: 1966 Jeep Wagoneer for sale caught my eye



Jesda
09-07-12, 01:13 PM
http://jesda.com/2012/09/07/classic-for-sale-1966-jeep-wagoneer-2500/

http://jesda.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/wpid-IMG_20120907_081410-2012-09-7-11-28.jpg
http://jesda.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/wpid-IMG_20120907_081450-2012-09-7-11-28.jpg
http://jesda.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/wpid-IMG_20120907_081542-2012-09-7-11-28.jpg

For sale at a Mopar dealer for $2500. 45,000 miles.

orconn
09-07-12, 01:36 PM
That Wagoneer must be one of the first model years .... pre Renault, pre Chrysler.... a real oldie, but goody(?)!

Stingroo
09-07-12, 01:37 PM
Y U NO BUY?!


That's kinda cool.

Rolex
09-07-12, 02:20 PM
The body looks solid and it's all original. That would be a labor of love, but a really cool SUV to own.

orconn
09-07-12, 02:38 PM
I just wonder how the steering paint wheel got so worn in on;ly 45,000 miles?

hueterm
09-07-12, 03:54 PM
No....No...

No.

drewsdeville
09-07-12, 06:13 PM
"While classic cars tend to look best in lustrous layers of fresh clearcoat, classic trucks take pride in their natural age."

Win.

I think this also carries over into certain types of cars. Muscle cars and performance cars of the past look great restored, but I prefer family sedans and other "average, everyday" cars in their natural-aged state.

Park two vintage Impalas next to each other, one restored, the other natural, and I'll probably completely ignore the restored. I look at the natural aged car and imagine the miles the car has seen up to that point - the families it hauled, the dads it took to work, the vacations it's been on, and the overwhelming number if places it's been. Every scratch and dent, a cracked window, worn drivers seat, broken rear view mirror - they are all part of a story. Once the car has been molested (fixed/restored) by someone, it all disappears and becomes uninteresting - just some other guy's project - all hints at the car's past permanently erased, unavailable to other's imaginations.

brandondeleo
09-07-12, 06:59 PM
I LIKE IT.

Buy it.

hueterm
09-07-12, 07:37 PM
N.n.n.no.

Rolex
09-07-12, 07:47 PM
N.n.n.no.

What are you trying to tell him?? :p

Aron9000
09-07-12, 08:24 PM
Drew's got the right idea, I wouldn't restore that truck, just fix any mechanical issues and drive it(just not when there is salt on the road though). If the body has any rust issues, I'd take care of them, but I wouldn't paint it or replate the chrome or anything like that.

Personally I've never seen a Wagoneer that old, all the ones I've seen have been 70's/80's models with the fake wood sides.

Jesda
09-07-12, 10:51 PM
Every scratch and dent, a cracked window, worn drivers seat, broken rear view mirror - they are all part of a story. Once the car has been molested (fixed/restored) by someone, it all disappears and becomes uninteresting - just some other guy's project - all hints at the car's past permanently erased, unavailable to other's imaginations.

I'm inclined to agree. I've seen hundreds of restored classics at car shows but I'll never forget the 1950s Mercury I saw pulling up to a pet store in Spokane, WA. It was rust-free (as cars in the PNW tend to be) but appeared to be in daily-driven condition with a somewhat faded paint job, a few dents, and a couple missing wheel covers. It didn't look junky at all, just routinely driven.

77CDV
09-07-12, 11:00 PM
Dirt simple and dead reliable. I'd rock it! :thumbsup: