: Neil Armstrong has passed away.



CadillacLuke24
08-26-12, 02:16 AM
He was 82. He died due to complications from acardiovascular procedures earlier this month.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/26/science/space/neil-armstrong-dies-first-man-on-moon.html?_r=1

:tearflag:

Rest in Peace buddy. You will not soon be forgotten.

brandondeleo
08-26-12, 04:58 AM
:helpless:

orconn
08-26-12, 03:24 PM
From what I've heard Neil Armstrong was a great guy and very typical of the pilot engineers that piloted our early space flights. Most all of us will remember Neil Armstrong for his famous words upon stepping on the the Moons surface.

I think, knowing the breed, that he and the other astronauts would also pay tribute to all the other dedicated engineers and scientist, still living and deceased, that made a handful of American and other nation's astronauts flights in space possible. For like so many successful endeavors under taken in the Twentieth Century depth of knowledge and teamwork carried the day.

So while I feel sad at the loss of a great American, I also remember all those unsung men and women who made the seeming impossible possible!

vincentm
08-26-12, 05:07 PM
So while I feel sad at the loss of a great American, I also remember all those unsung men and women who made the seeming impossible possible!


:yeah:

truckinman
08-26-12, 06:45 PM
I grew up 30 minutes from his home town. Has a great museum there and everything. It's a shame to hear about it.


R.I.P.

talismandave
08-27-12, 02:13 AM
I grew up watching the beginning of space travel. As a child I was in awe of the men who would take the great risks to do what they did. When I got older and saw the actual spaceships up close, how small and fragile they looked, my awe grew. That will never be diminished. Now that I am even older I, as with Orconn, have a new respect for all the people behind the scenes.

I also have a hard time when I think that as I was watching and revering the heroes on the moon, other heroes were dying by the thousands in a war, complete with nightly "killed" tallies on the evening news, as if it were a sporting event.

In the end they were all great members of our military who were doing the seemingly impossible under the worst imaginable conditions, and all deserve our respect and admiration.
R.I.P. and God's speed.

Jesda
08-27-12, 03:34 AM
None of us will ever be as awesome as Neil Armstrong and his crew. RIP.

ShapeShifter
08-27-12, 12:07 PM
Those guys were 20th Century Pioneers. Bless him and his family.

brandondeleo
08-27-12, 12:08 PM
http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc7/431553_442862472433138_755251711_n.jpg

talismandave
08-27-12, 01:53 PM
http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc7/431553_442862472433138_755251711_n.jpg
Not counting Grissom, Chaffee, and White.

orconn
08-27-12, 02:04 PM
^^^ Let us not forget that the American and Soviet accomplishments in space were stimulated and moved forward by the "Cold War." The very real "Space Race" was just one component of all the highly costly research and development that took place during the 1950's through the 1970's. The development of aerospace endeavors and accomplishment was primarily the result of the effort and treasure put into the conflict between "The West" and the "Soviet Block" and the necessity seen by both sides of defeating the other's ideology and military superiority.

The civilian byproducts of the technological and military conflict have been many and became main contributors to the economic growth of the United States and the Free World in the 1980's and '90s. However, the "Space Race" was every bit a military part of the "Cold War" as was the Vietnam war and other "hot" conflicts around the world where he "Super Powers" faced off against each other.

So much of our communications abilities that we enjoy today really were a result of the need for faster more efficient worldwide communication and the surveillance of that communication that made the rapid deployment of military might to counter act military and political aggressions put forth by the opposing sides.

The fact that space exploration, intelligence capabilities (of all kinds), medical and other scientific knowledge were enhanced and thrust forward by the needs of the competition that was the "Cold War" cannot be underestimated. Eisenhower was well aware of what lay ahead when he warned of the "Military-Industrial Complex."

Today's parsimonious attitude toward taxes and the will to pay for technological progress has already spelled the end of the "Space Program" as we have known and benefited by it. But because of private capital's unwillingness to invest in or directly in any projects without near term profit potential we have, as a nation been falling behind in the development of new technologies and seem currently unwilling to to take the risks necessary in making scientific and technological break throughs.

CadillacLuke24
08-27-12, 06:04 PM
:yeah: Teflon, GPS, Cell phones, Li-ion batteries, etc.

To lighten things up, go grab your cell phone.

That bad boy has more computing power than ALL of NASA in 1969.

NASA got man to the moon.

Your phone can get you to the local planetarium, where you can learn about the moon.

:D

cadillac kevin
08-27-12, 07:14 PM
:yeah: Teflon, GPS, Cell phones, Li-ion batteries, etc.

To lighten things up, go grab your cell phone.

That bad boy has more computing power than ALL of NASA in 1969.

NASA got man to the moon.

Your phone can get you to the local planetarium, where you can learn about the moon.

:D

I'll take a glass of powdered orange drink :)

gary88
08-27-12, 10:28 PM
RIP :(

http://img214.imageshack.us/img214/2650/dq0jy.jpg

Jesda
08-28-12, 01:23 AM
Jesus christ :histeric:

ShapeShifter
08-28-12, 10:48 AM
Things That Make You Go :hmm: