: Off topic but relevant, Spend more time with your kids, pull the plug



deckofficer
08-02-12, 05:26 PM
Tired of being a working stiff? When you left for work this morning your daughter was practicing her ABCs, upon return she was on a date with Bruno. If you can stand the idea of selling everything, house, cars, toys, club memberships, maybe the laid back, world cruising lifestyle is for you. I did this in my late 30's, enjoyed it so much went back to school at the California Maritime Academy to make it a profession, and now that I have retired, looking forward to going back to sea again, but not for work.

Here is a link to a family of 5 that has been cruising for the last 3 years. Some of you might enjoy it, some of you might just have a light bulb click on and say "That is what I want for the family". Feel free to comment on the thread http://tbuckets.lefora.com/2012/07/30/a-sa-cruising-familys-adventures-aboard-their-cat-/ or if you don't want to join, comment here instead.

You will probably eat better and spend less.......
http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff452/deckofficer/SV%20TRIBE/IMG_0754.jpg

http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff452/deckofficer/SV%20TRIBE/IMG_0055.jpg

Bob

Jesda
08-02-12, 06:42 PM
It's amazing to think of the lobster as highly desirable food. Someone somewhere must have been starving to want to crack open a giant insect! Same goes for crab.

They do look delicious when cooked though.

orconn
08-02-12, 06:52 PM
Lobster used to be "garbage" food, they used to feed it to prisoners in New England. They fed so much lobster that the prisoners used to complain their heads off about having to eat them.

Today, on the West Coast, Rock Crab are considered "garbage seafood" and very few non Latinos eat this crab. However, if you have ever had the opportunity to eat Rock Crab (pretty much the same as Rock Crab in Florida) you may find you will like it better than the much cherished Dungeness Crab. You'd have to go to a restaurant or fish market that caters primarily to a Latino clientèle to be able to try it.

It's great to spend time with your kids, but it's not necessary to isolate them on the briny to do it!

Nice Mahi Mahi by the way!

Jesda
08-02-12, 06:55 PM
I have a hard time preparing mahi mahi without drying it out. It's one delicious but challenging fish.

orconn
08-02-12, 07:04 PM
I've only had Mahi Mahi in the Islands, never tried the frozen stuff you get on the Mainland. I would think Mahi Mahi was approaching "endangered" status as popular as it was a few years back! I am not sure that what passes for Mahi Mahi in Mainland supermarkets and chain restaurant is really Mahi Mahi anyway. I try to stick with more plentiful varieties of ocean fish, when I have fish to eat.

Fortunately, Maine lobster has been plentiful for the last few years, as has blue crab from the Mid Atlantic.

Submariner409
08-02-12, 07:22 PM
Most of the "lobster tails" you buy in grocery stores are from small langouste (the "spiny lobster" the boy is holding). You get a langouste that size and let your finger stray into the tail flex joints and it WILL remove your finger as neatly as a scalpel. You pull them out of the reef hole by the antennae.

The blue crab is a much sought-after Chesapeake Bay delicacy, often in medium to short supply over the past 15 years. A moratorium on Virginia draggers scraping for egg-laden female crabs buried in the winter mud south of Smith Point has replenished the stock somewhat.

The "drop out and sail" theory is fun - but you had better be ready and have a pretty decent outside income source. It is NOT all wine and roses.

deckofficer, Click on my username and read my profile.

(Master of Steam and Motor vessels to 1600 gross tons, upon oceans. 100 ton Auxiliary Sail endorsement. Necessary Radar, Celestial, Marine Firefighting (Texas A&M) and CPR endorsements. Renewed for convenience last 6 years)

deckofficer
08-02-12, 08:42 PM
Nice to meet a fellow mariner. I had a hunch that I would on this forum vs the hot rod forums I also belong to. I have my Unlimited Tonnage Open Ocean along with a BS in Marine Transportation. Grad of CMA. It is a good life at sea, will be going with a Chris White design catamaran next time out, former boat was an old Cal 40 race boat that I matched the purchase price out fitting for cruising.

orconn,

When you cruise as a family on a cat, it is very social, not isolating for the kids, as your boat is the meeting place for other cruising kids.
http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff452/deckofficer/SV%20TRIBE/IMG_0700.jpg

VS. a monohull for room.
http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff452/deckofficer/SV%20TRIBE/IMG_0890.jpg

CIWS
08-02-12, 09:29 PM
Our waters were polluted by BPs oil well. I wouldn't eat crap out of there.


I did 6 in the Navy and a little over 4 on the same Frigate. No great desire yet to return to the sea.

deckofficer
08-02-12, 10:02 PM
Our waters were polluted by BPs oil well. I wouldn't eat crap out of there.


I did 6 in the Navy and a little over 4 on the same Frigate. No great desire yet to return to the sea.

Not even on your terms and boat?

CIWS
08-02-12, 10:43 PM
Not even on your terms and boat?

That may come with time. But not in the foreseeable future.

I went back out on a fishing charter in 03 while on a trip to Cancun. Myself and the crew were the only ones not puking over the side. That just left more beer and fishing for me. :)


http://www.ciws.info/coronafishing.jpg

OffThaHorseCEO
08-03-12, 12:22 AM
I'm actually interested in getting off of land myself, but in the other way.

I've been intrigued lately by the idea of flying. Flight school is very expensive but seems like it would be worth it (for a private pilot license with endorsements at least).

Sailing comes a close second though!

deckofficer
08-03-12, 12:34 AM
The new Sport Plane license cuts the cost of a Private by quite a bit. When I was more active, on a hot day I would rent one of club planes and climb to 12,500 just to hang out at reduced throttle with wind screen vents wide open for all that cool, clean air. The club had some old planes that they charged us on tach time, but for your log you would use hobbs, pay for one hour, if throttled back enough, fly and log 2.

OffThaHorseCEO
08-03-12, 01:27 AM
Hadnt seen that

What restrictions does that place on the type and size of craft you can pilot

Sorry to hijack, this is supposed to be about sailing

MrHolland
08-03-12, 01:59 AM
I am completely ignorant of what you are suggesting, but would like to understand. To recap, sell everything you own, buy a big boat and cruise around the world. As mentioned earlier, I know nothing about this. How is this lifestyle possible?? How does it end, when one runs out of money? What would be a good amount of money to begin with and how long could someone expect it to last. When the money runs out, what to do next, sell the boat and live wherever you landed? How do you eat, get clothes, clean the clothes and yourself? This is something that someone would see on TV and never believe it possible. I'm certainly not opposed to such a lifestyle, but my wife, I'm sure it would be a very tough sell. I am in no way mocking you or your idea, but rather genuinely curious.

OffThaHorseCEO
08-03-12, 02:15 AM
I wouldnt call it permanent, the kids eventually have to go to school, or they eventually grow up and have to work.

As for bathing and laundry, im sure the boats have some kind of plumbing system. The food you catch and cook yourself.

I dint think id personally make a permanent life of it, but if i really had the money, id try it for a year or so

deckofficer
08-03-12, 02:53 AM
I am completely ignorant of what you are suggesting, but would like to understand. To recap, sell everything you own, buy a big boat and cruise around the world. As mentioned earlier, I know nothing about this. How is this lifestyle possible?? How does it end, when one runs out of money? What would be a good amount of money to begin with and how long could someone expect it to last. When the money runs out, what to do next, sell the boat and live wherever you landed? How do you eat, get clothes, clean the clothes and yourself? This is something that someone would see on TV and never believe it possible. I'm certainly not opposed to such a lifestyle, but my wife, I'm sure it would be a very tough sell. I am in no way mocking you or your idea, but rather genuinely curious.

I have friends that are cruising on a $1000 a month budget. If you own your boat outright, then no insurance payments. Speaking of which, no need to carry health insurance either, as all other countries your able to afford major surgery unlike here in the States. Laura Dekker who left home as a 14 year old, completed a solo circumnavigation by 16 and is now 1/2 around again in the South Pacific. She was born on her parents's boat and cruised the first 7 years of her life. We have a forum for cruisers, The Cruiser's Forum and I have about 2000 posts there. If interested http://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/ and my own cruising/hot rod forum http://tbuckets.lefora.com/forum/category/sailboat-cruisers-forum-sailboat-cruisers-forum-topics/

When I cruised 30 years ago it was before GPS, Internet, and Weather FAX. Today, cruising is more mainstream because the two big scary unknowns, where am I and where is the weather is just a push of a button away. I used a sextant back then and HAM SSB HF radio to stay in touch with other cruisers.

