: Interesting sayings and their origins



CadillacLuke24
07-01-12, 06:39 PM
In our everyday lives, we come across some, at first glance, odd terms. They seem way offbeat and crazy for the saying, but make much more sense if we know the backstory or the culture. For example, my Gary Fisher Tarpon is the Cadillac of hardtail mountain bikes. You guys know that I mean it's the best there is. I thought it'd be entertaining to share a term that all - or none - of us would be familiar with, and explain the backstory. You know, good ol' CF banter :D

So, I present: Bought the farm.

I.e., Whitney Houston bought the farm earlier this year.

This term, referring to the death of an individual, dates back to the WWII era, with the earliest reference I could find being 1943. With fighter aircraft gaining speed and size, they were a sight to behold. When they crashed, they were a mess to behold as well. Unfortunately, pilots did perish from time to time. Concurrently, their aircraft would oftentimes plow up (no pun intended :D) a farmer's land, rendering it worthless if the crash occured at a particularly inoppertune time of the year. In order to survive, farmers often sought - and received - compensation from the government, many times the entirety of their mortgage. Having been a government employee, the pilot, in their passing, purchased a farm. Ergo, we get the saying.

So, which interesting ones do you guys know?

ShapeShifter
07-01-12, 10:41 PM
- Better to be tried by twelve, than carried by six.
Means in a life threatening situation, best to do them in and avoid your own funeral.…you will at least be alive for the court trial.

- Benny’s From Heaven!
Was an infidelity term. Supposedly how a wife explained the baby boy she presented to her military husband when he returned from 3 continuous years overseas. Believe it was a song popularized during WWII.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=TqdVa2G7RzI#!

Aron9000
07-02-12, 03:22 AM
I was always fond of this Mark Twain quote:

"It is better to keep your mouth closed and let people think you are a fool than to open it and remove all doubt." Heard this on the talk radio the other day about why you shouldn't take the witness stand in your own defense.

brandondeleo
07-02-12, 05:10 AM
Twenty-three (or twenty-two Orconn) Skidoo.

When the Flatiron Building was constructed at the turn of the century on the corner of 5th, Broadway, 22nd and 23rd (odd corner), it was so tall that it altered the wind patterns at the intersection, and it became known that the wind routed to 23rd street was strong enough to lift a woman's skirt. Skidoo!

The-Dullahan
07-02-12, 05:32 AM
Dead Ringer.

In the far eastern portion of Europe it was a commonplace tradition to place a foot pedal or a rope into a casket, where it could be buried in a sense as to allow it be activated and warn others that this buried individual was in fact alive. When you met someone who was shockingly similar in appearance to a deceased individual, he was quite clearly a "Dead Ringer" of them. Today this practice has been dropped, though in the right portions of Romania, it is still traditional to plant a bullet through the head of the deceased before burial. This helps control the possibility of accidental live burials as well as other regional problems from that particular place in the world. My sister from Transylvania insists Revenants are among the worst form of the undead.

Better yet, when you were buried alive and then managed to signal for help in this fashion, you were "Saved By The Bell." Which is a nice saying, considering that many of them did not have bells or such apparatus, and merely a large pipe that ran to the casket from the gravesite, allowing for one to call for help. In spite of the various tricks, such as adding curves or covers to these pipes, water still got in and if you have never had the privilege to smell what a waterlogged unembalmed human corpse smells like, you should probably get out into the REAL world a bit more and away from your fairytale urban life where everything is happiness, unicorns and sunshine and step into the darker reality that is still most of the world today.

Kicking the bucket.

when one is to hang themself, typically in a sixteenth century prison Great Britain the most corrupt kingdom in all of Christendom, where trying to plea anything other than guilty would only land you in more trouble, there is little they had access to to raise themselves to the rafters they intended to asphyxiate their own self from. One could however stand at the top of an upturned wash bucket or chamber pot tie the noose around their neck and kick the bucket from beneath their feet. This practice was also commonplace among those who were forced into the intense labours of servitude known to most as "slavery" though the elite of this time and the three centuries leading up to it would disagree. I believe the present-day wageslave's equal to this great hempen jig would be the men in Asia, particularly the China region who work in factories that tower over their cities and hurl themselves from the rooftops, through the skyline and the beams of the setting sun and into oblivion. The factories have tackled this with a simple solution: Nets around the buildings to catch their would-be-former-employees. While they do not solve the suicidal tendencies, they do however prevent this method. If you are ever able to bear witness to them, it is one of the most profoundly, deliciously morbid things you could see in a modern city.

Liars, scoundrels and especially Blasphemers would have their tongues cut from then and tossed into the streets in Medieval Europe, where the stray cats would eat them. Likewise, the Egyptians would sacrifice the tongues of blasphemers to the gods by giving them to cats. A phrase was struck from this and gained popularity when the Cat-O-Nine-Tails was used for flogging seafaring men into such pain that they would be left speechless. Thus it is for the Cat to have gotten your Tongue.

In the primitive battlefield hospitals from not-so-long-ago, when amputations were the only way to save the lives of some, who would be left limbless in turn from them, existed a phrase whispered in near-silence around military hospitals to refer to these men, who were carried on thatched stretchers or carrying devices. These men were of course, the original Basket Cases.

To Rack something, as in to strain it, such as racking your mind, is a term coined by Shakespeare (You would be amazed at how many modern-day phrases he invented and if you had the time it would take to research, absolutely shocked as to how many words in the English language he had invented himself) Of course, his inspiration to use the term in this fashion came directly from The Rack, which was a primitive, yet very effective torture device.

To carry a chip on your shoulder refers literally to a wood chip, placed there. To walk about doing this was one's way of trying to show how tough he was as were a fight about to start, people would take such wood chips and place them on their shoulder, as to dare their would-be opponent to knock the chip off then. This was a widely understood phrase, due to the practice of which it developed for many decades. There could well be Forum members here who personally have seen the origin in action. The present day equivalent is the "Come At Me Bro" stance, which is the most peculiar fighting style I can imagine. Most people say this with their arms stretched as far down as they can and their face leaning out towards their opponent. It does not take a martial artist of any degree to see the flaws in this style.

To Blow Hot And Cold comes from a poor traveler who had not the best manners for his host, who happened to be a God of the Frozen North. Confused by the man's actions after taking him in, he inquired of the traveler why he was blowing on his hands to be told he was warming them. The God, rather confused by this, figured out the man must mean to imply he is cold. He quickly had him seated and served a fine stew, which he took the first spoonful of and blew on it as well. After explaining angrily that he would not serve his guest cold soup and he needn't warm it as well, the man tried to explain he was blowing on it to chill it down. Again confused and perplexed by this, the man tried his best to explain, but his words fell to the floor as he was simply ordered out, for not being able to make up his mind (Either on blowing hot or cold or on whether or not his breath were hot or cold)

To pull one's leg originates from the Scottish and was used by peoples of Great Britain to imply exactly what we use it for today. While even then, mistaken by many to be a reference to tripping someone, as it is a good way to make them look foolish and feel confused all at once, the origins actually come from an old rhyme, which refers to tugging on the leg of an old woman who had been hung to make certain that she was dead.

To be honest, I could do this all day.

Submariner409
07-02-12, 10:27 AM
Another "Mark Twain" - If given the choice of gong to sea or going to jail, take jail. You meet a better class of people and there's less chance of drowning.

................. and if I get started on Navy and sailing jargon I'll be permabanned................

bigm57ict
07-02-12, 11:00 AM
I was always fond of this Mark Twain quote:

"It is better to keep your mouth closed and let people think you are a fool than to open it and remove all doubt." Heard this on the talk radio the other day about why you shouldn't take the witness stand in your own defense.

A similar quote, I believe attributed to Mark Twain also: "The attorney who represents himself in court has a fool for a client."

EDIT: After some searching, I found this quote attributed to Samuel Johnson.

Kad4Life
07-02-12, 11:22 AM
Another "Mark Twain" - If given the choice of gong to sea or gong to jail, take jail. You meet a better class of people and there's less chance of drowning.

................. and if I get started on Navy and sailing jargon I'll be permabanned................

Why, I am taken aback by your statement .
You could wind up at loggerheads with the mods over something like that ? ;) :D

Kad

Submariner409
07-02-12, 11:41 AM
Heh................ just because we're umpires doesn't mean we can't get banned from the league.........everyone plays close to the rules - everyone.

orconn
07-02-12, 11:44 AM
Mark Twain, he speakum truth!

ShapeShifter
07-02-12, 01:08 PM
- A Little Long in The Tooth.
Usually used to imply that someone or something is well aged. Years ago it was often used to describe animals that were pretty old, especially horses, as their teeth continue to grow, but gums recede making them look even longer. So when buying a horse, you didn't want to get jipped by buying one that was "long in the tooth".

orconn
07-02-12, 02:03 PM
"Does a bear sh.t in the woods?" This phrase used to emphasize that what has been said is the truth. Became popular after the adoption of outhouses by American settlers, particularly those moving west as the U.S. continued its' "Manifest Destiny." Still a popular phrase in the eastern southern half of the Unitied States among those who are newly acquaited with indoor plumbing!

CadillacLuke24
07-02-12, 04:04 PM
Hahaha thanks for sharing guys. Nice Dullahan, keep 'em coming! I like random facts like these, they are entertaining.

Hit the hay/sack

Back in the day, before the advent of modern airbeds, waterbeds, and mattresses, farmers had a nifty setup for beds. They would take a burlap sack and stuff it with hay, thus creating a bed. Sometimes there was no sack, and there was just hay.

That, and likely late night barn rendezvous, resulted in the similar but much more explicit term, roll in the hay :eyebrow:

A good quote that is decent advice: Better to ask a question and be a fool 15 minutes, rather than never ask and be a fool forever.

orconn
07-02-12, 04:33 PM
"Son, you tryin' to tell a weasel how to suck eggs!" Used by an older generation to tell a "know it all younger person" that they may not be as smart as they think they are. Actually one of my favorite sayings and still very usefull!

MotownPimp
07-02-12, 04:37 PM
One of the best threads ever!! :D

creeker
07-02-12, 04:41 PM
Have a square meal, this came from early english term, the plates then were made of wood and square shaped, ergo you cant have desert until you eat your dinner because the plate was then flipped over and it was used for the desert,burning the candle at both ends. normally a candle of olden times would lay in a horizontal
position and be lit at one end only,but on party night it would be lit at both ends, sitting around chewing the fat came about because pieces of fat were hung in
open type wood fireplaces and cooked, then when guests would arrive you would serve them and sit around and chew the fat.

bigm57ict
07-02-12, 05:30 PM
good quote that is decent advice: Better to ask a question and be a fool 15 minutes, rather than never ask and be a fool forever.

Reminds me of one of my favorite Star Wars quotes: "Who's the more foolish? The fool, or the fool who follows him?"

creeker
07-02-12, 05:40 PM
Reminds me of one of my favorite Star Wars quotes: "Who's the more foolish? The fool, or the fool who follows him?"

Kinda like dumb and dumber.

orconn
07-02-12, 05:44 PM
A "bucket shop" a fraudulent or overly aggressive stock or securities firm the deals in low quality of fraudulent stocks usually trading on their own account and contrary to the customer's interest. Very common in the 1920's and still common today among Penny s Stock broker dealers. The term comes from the term for drinking establishments that made their own whisky and sold it by the bucket full. A common term used on Wall Street today.

The-Dullahan
07-02-12, 08:46 PM
Does anyone comprehend the lore that brought rise to "Bob's Your Uncle?" (People in Florida do not say/understand this)

Never really considered it until now, but there must be an interesting tale behind it, if there is a tale at all.

Another one, though as unrelated to this thread as Mark Twain quotes, since someone pointed out to me how morbid mine all seem to be, is that most children's rhymes are far more morbid than they are depicted in modern tellings. Jack and Jill both died, most fairytale storybook characters are murderers or victims and many children's rhymes were born through violent wars, illnesses or murderers. Jack The Ripper, The Salem Witch Trials, The French Revolution, Guy Fawkes, The Black Plague, Lizzie Bordon, Burke and Hare, Springheel Jack, The Hundred Years War and The Great Fire of London have all inspired some sort of children's rhyme. Many have birthed multiple.

talismandave
07-02-12, 11:14 PM
I have heard Ring around the Rosie was about the plague. Ashes ashes were from the burning of the infected.
Gossip
In the early years of politics before polling, it was practice to send someone into the local pubs to sit and listen to what the people were thinking and talking about. They were told to "go sip" with the locals.

CadillacLuke24
07-03-12, 03:12 AM
I read somewhere that the handshake of modern yore came from the medevial, knight-packed times. Having encountered Sir Noobie, Sir Subject would walk up to Noobie with a hand extended. If Noobie was friendly, Noobie would return the greeting and shake Example's hand. If Noobie was sinister, Noobie would whip out his sword, and Example would be able to do the same, because Example's hand was at the ready.

The-Dullahan
07-03-12, 04:56 AM
There are also different types of handshakes. Many people in Western Europe adopted a tradition of shaking by holding one another's wrist, each using their left hand. This allowed the checking of the wrists to see if they concealed weaponry (most people being right-handed, would carry such weapons on the left, as to draw with the right)

"Sinister" is actually directly derived from the Latin word for "Left" as those who fight with their left hands as naturally as most do with their right are evil, forsaken creatures. Thus was tradition for the leader of each army to greet one another upon the battlefield, with their swords held in their left hands...but the evildoers could wield their weapon left-handed, so they were not to be trusted under any circumstance. Many people trained to use their right hand for normal everyday practices, as to avoid being seen as being left-handed. This is also why one throws salt over their left shoulder, as it was very costly at the time (where we get the phrase "Worth Your Salt") and if you spilled it, it was clearly the work of a daemon, which would be seated looking over your left shoulder. Salt, being a cureall for daemonic business to the Latin-Speaking Romans, was then tossed over their left shoulder into the daemon's face.

Funny, superstitious Romans, not knowing how to most properly handle daemons... :bigroll:

As per carrying hidden weapons, the reason we Irish/Scottish/Cornish/Welsh carry knives or daggers on our bootsides, or small Sgian Bubh (small Black-handled dagger) in the top of their kilthose is from a tradition where one would display all weapons they carried on their person when entering the home of a friend. I still practice this tradition to this day. Typically, one would draw their dagger, which was actually usually kept at the side, strapped to the side of the waist, beneath the armpit, under one's shirt where no one could see it, and present it to their friend whose home they have entered, then wear it on the side of their leg, which makes it both obvious and a key way of showing they most obviously had no intention of using it, as it is difficult to stealthily grab a knife that is tied around your boots. Especially if you are Irish, as we have very complicated boots, stemmed from two traditions involving the number of buckles on one's boots and that we have three internationally recognized martial arts designed purely around using one's boot-clad feet and have even developed weapons designed to be used with one's feet (Which go back thousands of years to the Ancients). In spite of our many traditions as Picts, Celts and even more so as Irish, realistically, we are probably actually the least violent people you will ever meet, so long as you never insult our family.

While on the subject of trusting one's company, the way one displays Japanese swords, which are mildly curved and single-sided can mean various things, as by which side the handle is on and whether the sharpened side of the blade is facing up or down. While I do not really watch it, I have aeons ago seen that on the television program "Pawn Stars" they have some displayed behind their counter and have always desired to tell them that they have them upside-down and backwards. In spite of driving past the place a billion times now (Since it is right in the business district in Las Vegas, at the end of the strip, around the corner from the old courthouse) I have never stopped to tell them this, but I have heard it told that in their more recent episodes, they swords are displayed properly. All is well and at peace with the world and I am far from topic, but at least explained the meaning of ONE phrase, alongside several customs.

Aron9000
07-04-12, 05:14 AM
^ That's some good stuff there Chamus. The displaying of the katana is particularly intriguing. I always found the rituals and traditions of feudal(and modern) Japan fascinating, and how devout to this day the Japanese are to ritual, custom, and a sense of honor.

The-Dullahan
07-04-12, 05:40 AM
I interestingly do not possess a traditional Katana in my armoury, but have three near-traditional pieces. While all fully traditionally forged, tempered, sharpened (save that I have the tpis of mine sharpened, which is not normal in Japanese swords) and assembled, I mean they are untraditional by way of not one of them being a "typical" Katana.

One is a specialized variation with an mildly elongated handle and slightly shortened blade length with a false scabbard designed to make it resemble a full-length sword when worn at the hip and an abnormally thick tsuba (The Katana's answer to the Broadsword's crossgaurd). It is designed as a Bujinkan or Ninjutsu weapon and there are three arts designed exclusively around this type of design. Having such a great deal of control through the handle to a blade a bit shorter than one is accustomed to gives it a very unusual feel. One can choke their grip down the handle and develop an almost natural feel as compared to a Katana.

The second is an O Katana, which is for lack of a better terminology in Western culture, a two-handed Katana. It is one of my favourite pieces and it took me quite a bit of effort to acquire. It was designed very simply as a sort of "prototype" as an individual swordsmith was working on spanning out from typical Katana and made very few similar to it. The blade has the most unusual fusion of steel types to make it's temper which gives it a very natural feel if one can look beyond the length (When I was a child, the first swords I learned to use were all two-handed, so it comes readily enough to me)

The last was made with a specialized blade using far more steel than is normal, set at a sharper angle, making for a better edge. It thereby has a further width from the sharpened end to the flat end of the blade with a VERY impact-ready slicing blade. This, along with the greater weight, unique design of the fuller at the rear of the blade and abnormally hefty tsuba make it feel very European.

I have a rather extensive collection of bladed weapons, made any time between now and when such weapons were traditionally in use. Collectively, the collection is easily among my favourite material possessions, if not the very favourite. I have spent a good deal of my time learning such things from as early on as I began going to elementary school (My adoptive Mum would have it no other way) and spent a good deal of my time learning theory and design behind them. While still a hobby to many, my collection is a group of examples chosen not for their looks and I take the practice of swordsmanship and unarmed martial combat rather seriously. There have been very few times over the last twelve years in which I was not at any given time, an instructor of at least one form of armed or unarmed combat. I think one of the things that irks me most about Central Florida are that we have their weird stores here that sell airsoft rifles and fake swords made from stainless steel, typically designed to resemble something from a film, videogame or some sort of Japanese cartoon and while impressive to behold, they could never be used as real weapons, are made of stainless steel, which is weak by nature, have no practical design to them, typically feature false etchings (if European themed) or a fake Hamon (If Asian themed) and will sell for between $300 and $1,000, which though never enough to purchase a real weapon, is an awful lot to ask for an obvious falsity that is less-than a pale imitation of someone's ethnic culture. you'd think all the fake Chinese Gim swords produced from cheap metals with no tangs out of China would be offensive to the people there, but the mass-production seems to state otherwise. The other part is the American market, where liking anime, playing Assassin's Creed or watching Kill Bill make you a "swordsman" by some extent or an authority on the subject at the very least. Once I was dragged by a friend to a "Renaissance Faire" in Tampa. This was years ago. It was nice to not have people ask why I wore a kilt though. The climax of the day however was when I was in a serious discussion with a vendor there, no more than a few years older than me, which turned sour when I could clearly tell he knew nothing of what he was trying to discuss and was merely seeking attention, going on to boast that one of the other vendors there who marketed a chance to battle your friends with foam-padded-PVC rattan sticks, liked him to "hang around" there because his elite skill with a weapon impressed and dazzled the crowds and brought in business. While attempting to gracefully drop out of the conversation, my presumptions were revealed and at various intervals over the next two hours I had to deal with this buffoon. This resulted in him eventually convincing me to accept his ridiculous "challenge" and though afterwards he was rather embarrassed, that was never my intention. I left him with my card and contact info for an associate in the area (As I lived somewhat far away) as well as information for when the ARMA was going to be conducting a weekend seminar in Fort Lauderdale that he was free to attend to see if this was something he really chose to take up. As grateful as he portrayed himself to be, neither my contact or I ever heard back from him.

Okay, done being obnoxious now and I sincerely apologize to everyone for how long this ranting post probably already is.

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To continue to where Creeker mentioned Chewing The Fat, the term Bring Home The Bacon refers to a time when bacon was not as easy to come by as going to your local grocery. One would literally proudly hand their bacon on strings running back and forth around their home (which in Europe at this time, typically featured one large communal room used as a living room, kitchen and dining area at once, if not also the bedroom) and would invite guests over, similarly to the same way people in the urban parts of the Americas will invite you over for dinner, as a real means of trying to show off something fancy they have recently obtained.

77CDV
07-04-12, 05:52 PM
^Nightwolf Award nominee. :lol:

The-Dullahan
07-04-12, 07:12 PM
Anyone ever find out what happened to him?

CadillacLuke24
07-05-12, 02:04 AM
IDK. He was fairly active it seemed, or that was just my trolling of the What did you do to your Car today thread.

ShapeShifter
07-05-12, 01:19 PM
- That Dog Won't Hunt.
I first became aware of this expression in the 60's, as it was a popular response by LBJ to negative criticism from political opponents and the press regarding him or his administrations actions or plans. Especially regarding military actions/operations during the Vietnam Conflict.

Internet searches show it my have derived from the 17th or 18th Century expression, "that cock won't fight". This was widely used at the time to say that someone's plan or idea is as useful as a "cock that won't fight".

There's also a slight southern variation, "that dog don't hunt".

So, if anyone says that Elvis or Tupac is alive. Just respond with; well "that dog won't hunt".

CadillacLuke24
07-05-12, 04:20 PM
XXXXXX wears the pants in that house.

This was developed , I believe, during the early 1900s, when men wore pants and women wore dresses. Anything outside of that was seen as improper. Given pants were connected to men, who ran things back then, whoever "wore the pants" ran the show. So when someone says "She wears the pants in that house!", they are implying that the woman of the house is a very independent individual, and she has control over her less independent husband.

:D

ShapeShifter
07-05-12, 06:56 PM
I'm familiar with a slightly different version that goes; "she wears the pants in that family". Very similar meaning in that the wife is in control of the husband and makes all the decisions for the household.

talismandave
07-05-12, 07:31 PM
I'm familiar with a slightly different version that goes; "she wears the pants in that family". Very similar meaning in that the wife is in control of the husband and makes all the decisions for the household.

How familiar?....:D

ShapeShifter
07-05-12, 07:47 PM
^^^Familiar enough to give that type a "wide berth".lol

The-Dullahan
07-05-12, 08:37 PM
There had better not ever be anyone wearing pants in my family. I would never stand for it.

77CDV
07-05-12, 11:59 PM
Anyone ever find out what happened to him?

He's gone off to Bimmerland.

cadillac kevin
07-06-12, 01:32 AM
He's gone off to Bimmerland.

Oh, you mean his front yard where he's got the clapped out 3 series with no interior and a ratty top sitting on cinderblocks?

The-Dullahan
07-06-12, 03:38 AM
Yeah, it is shameful to just keep a car in your yard like that. Ridiculous, in fact.

Oh, hey Kevin. What's up?

Aron9000
07-06-12, 06:07 AM
Yeah, it is shameful to just keep a car in your yard like that. Ridiculous, in fact.

Oh, hey Kevin. What's up?

Hey now, its only a crime if you've posted over 20 pages of how much you love said car, its been over 3 years since you tore it down, and its still sitting on cinder blocks in your driveway.

cadillac kevin
07-06-12, 10:04 AM
Yeah, it is shameful to just keep a car in your yard like that. Ridiculous, in fact.

Oh, hey Kevin. What's up?

My car was only in my yard for 16 months. Besides, if I'm going to have a lawn ornament, it damn well better be massive and imposing.

EcSTSatic
07-06-12, 12:13 PM
I'm familiar with a slightly different version that goes; "she wears the pants in that family". Very similar meaning in that the wife is in control of the husband and makes all the decisions for the household.

Then there is always the takeoff "she lets me wear the pants in the family"

brandondeleo
07-06-12, 01:24 PM
I have a feeling this Kevin vs. Robert thing isn't going to end for a little while. :lol:

The-Dullahan
07-06-12, 01:28 PM
^there's a Kevin VS Robert thing? Nobody told me?

You guys are lame.

brandondeleo
07-06-12, 01:30 PM
^there's a Kevin VS Robert thing? Nobody told me?

You guys are lame.
I didn't know there was a goth/skirt/douche AND hipster combo out there. They don't come around too often.

cadillac kevin
07-06-12, 02:16 PM
^there's a Kevin VS Robert thing? Nobody told me?

You guys are lame.

I was unaware of this "thing" as well. Someone should really inform me of such things.

cadillac kevin
07-06-12, 02:18 PM
I didn't know there was a goth/skirt/douche AND hipster combo out there. They don't come around too often.

Am I the hipster or the goth/ skirt/ douche? Answer correctly. Else you will get a visit from my "friends" and you may not be seen for quite a while.

ShapeShifter
07-06-12, 02:29 PM
Then there is always the takeoff "she lets me wear the pants in the family"
Well maybe there's some truth to the quote, "there's somebody out there for everyone" . Thank goodness....cause better them than me!:)

The-Dullahan
07-07-12, 01:39 AM
Am I the hipster or the goth/ skirt/ douche? Answer correctly. Else you will get a visit from my "friends" and you may not be seen for quite a while.

Kevin, old chum. I daresay, we find ourselves at the brink of a warfront and we remained unaware of it. Whenever we are in the same area and I buy you that beer I owe you and we test drive one another's broughams, we will have to leave room for our epic duel. I'll bring the whiskey.

Also, I think he meant me. I think the skirt thing applies, but the rest are a bit odd of choices to apply to me. Not sure where the Hipster thing came in and I presume the Goth thing is because I drive a Hearse. Poorly constructed logical pathway.

dkozloski
07-07-12, 03:58 AM
Shut tighter than a bull's ass in fly time. Anybody who has seen the interaction between cattle and warble flies knows where this came from.

MrHolland
07-07-12, 04:07 AM
Aaahahahahahahahahahahahahahaaaaaaa

The-Dullahan
07-07-12, 04:54 AM
Well, never heard that one before.

brandondeleo
07-07-12, 05:19 AM
Some of those random old colloquialisms are a kick.

talismandave
07-07-12, 10:28 AM
Colder than a well diggers ass.:D Heard it in a Tom Waits song and always stuck with me.

brandondeleo
07-07-12, 11:55 AM
One of my favorites, shaking like a hooker's knees in church.

CadillacLuke24
07-08-12, 03:31 AM
Colder than a Witch's :tits: is another popular one.

Sharp as a marble is my new all-time favorite description for those who are not so witty. One of my assistant managers used that to describe one of my coworkers, and it fits like a glove. I still laugh when I think of that.

The-Dullahan
07-08-12, 03:37 AM
^I knew that first one was going to come up.

Fun fact, a glass bulb and tube style mercury thermometer is known as a Weather Witch in some regions. When at low enough temperatures the bulb, often referred to the "teat" will freeze. Some sayings are not as obvious in origin as they sound.



Also, speaking from experience, a Witch's...

...Well, that is a story for another time and place...and probably another audience too.

CadillacLuke24
07-09-12, 04:29 AM
Anybody know where 7 months of Sunday came from?

The-Dullahan
07-09-12, 06:14 AM
Suspecting it is akin to the phrase "A Month of Sundays" which implies a long, slow-moving month or in general, a long, drawn out amount of time regardless, usually used in an exaggerated fashion, such as telling someone who is costing themself an extra hour that the way they are doing it will take a month of Sundays, I do in fact know the origin, which is as simple as it sounds, especially when you grew up hearing it commonly, as your good Uncle Chamus has dealt with more than not-so-cold Witches in his day.


The origin of this is very simple, just as much so as it sounds. Sunday, for Catholics and some other Christians including Protestants and Mormons is a day when no work is done and one sets it aside for worship only (Though how well this is followed varies greatly from church to church and person to person). "A Month Of Sundays" would be a very long time spent on a project with none of the work accomplished. Ideally speaking, "A Month of Wednesdays" is thereby superior, in the same sense one can joke about being able to tell if a car rolled off of the assembly line on a Wednesday over a dreaded Monday or Friday car.

Another favourite from the Northeast is "As slow as Molasses" which refers to the way molasses pours from a bottle. The saying is very often lengthened to "As slow as Molasses in January" and anyone who has ever tried to pour molasses below freezing will understand why. Likewise, as we Irish tend to do with our sayings, it can be lengthened even more to "As slow as Molasses in the midwinter running uphill against the wind" which is, in theory, excruciatingly slow. Who first decided to relate slowness to molasses in the midwinter, I do not know, but perhaps know the reason why it became a common quote that people could relate to and thereby understand. Again, in more traditional regions, you may still find this in practice, but especially prior to about two-hundred years ago, a simple candy-type treat one could make was frozen molasses, which children enjoyed due to it's flavour and the fun and fancy preparation method, which is literally to pour molasses into the snow, which freezes it solid on impact in whatever shape or pattern it is poured. In this way, one can envision that molasses in January does not run very fast, nor does it run at all.

I do not imagine such practice is common with city children, as from my experience, most of their parents have a very real fear that if their child ever eats anything that was within a foot of the ground, they will immediately die from the immense levels of toxins that would certainly overwhelm their tiny body, but can somehow exist on the floor one stands on without any consequence. With parents upholding such a thing as taboo, it is little wonder some people never developed a proper immune system through contamination and contact with harmless germs that would otherwise be encountered in every day life.

CadillacLuke24
07-09-12, 04:27 PM
I've heard of the molasses one before. Matter-of-fact, I believe my old man has used it to describe me LOL. The Sunday one likely pertains to what you said, especially in the olden days. Nowadays though, it's rare. Some places, like Pierre, SD, which is very Catholic, seem to almost shut down on Sundays. Most of the time though, that rule isn't quite so strict (mostly because of the new rules in the New Testament). Crap, I can't remember the last time I've had a proper Sunday. Yesterday I was up at 4:20 a.m. and finally hit the hay at 2:15 the next day.

The-Dullahan
07-09-12, 11:23 PM
Certain parts of Utah share this Sunday scenario, as Mormons are among those to uphold this tradition as well. At least, that is what the Missionaries I know tell me.

Aron9000
07-13-12, 12:10 AM
A watched pot never boils . . . .

Every time I'm trying to boil water on my crappy smooth top range, I think of Mr. Data watching the tea pot.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QP2USRhS96w

creeker
07-13-12, 12:13 AM
Watch out for him, he's slicker than snot on a door knob.

CadillacLuke24
07-13-12, 01:24 AM
^That one's obvious, just like avoiding something like the plague :lol:

The-Dullahan
07-13-12, 02:09 AM
Actually, if I had the ability to traverse time and space (Preferably in some sort of whimsical machine designed in the mind of Mary Shelley or Jules Verne), one of the first things I would go see is the Plague.

