought these new Cadillac engines to power his Allard J-2/J-2X sports cars.

The icing on the cake is that this pioneering engine design was the forefather of the Chevrolet small block, (hello again, and thank you, Ed Cole) the basic design of which is still very much in the forefront of engine design today, based on its simplicity and efficiency. Our V's LSA is a direct descendant.

Best regards,

Elie

M5eater
10-06-12, 10:45 PM
Great read!


As for Garfin's comment,

I don't know too much about Cadillac's past (yet) but by the sound of what you're saying, it indeed seems like a giant milestone.

However,
1) this is popular mechanics we're talking about

and

2) was the 49 Cadillac anything special without it's engine? An engine alone does not make a great car, no matter how great said engine is.

MacBuster
10-06-12, 10:58 PM
Great read!


As for Garfin's comment,

I don't know too much about Cadillac's past (yet) but by the sound of what you're saying, it indeed seems like a giant milestone.

However,
1) this is popular mechanics we're talking about

and

2) was the 49 Cadillac anything special without it's engine? An engine alone does not make a great car, no matter how great said engine is.

That sounds like a challenge. :)

garfin
10-07-12, 10:28 AM
Great read!


As for Garfin's comment,

I don't know too much about Cadillac's past (yet) but by the sound of what you're saying, it indeed seems like a giant milestone.

However,
1) this is popular mechanics we're talking about

and

2) was the 49 Cadillac anything special without it's engine? An engine alone does not make a great car, no matter how great said engine is.

Good points, M5eater!

I don't believe there is a simple answer to your question, but I'll take a shot at it. From a styling perspective, the '48 model is actually more significant because it was the first new post-war design for Cadillac (first use of tail fins as well). Up to and including the 1947 models, Cadillac continued to use the tooling for the '41-'42 models (the '41 and '47 models were virtually the same).
So there are only a few minor styling details that distinguish the '48 and '49 models in general. For the most part, they are extremely difficult to tell apart unless you know what to look for.

However, there is one HUGE exception (other than the engine) that does set the '49 model miles apart from the '48. For 1949, GM introduced ground-breaking new styling with the new Series 62 Coupe de Ville. This was the 1st pillarless coupe, or "hardtop convertible". Only 2150 units of this model were produced. Its standout feature (other than being pillarless) was its large wraparound three-piece rear window and simulated top bows inside under the roof. The styling of this new pillarless couple set the trend for the 50's that others would follow, as would that new OHV V8. Buick (Riviera) and Oldsmobile (Holiday) also had versions of this pillarless coupe design. Actually, the '49 Cadillac won Motor Trend's very first "Car of the Year" award.

http://www.classiccarmania.com/ClassicCarGallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=4243&g2_serialNumber=4

With respect to your comment about this being "Popular Mechanics", they really didn't get it wrong when they put the '48 on that list... since the styling had such significance. The Milestone Car Society of California, which honors the crème de la crème of postwar cars, has bestowed "Certified Milestone Car" status on the following models for 1949: Sixty-One Sedanet; Sixty-Two Sedanet, Convertible, and Coupe de Ville; Sixty Special; Seventy-Five Sedan/Limousine.

Best regards,

Elie