Bob

deckofficer
08-03-12, 03:06 AM
Hadnt seen that

What restrictions does that place on the type and size of craft you can pilot

Sorry to hijack, this is supposed to be about sailing

http://www.sportpilot.org/

deckofficer
08-03-12, 03:09 AM
http://www.sportpilot.org/

I have my Private, but with the Sport Plane license no IFR or night , just daytime recreational flying out of smaller airports.

MrHolland
08-03-12, 03:51 AM
Very interesting. Maybe Id be better off trying to keep my wife gainfully employed and I could run off and cruise the world!!

CIWS
08-03-12, 08:55 AM
To recap, sell everything you own, buy a big boat and cruise around the world. As mentioned earlier, I know nothing about this. How is this lifestyle possible?? How does it end, when one runs out of money? What would be a good amount of money to begin with and how long could someone expect it to last. When the money runs out, what to do next, sell the boat and live wherever you landed? How do you eat, get clothes, clean the clothes and yourself?

Hopefully you're planning for your retirement ? The very questions you've posted here are the exact same ones anyone should be asking about their future. Because sooner or later you will not be able to really work any longer either by age, physical condition, illness, or even worse an economy that goes into the toilet and there is no real work. Financial planning is supposed to be about planning for that future when this occurs. We hope it's within the guidelines we've planned for and we reach a point where the funds we've set aside and/or invested are now sufficient to sustain us based on the future lifestyle we've chosen and budgeted for. How much do you need ? That's answered by the kind of lifestyle you want to live under and roughly how much you will require per month to live that way. There are lots of financial planning calculators out there online to run the numbers. Here's a link to one set. http://www.choosetosave.org/ballpark/

OffThaHorseCEO
08-03-12, 01:17 PM
I have my Private, but with the Sport Plane license no IFR or night , just daytime recreational flying out of smaller airports.

Ah ok, those are pretty big restrictions...

Maybe it would be worth it to start with sport, study and practice then go for private

Submariner409
08-03-12, 01:35 PM
You still need the flight instruction and ground school time for Private, and nowadays, instructors don't come cheap.

It was a bit different in '61 - I owned a '45 Piper J-3, #N42592 - 80/87 avgas was $0.27 a gallon and grass field tie down was $5 a month. Poor old girl is in Oklahoma somewhere now, no airworthiness certificate.

deckofficer
08-03-12, 01:52 PM
Better than feeding a pair of R985's. 5 times the displacement of my little Track-T.
http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff452/deckofficer/DSC011211536x1152.jpg

Submariner409
08-03-12, 02:01 PM
Good ol' Twin Beech

CIWS
08-03-12, 02:27 PM
Good ol' Twin Beech

Hey now, don't be calling his plane a Beech. . .

http://www.ciws.net/smiles/wink.gif

deckofficer
08-03-12, 03:28 PM
But it is, most on other forums guess wrong. Can count on the CTS-V group to get it right. You just can't see the tail from this angle or the above picture.
http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff452/deckofficer/DSC011201014x760.jpg

Submariner409
08-03-12, 03:57 PM
Flew one for Joe Fugere and New London Air Taxi out of Waterford, CT from '62 - '64. Sort of like flying a giant J-3 (with power) or a small DC-3. Taildraggers are fun..........:sneaky:......... it sat in the grass next to 2 Apaches - not bad aircraft in their own right, either.

In the first picture the vertical stabilizers are blended with the wheel well doors.

deckofficer
08-03-12, 04:06 PM
Sub409, I was going to say you have a good eye, but since you flown one, you know what you are looking for. Did the one you fly have the hot rod upgrade to the R985s? Makes a good plane even better, sporty even.

Submariner409
08-03-12, 04:32 PM
Sub409, I was going to say you have a good eye, but since you flown one, you know what you are looking for. Did the one you fly have the hot rod upgrade to the R985s? Makes a good plane even better, sporty even.

Same engines, but if I remember, that one had the 3-blade Hartzell airscrews. Joe got it from an outfit near Deer Park, L.I.

orconn
08-03-12, 04:48 PM
You must have had very tolerant neighbors! Or was that why you took to the high seas?

Obviously you have dabbled in many of life's pleasures! I hope you continue to enjoy them all.

deckofficer
08-03-12, 05:19 PM
The entire neighborhood flys, it is Cameron Air Park Estates off of hwy 50 near Placerville, Ca.
http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff452/deckofficer/DSC011221536x1152.jpg

http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff452/deckofficer/DSC011261014x760.jpg

http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff452/deckofficer/DSC011281536x1152.jpg

talismandave
08-03-12, 10:29 PM
Very cool, great photos and interesting stories! Thank you.

vincentm
08-04-12, 12:29 AM
The entire neighborhood flys, it is Cameron Air Park Estates off of hwy 50 near Placerville, Ca.
http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff452/deckofficer/DSC011221536x1152.jpg

http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff452/deckofficer/DSC011261014x760.jpg

http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff452/deckofficer/DSC011281536x1152.jpg

I know Placerville, born and raised Sacramento native here

talismandave
08-04-12, 01:25 AM
I love the street signs!:histeric:

Submariner409
08-04-12, 09:54 AM
Google "kentmorr air park 3w3 kent island maryland". A grass strip, due E and W, bordered with homes, each with its attached hangar. The west end of the runway is the Chesapeake Bay. Nice place to land, and there's a good seafood restaurant a block's walk away.

deckofficer
08-04-12, 12:31 PM
There is something inviting about a grass strip, combined with water and no trees at the ends.

Submariner409
08-04-12, 02:40 PM
.......... and it was there one hell of a lot earlier than any of the houses on final........... A local judge has already told two "come here's", complaining about light aircraft, that they failed to do their homework, so TS.

I kept the J-3, and later, a Colt, at College Park for a while in '62 - '63 and dropped in to Kentmorr a LOT. Another interesting grass strip was out at Deep Creek Lake, NW MD. You landed SE, going up and around the mountain. Wind be damned, you took off downhill, and flying straight and level 50 feet off the ground you were already at 2,500 feet barometric.

deckofficer
08-04-12, 03:14 PM
Short fields have never been a problem for me as I learned to fly on a 1900' paved runway. Density altitude was a different matter during my early flying. As a student pilot back then, I had a designated area set by my instructor that I could fly solo, but like instructor, so is the attitude of the student. On my first flight with him he had me taxi to the fuel pumps to top off the tanks. I had read the 150's owner manual before my first flight and asked "Won't that put us over gross?" His reply was he was glad I read the manual, but fill up anyway. I weigh 240 lb, he 280+. Because of his loose attitude, after my first solo and being now able to rack up some time on my own, I was also loose with the rules. I took my girlfriend (broke the rules there) to the South Lake Tahoe airport (another broken rule) on a hot summer day. Since I was suppose to be restricted to the Sacramento Valley, by pre-flight included full rich for mixture for take-off. I think you can see that I'm headed for disaster at an airport 6500' altitude and 88*, taking off into a box canyon surrounded by 9000'~11000' mountains. Take off was sluggish, rate of climb while flying straight was dismal. I was so close to stall speed I knew I wouldn't be able to turn without stalling and I was running out of room. Being a hot rodder, I thought I should play with the mixture to see if I could get a bit more performance from the engine. Boy was I relieved to get a lot more performance as I was leaning it out. I wasn't going to become a statistic this time, and my girlfriend never knew how close we got to buying the farm together on that take-off.

Submariner409
08-04-12, 04:34 PM
Hah ! When I bought the J-3 the mixture bellcrank was wired full rich. I installed my own pull cable to the dash and was able to milk a third of a gph out of the Continental at ~3500, but most of that plane's time was up and down the east coast - sea level work.

I know your 150 experience - on a hot August day with me, full gas, and Dad (6' 6", 255) along with a Speed Graphic camera out of College Park 270 over the RR right-of-way. Sort of like flying a 65 hp brick. (Back when CP was grass and had 2 X runways).

EDIT: here's an aerial of Waterford/New London Airport taken in '65. Where I bought the J-3 and Colt, learned to fly, and snake ranched from '60 - '64. My old plane is somewhere in that tiedown line in the grass. The airport is scraped to dirt and abandoned today: Nearby housing complaints and under-the-table money in Connecticut.