77CDV
07-13-12, 11:33 PM
Actually, if I had the ability to traverse time and space (Preferably in some sort of whimsical machine designed in the mind of Mary Shelley or Jules Verne), one of the first things I would go see is the Plague.

Pop into the local county hospital. They get a couple cases of plague a year.

The-Dullahan
07-14-12, 01:18 AM
It's just...not the same :(

CadillacLuke24
07-14-12, 02:27 AM
:bigroll: You kids these days. For something equally horrendous, go see somebody with gangrene or Ebola Virus. You'll get your kicks.

The-Dullahan
07-14-12, 02:48 AM
I have seen both.

The Plague was more than merely an illness. It was an event in Human history that sparked a political, economical, religious and cultural renaissance. The world was massively changed in it's wake. It was actually a very pivotal point in human growth. It is rather the same as myself traveling to see the rise of the Roman Empire. Honestly, if such abilities were ever mine to own, you would all know when they were. I would never again be heard from by any of you.


Interesting sayings?

The Luck of The Irish.

This saying actually refers to a stock of bad luck and misfortune. One must remember, one can be very Lucky and have lots of Luck...it may just all be bad. Anyone who is knowledgeable in Irish history will know from whence this had sprang. I have learned, as an example, "The Potato Famine" is something children in the South learn of and have little knowledge of what it actually was. In the North, schools teach of "The Great Hunger" which was a massive military effort to eradicate the Irish population from existence, similar to what the Nazi party did to the Jewish, but on an arguably larger scale, as no other foreign power stepped in to intervene or prevent it.

When your ancestral family's homeland and farm are taken from you by force and acts of violence, the crops are burned, so no one can use them, the enemy surrounds your country with their navy, attacking and sinking any ship making an effort to bring goods to the native population, they intentionally spread diseases over any crops you are able to grow on your own in the coldest point of winter, you watch your wife and child starve in your arms and with everything else lost, try to make a stand for yourself, are criminalized, because the invading power actually enacted a law to make it illegal for anyone to speak your native language, wear any clothing that resembles any of the colours of your national flag and best of all, makes it illegal for a native of the country to reside within the country and you find yourself being executed or shipped off for slave labour...You are now experiencing just a taste of The Luck of The Irish. :)

RobbieB
07-20-12, 12:51 PM
^^^My mom (a good Irish woman) always said this one. But never had an idea where it came from.

ShapeShifter
07-20-12, 02:39 PM
- Tell the truth, and shame the Devil.
Seems this one is meant to say that no matter how bad your situation is its best to be honest and truthful regarding the matter, even when it seems it’s more beneficial to lie. Supposedly the truth shames the devil, because he gets to make no claim toward our soul, as he does when we lie.

- Two cats in a sack fighting.
First heard this term used by an older guy to describe a woman's walk as she walked past, he exclaimed; "damn! The way she's wiggling, it looks like two cats in a sack fighting." Until then, I'd never heard that expression.

After a bit of checking it seems there's also the version below for a different part of the female anatomy.

- Cats in a bag.
This version describes a well endowed woman not wearing a bra and vigorously walking. Expression goes; check her out, she's not wearing a bra. Response...yep, cats in a bag!

Raquel Welch in One Million Years B.C....was the embodiment of both expressions.

No offense meant for the above.

Submariner409
07-20-12, 05:03 PM
- Cats in a bag.
This version describes a well endowed woman not wearing a bra and vigorously walking.

.............and as she passes by and walks away, "Two hawgs fightin' in a burlap sack".

(Usually seen at McDonald's and BurgerKing)

ShapeShifter
07-20-12, 09:12 PM
.............and as she passes by and walks away, "Two hawgs fightin' in a burlap sack".

(Usually seen at McDonald's and BurgerKing)
Not heard that one either

....and women aren't immune either. I've overheard their expressions regarding the size of a man's shoe or his hands. There're just reluctant to jump into the fray with us guys.

The-Dullahan
07-20-12, 11:07 PM
While I have seen some men who can be absolutely awful, women can be just as bad, if not worse.

If ever setting a Guinness World Record requiring you are walking on stilts and a good four-or-five feet taller and happen to be wearing a kilt, make sure to keep close attention to EVERY girl who may have brought a camera to film it and exactly where she has it angled.

Kad4Life
07-21-12, 12:10 AM
"The Cat" was the Bos'un's whip .
It was kept in a baize cloth bag .

When the Cat got out of the Bag someone got a lashing .

Kad

Florian
07-21-12, 12:38 PM
couple of Masonic items:

Being "blackballed" - In Masonry you are voted on for membership into the fraternity. There are white balls and black balls which are used as voting tokens. If any of the voting tokens that are counted are black, the nominee is not allowed to join, hence being blackballed.

Masterpiece. When you become a master mason you have studied the works of Masonry enough to be passed to that degee. In the old days, you actually built something to show you were a competent master mason....thus, your finished creation was called your 'masterpiece"

Im a 32nd Degree Master Mason, Shriner and Scottish Rite member.


F

The-Dullahan
07-21-12, 02:17 PM
"Cat out of the bag" also refers to when conmen in fifteenth century Europe would sell piglets (Valued more than cats) in burlap sacks (As they were tied up that way to the sides of wagons) and when it was very busy and business was bustling away, people would just be handed the first of said sacks without time for any sort of thorough lookover of the piglet. Naturally, some men learned that they could sell cats in bags this way for the value of pigs. Thereby, "The Cat's Out of the Bag" can mean "The Jig is up." meaning everything hidden or kept secret is now publicly known.

The phrase "The Jig Is Up" most likely refers to the Jig that was done at the end of an Elizabethan era play after all of the plot twists were revealed and the play was essentially over. The Jig being up would mean it was over or currently beginning (As "Up" could mean either) but either way, it would be after the plot had ended and been most thoroughly elaborated.

RippyPartsDept
07-21-12, 02:27 PM
"HEAVENS TO BETSY"

Meaning
A mild exclamation of surprise.

Origin
This American phrase has been in circulation since, primarily restricted to America, the latter part of the 19th century, although its use faded throughout the 20th century and it is now something of an anachronism. The first example of it that I can find is from the US journal Ballou's dollar monthly magazine, Volume 5, January 1857:
Heavens to Betsy!" he exclaims...

It is possible that the phrase is a minced oath (http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/minced-oath.html) and an alternative to 'Hell's bells', although there's no real evidence of that,
Of course, what we would like to know is, 'was Betsy a real person and, if so, who?'. Various theories have been put forward but it is unlikely that she will be identified. For phrases that contain names that are genuinely eponymous, i.e. named after a known person or fictional character, it isn't difficult to trace the person concerned, as in 'sweet Fanny Adams (http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/sweet-fanny-adams.html)', 'kiss me Hardy (http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/kiss%20me%20hardy.html)' etc. When we come to phrase like 'Mickey Finn (http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/mickey-finn.html)', 'happy as Larry (http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/as-happy-as-larry.html)', where there is doubt as to the named person, a strong case can be made to suggest that the names were invented. That seems to be the case with Betsy.
The etymologist Charles Earle Funk published Heavens to Betsy! and other curious sayings in 1955. In that he ventured the opinion that the origins of 'Heavens to Betsy' were "completely unsolvable".
See also: Heavens to Murgatroyd (http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/heavens-to-murgatroyd.html).

CadillacLuke24
07-21-12, 10:06 PM
There used to be "Spending money like a drunken sailor", but the new popular one is "spending like a politician".

ShapeShifter
07-22-12, 04:24 PM
- A Snake In The Grass.
An expression commonly used to describe a distrustful individual with a sly, sneaky and conniving character or actions.

Its origin is believed to go back to biblical times, as a serpent was depicted as the hidden unsuspecting and evil creature that deceived Eve into breaking Gods Commandment for fruit not to be eaten in the Garden of Eden. Early English Speakers were also known to use the word Snake as a despicable term to identify a contemptible person. Early modern history has the phrase being stated as; "There's a Snake in the Grass.”

Today it's more commonly expressed as someone being "A Snake In The Grass"; further describing a backstabbing, lying and cheating friend or love one that has turned on you.

- When you dance with Devil, the Devil don't change, the Devil changes you!
I heard this expression in a movie. Took it to mean that if one chooses to embrace a truly evil person with evil deeds, then don't expect any positive change; for the only likely change will be you descending into evil.

- If you walk a straight line through a cow pasture, you're bound to step in some cow pies.
Another movie line with the message; if one chooses to walk straight ahead in life giving no regard to what my lay in their path, then they will surely step in a lot of chit throughout their journey.

orconn
07-22-12, 05:12 PM
Anyone who has trod the mattos of Brazil or the rural paths of Vietnam knows full well, literally, what "a snake in the grass" means. Having encountered an eight inch in diameter Bushmaster crossing the path six feet in front of me with grass four feet high on either side of the foot and a half wide trail. And having encountered a similarly large Cobra, under similar circumstances in Vietnam. I am very aware of the perils of "snakes in the grass" Biblical or the real thing! Under those circumstances, I find it it is best to back up to get a running start to leap as high and wide as you can over the snake, and keep running till you are well away from the reptile. I find this works well when encountering human snakes as well!

Submariner409
07-22-12, 05:18 PM
It is only a snake in the grass that will stand up and knife a man in the back with so evil-smelling a report.

ShapeShifter
07-22-12, 06:35 PM
- The greatest trick the Devil ever pulled was convincing the world he didn't exist.
Charles Baudelaire, a French Poet, 1821-1867 is credited as having written this expression. These exact words were delivered by Kevin Spacey in the movie, “The Usual Suspects” in regards to the non-existence belief in the supposedly evil character Keyser Sze.

There are some who believe the Devils greatest trick lies in his continuous attempts to convince the world that he is God?

ShapeShifter
08-09-12, 11:37 AM
- "When you call me that, SMILE!"

The often misquoted iconic quote from Owen Wister's 1902 novel "The Virginian". There's a scene where The Virginian and Trampas are in a poker game and it's The Virginian's turn to bet or leave the game. Being impatient, Trampas says "your bet you son of a...."...before he could finish the Virginian drew and laid his gun calmly on the table, then he slowly and deliberately says "When you call me that, SMILE.", all while staring Trampas dead in the eyes.

MrHolland
08-13-12, 09:49 PM
I read through here and hope I didn't just over look the entry. My wife ask me where the saying "screwed the pooch" came from. I have no idea, but I bet one of you smart fellows might know!!

-----Hopefully its not literal!!

The-Dullahan
08-13-12, 10:19 PM
Never had a problem with Snakes. Then again, Snakes and the Irish have a natural connection and long history together as allies against a greater nemesis. Or so every major religion ever practiced in Europe over the last twelve thousand years tells us.

brandondeleo
08-14-12, 11:31 PM
I like squeezy snakes.

I don't like bitey snakes.

orconn
08-15-12, 12:07 AM
The "squeezy" snakes that could be found around places I have lived were not to my liking any better than the "Bitey" snakes. Although in the warmer regions of Brazil small Boas were kept as house "pets" (?) in order to keep the rodent population in check!

The-Dullahan
08-15-12, 01:53 AM
The Squeezy Snakes you speak of live in Florida too. They just captured and killed one pregnant with 87 young.

In 2008, they greatly changed the laws about them because a child was killed when a typical Ghetto/Redneck couple starved a snake to a point it had so little weight to it that experts were shocked it was even alive and then kept it in an open tank. It escaped and killed the woman's small child. Dogs kill people every year, but Florida has not yet enacted a dog law. They claim it was because there was at the time a large population of such imported snakes living in the wild and that this law would, through some sort of sorcery, eradicate that problem entirely within a month. Again, Florida has more wild dogs than snakes.

The law was passed and the state no longer issues permits to own the concern species (Those like myself who possess them must continually renew them, as if they expire, we can never get another in this state) and made it a law that all people who did not would have to have their snake euthanized -no exceptions-. As one would expect, everyone who could not afford this absurd new license on top of so many already having their expensive class three concern species license (which lets you adopt basically any animal you want, so long as the state can make sure you are taking good care of it from time to time) as well as those who never had a license to begin with were in sudden need to get rid of their snakes or face charges. These people tried having them adopted, but the state pressured any shelter or zoo not to take any adoptions, lobbied for laws against those with expiring licenses to put their pets for adoptions altogether, enacted a law against the transport of the species out of state, to retain ownership of them in another state where they did not need a permit and of course, made sure to point out it was all for the good of the world, as there would be less in the wild, in spite of all of these efforts clearly minimizing releases into the wild. It was just a bunch of rednecks mad that one child was killed by an animal that supposedly got mankind kicked out of Eden.

In the end, what did everyone who could not get their legalization do? You guessed it, they released their snakes into the wild, as they refused to have them killed.

Those of us who kept ours had to renew out licenses annually and are faced with more pressure on the law that the animals be "chipped" with identification computer chips at the base of the neck, as to make an effort to prosecute whomever the animal belonged to possible, should the snake escape or be let go.

That being said, Bitey snakes are just as fun. As are the venomous ones. I kept a pygmy dusky rattlesnake for a bit a while ago, when I found him curled up on my sprinkler head one evening in the front yard. Picked him up bare-handed, as he was not a threat in any way, being a particularly humble species, as are ALL rattlesnakes, as well as a particularly passive one, which is somewhat unheard of for rattlesnake breeds.

Today's interesting phrase, or more of a word: Scapegoat.

When the biblical natives were fearful of their sins, they found they could place them through words onto a goat, then sacrifice it (Biblical people were fond of Sacrifice. The Christians try to cover this up, but up until the Dark Ages, the rite of Sacrifice was also common for Christians as well) which would thus clear them of their sins, even if in only their own minds. When one blames another and they are punished for it, those who are truly guilty, if particularly shady, can clear their conscience, as the debt was repaid, even if they have instead simply committed two wrongs to make a pale imitation of a right.


The "squeezy" snakes that could be found around places I have lived were not to my liking any better than the "Bitey" snakes. Although in the warmer regions of Brazil small Boas were kept as house "pets" (?) in order to keep the rodent population in check!

Among my various snakes are my several Pythons (Of various types, ranging from the Royal Python to the Reticulated Python) I have a single Columbian Boa. A smaller variety, they seldom reach over fifteen feet in length (Though snakes never stop growing until they die)

I have no rodent problem. Sadly, not all of my snakes can eat a pig and be full for the next twenty-four months and I have to purchase rats from the local pet store. Rather ridiculous, as the pet store I used to go to was incredibly justifiable in their price range and would also cut me deals. Instead, I must go to PetCo, where rats cost $12...each. I actually spend more feeding my pets every week than I spend on gasoline.

brandondeleo
08-18-12, 05:07 AM
My area is full of Rattlesnakes. Lots of them.

brandondeleo
08-18-12, 05:08 AM
I used to have a Ball Python as a pet. I love those things.

The-Dullahan
08-18-12, 02:12 PM
My area is full of Rattlesnakes. Lots of them.

Mine too, though it is also full of a dozen other types of snakes. As was my neighbour's pool once.

She came to me to remove a snake from her screened-in pool area (many neighbours have come to me to remove these or other animals from their yard/house. Even a six-foot-long alligator recently)

To my surprise and delight, the snake in question was a five foot Diamondback Rattlesnake. I kept the snake for a couple days, before releasing it into the state park across the road. All of my local region is undeveloped land, just like the park, but I figured it would stand a better chance someplace like that, where it will not get killed by an orange farmer or his tractor.

orconn
08-18-12, 04:29 PM
I've lived in many areas where both venomous and non venomous snakes are plentiful, and while I have seen several out in their own habitat, I can't say I've ever found them to be a bother around the house of yard.

brandondeleo
08-18-12, 05:11 PM
The most common snakes out here are rattlesnakes, but there are lots of other kinds as well. I don't know enough about snakes to identify them, but I know most of them are perfectly harmless.

CadillacLuke24
08-20-12, 02:51 AM
I have a new saying.....

Needier than a Northstar Cadillac :D

The-Dullahan
08-20-12, 03:21 AM
Littler/Uglier/Noisier than an Import Sedan.

A saying usually used with some combination of such adjectives, used to describe chihuahuas (or however you spell them) and other lapdogs that serve no actual purpose, but are still a recognized "breed", particularly the ones most notorious for being obnoxiously yippy, scrawny or just downright odd-looking.

dkozloski
08-20-12, 03:23 AM
Blinking like a frog in a hailstorm.

Shaking like a dog crappin' razor blades.

Sweatin' like a whore in church with a $100 date on the front steps.

Ugly as home made soap.

Ugly enough to make the Alaska Railroad jump the tracks and head off up a dirt road.

Built with every brick in the proper place.

Tougher than Sole Leather Billy.

So cheap he wouldn't pay two-bits to see Jesus Christ ride down the street on a bicycle.

Couldn't hit a bull in the ass with a shovel full of rice.

Couldn't hit a hippo in the rear with a banjo.

Your momma is so old she farts dust.

Your momma wears combat boots.

The-Dullahan
08-20-12, 05:10 AM
I've heard that "Your Mom wears Combat Boots" one before.

I typically nod politely and say "Thank you. She does." as my adoptive Mum taught me that it is only proper to wear boots and I shall teach this custom and follow it to my grave, as she did before me.

No idea what it's origins were, but I suspect it did not refer to my personal childhood...which is a shame, really.

Apparently, it refers to a time when poor women would rob corpses on the battlefield and thereby acquire combat boots. In no way is this an inaccurate depiction, robbing corpses on or off the field of combat. However, I personally believe she always had such boots without having to steal those off of anyone's body. According to popular myth in my place of childhood, she was born with a set of knuckledusters or a pair of boots, depending on who you ask. That was basically all she owned when she arrived in this country as well.

And here we arrive at another saying.

"He/She is so tough, He/She could drink a kettle of boiling water and piss out ice cubes."

brandondeleo
08-20-12, 05:28 AM
Oh, we could go into pages of 'your mom' jokes. :lol:

The-Dullahan
08-20-12, 02:22 PM
FACT.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41quRZDJnuL._SX342_.jpg

too bad they misspelled "Mum".

orconn
08-20-12, 02:41 PM
If they had used the British spelling of "Mom" to "Mum" they might as well have gone all the the way and and made it "My Mum can kick your Da's Bum" .... cheerio!

dkozloski
08-20-12, 02:48 PM
I've heard that "Your Mom wears Combat Boots" one before.

I typically nod politely and say "Thank you. She does." as my adoptive Mum taught me that it is only proper to wear boots and I shall teach this custom and follow it to my grave, as she did before me.

No idea what it's origins were, but I suspect it did not refer to my personal childhood...which is a shame, really.

Apparently, it refers to a time when poor women would rob corpses on the battlefield and thereby acquire combat boots. In no way is this an inaccurate depiction, robbing corpses on or off the field of combat. However, I personally believe she always had such boots without having to steal those off of anyone's body. According to popular myth in my place of childhood, she was born with a set of knuckledusters or a pair of boots, depending on who you ask. That was basically all she owned when she arrived in this country as well.

And here we arrive at another saying.

"He/She is so tough, He/She could drink a kettle of boiling water and piss out ice cubes."The reference is to rustics that wear military surplus clothing.

dkozloski
08-20-12, 02:49 PM
She's so hard hearted she wouldn't piss in your ass if your guts were on fire.

orconn
08-20-12, 02:55 PM
I always thought that the saying "Your mom wears combat boots" was supposed to compare your mother to the nasty mean drill sargeant in Basic Training!

vincentm
08-20-12, 03:26 PM
"Screwed without dinner and a movie"

orconn
08-20-12, 03:28 PM
^^^ Your last date?

The-Dullahan
08-20-12, 04:34 PM
The reference is to rustics that wear military surplus clothing.


I always thought that the saying "Your mom wears combat boots" was supposed to compare your mother to the nasty mean drill sargeant in Basic Training!

Either of these, as well as the battlefield corpse story can all adequately describe me Mum.

Also, Mum is not British, The British are actually to blame for the introduction of the term "Mom"

Never understood that, because "Mum" is supposed to be short for "Mother" which is pronounced with the "O" making the same sound as a "U" in "Mum". Thereby, "Mom" would be short for "Moth-Ther" and that isn't even a real word. IIRC, the correct English Dictionary symbol for the "O" sound I am trying to convey is " " but I think you get the idea. Moral of the story: anyone can speak English...except the English and the French.

CadillacLuke24
08-21-12, 12:54 AM
"Screwed without dinner and a movie"

Wham, Bam, Thank you, Ma'am!!

talismandave
08-23-12, 12:17 AM
Nuttier than squirrel sh*t.

orconn
08-23-12, 12:26 AM
^^^ I have never heard that one before. I won't ask how they came to verify the the truth of the statement!

ShapeShifter
08-24-12, 02:42 PM
Shes uglier than the face on an iodine bottle.

It's raining harder than a cow pissing on a flat rock.

Even a blind squirrel finds an acorn once in a while.

Uglier than the southbound end of a northbound mule.

Happier than a pig in $hit.

CadillacLuke24
08-24-12, 04:13 PM
You smell like the south end of a northbound cow!

ShapeShifter
08-24-12, 08:51 PM
If you lie down with dogs, you'll get up with fleas.
.

talismandave
08-25-12, 02:11 AM
A face that would make a freight train take a dirt road.

So dumb... couldn't figure out how to pour piss out of a boot if the instructions were on the heel.

RippyPartsDept
08-25-12, 09:53 AM
F'd up as a turnt over tackle box

ShapeShifter
08-25-12, 11:12 AM
If you don't stand for something, you'll fall for anything.

CadillacLuke24
08-25-12, 12:49 PM
Not the brightest crayon in the box

Not the sharpest knife in the drawer

Not the sharpest tool in the shed

brandondeleo
08-25-12, 07:59 PM
My phrase of choice ^ is "not the brightest bulb in the chandelier."

CadillacLuke24
08-26-12, 01:29 AM
That's a good one!

As for faces, I remember a good one a classmate said one time:

"Paper bag over her head-9/10.

Take the bag off....ZERO"

:D

orconn
08-26-12, 02:39 AM
"She's really got a good personality!" Anyone know the origin or care to comment?

talismandave
08-26-12, 04:10 AM
Double bagger; One for over her head and one for you, just in case hers falls off.

Long before Viagra a co-worker always said... "I'm so good at doing it with it limp, I can now paddle a canoe upstream with a necktie."

ShapeShifter
08-27-12, 12:12 PM
A clenched fist is a hand disabled, because it cannot give nor can it receive.

ShapeShifter
10-14-12, 04:20 PM
That which we hate most in others, is often what we most hate in ourselves.

CadillacLuke24
10-14-12, 08:22 PM
LOL when you think about it, that's true.

Damn Wyoming wind! I'd venture to guess that we can create a new, equally meaningful one: Damn Ellensburg Wind!

I may have said this before, but if something's a colossal PITA to get done, it's an Act of Congress.

pajeff10
10-14-12, 09:10 PM
Horsepower is how fast you hit the wall... torque is how far you take the wall with you.

brandondeleo
10-14-12, 09:32 PM
Horsepower is how fast you hit the wall... torque is how far you take the wall with you.
I like it!

CadillacLuke24
10-15-12, 01:02 AM
Sometimes you kick, sometimes you get kicked.

Some days you're the dog, some days you're the fire hydrant.

talismandave
10-15-12, 02:28 AM
Horsepower is how fast you hit the wall... torque is how far you take the wall with you.
That's a new one for me!

Some days you get the bear, other days the bear gets you.

I used to tell my workers when they would complain that a policy or schedule wasn't fair that....."The fair is only in town one week a year...and this ain't the week!"

ShapeShifter
10-20-12, 07:14 AM
Life and death are the same, as no one born will leave life alive. So, are you living your life or just living til death?

The-Dullahan
10-20-12, 11:56 AM
Never show your teeth until you're close enough to bite.

Useful life Motto. Urban kiddies don't normally understand it. Most likely, because they're all bark. Another good one, though unrelated would be this. A motto strongly touted in my homeland.

The Origin actually goes back a very long time and is seldom translated into English. It was touted by travelers across Europe and nomadic mercenaries from The High West.

Stoneage_Caddy
10-21-12, 12:06 AM
She drives like she graduated the Helen Keller driving school

-me

CadillacLuke24
10-21-12, 01:33 AM
^^^^ :histeric:

Women drivers?

NO SURVIVORS.

brandondeleo
10-21-12, 01:49 AM
LOL :histeric:

Kad4Life
10-21-12, 11:58 AM
Where does the term 'Piping Hot' come from ?
Anyone ?

CadillacLuke24
10-21-12, 03:54 PM
My guess is that heating was, back in the day, done by steam, which was transported by pipes. Not sure, but that's my guess.

Cadillac Kid03
10-21-12, 07:40 PM
Joseph Stalin
A prisoner of war is a man who tries to kill you and fails, and then asks you not to kill him.

CadillacLuke24
10-21-12, 08:05 PM
Pete and RePete were on a fence.

*Version 1 ending*

Pete fell off. Who was left? REPETE

*My version ending*

RePete shot Pete in the chest with a .44 Mag, so Pete died and fell off the fence.

Who was left for all freaking eternity?

Jesda
10-21-12, 08:25 PM
She drives like she graduated the Helen Keller driving school

-me

:histeric:

Stoneage_Caddy
10-21-12, 11:13 PM
There are several variations....

When you see a beat up car:
Hey , that car looks like a drivers ed car used at the Helen Keller Driving School

When your riding with someone:
Damit Helen that was a curb

When the sun hits you in the eyes while driving:
"Hang on everyone , were about to go helen keller here"

When you rear end someone:
"Sorry bout that, I learned how to drive at the Helen Keller Academy of Driving"

When someone asks what racing school you went to:
"Helen Keller Racing Academy"

When your at the gun range and they ask where you got your gun Liscense:
"Helen Keller's shoot straight gun skool"

When your on a first date and she asks what your doing:
"I went to the Helen Keller Mammogram school"

Now go forth and reek havoc

Stoneage_Caddy
10-29-12, 04:30 PM
"The whole 9 yards"
This came from WW2 and was the length of the ammo belt for the ma-duece , the troops were told to "give jerry the whole 9 yards"

Submariner409
10-29-12, 04:58 PM
I don't reek of havoc, but have been known to wreak havoc on Halowe'en once in a while.

"When the going gets tough, the tough get going !" - USMC ???

"If a fig plucker could pluck figs, how many figs could a fig plucker pluck ?"

The-Dullahan
10-29-12, 08:41 PM
I wreak havoc on every Halloween. Then again, if most of you documented a day in my life and compared it to your own, it may as well be Halloween.

Here's a saying from over the weekend whilst hanging out with some friends at an event.

"We're kicking more ass than a boot in an ass factory."

Ahh, the southern flare...

The-Dullahan
03-26-14, 02:04 AM
"The whole 9 yards"
This came from WW2 and was the length of the ammo belt for the ma-duece , the troops were told to "give jerry the whole 9 yards"

:bump:

Actually, that saying predates WWII by centuries.

Men's attire is supposed to be made of nine yards of fabric. Such has it been for around the last 1,100 years at least.

This phrase is probably largely misunderstood by modern Americans, though because they wear pants instead of kilts (And everyone I know wonders why, yet none of us have determined an answer as to the choice of pants over kilts)

This brings us to another origin, though this is not a phrase, but a word.

Pansy. As in "That guy is a Pansy". Essentially, it has the same meaning as "Wimp" or "Sissy".

The phonetical connection between the word "Pansy" and "Pants" is no coincidence and both words are etymologically connected from their first use in the [Modern] English language. They actually stem from Olde English and were borrowed from Olde Irish and Gaulish (not to be confused with Gaelic, but rather a language descended from it) and into Gaelic itself.

To call someone a Pansy is literally to say that they are the type of man who would do something such as wear pants.

And Florida is full of these little Pansies.

orconn
03-26-14, 02:34 AM
I never heard a Scotsman in a kilt called a "pansy," not unless there was another Scotsman in his kilt!

Hoosier Daddy
03-26-14, 08:32 AM
To call someone a Pansy is literally to say that they are the type of man who would do something such as wear pants.
It's true. You'll never hear anyone call a man wearing a skirt a pansy.

Interestingly, skirts as a man's attire (renamed kilts by wearers to avoid being labeled pansies) came into popularity because they eliminated the need to figure out the front of the garment when dressing.

orconn
03-26-14, 12:49 PM
^^^ Obviously you've never worn a kilt. However, if you are am addicted fanny pack wearer you may be confused as to where to put the sporran.

talismandave
03-26-14, 01:28 PM
Wow, I think Orconn just implied, politely, where you can put your sporran!:farting:

The-Dullahan
03-26-14, 02:52 PM
It's true. You'll never hear anyone call a man wearing a skirt a pansy.

Interestingly, skirts as a man's attire (renamed kilts by wearers to avoid being labeled pansies) came into popularity because they eliminated the need to figure out the front of the garment when dressing.

We'll have to forgive him orconn, as not everyone has worn a Kilt, due to ethnic or cultural reasons.

Traditional skirts (like ladies wear) are actually more similar to pants than a Kilt. A kilt has a beginning and ending point and is wrapped, buckled and belted around the wearer, with the apron in the front. A skirt, much like pants, could be worn backwards, if the wearer intended. With a kilt, this would not be possible.

However, up until about a century ago, most men on the planet wore some form of unbifurcated garment, be it a kilt or otherwise. Pants being the mainstay of male dress attire is a new trend, but they are also dying off as all fads do and will eventually return back into the fifth circle of Hell, from whence they came.

----------


^^^ Obviously you've never worn a kilt. However, if you are am addicted fanny pack wearer you may be confused as to where to put the sporran.

I find it impossible to take someone wearing a fanny pack seriously, 99% of the time. Living in Florida, this is a large portion of the people.

orconn
03-26-14, 03:55 PM
^^^ Nuff said!

H-town_V
03-27-14, 04:03 AM
We'll have to forgive him orconn, as not everyone has worn a Kilt, due to ethnic or cultural reasons. Traditional skirts (like ladies wear) are actually more similar to pants than a Kilt. A kilt has a beginning and ending point and is wrapped, buckled and belted around the wearer, with the apron in the front. A skirt, much like pants, could be worn backwards, if the wearer intended. With a kilt, this would not be possible. However, up until about a century ago, most men on the planet wore some form of unbifurcated garment, be it a kilt or otherwise. Pants being the mainstay of male dress attire is a new trend, but they are also dying off as all fads do and will eventually return back into the fifth circle of Hell, from whence they came. ---------- I find it impossible to take someone wearing a fanny pack seriously, 99% of the time. Living in Florida, this is a large portion of the people.

I totally agree!!

EcSTSatic
03-27-14, 04:46 PM
I find it impossible to take someone wearing a fanny pack seriously, 99% of the time. Living in Florida, this is a large portion of the people.

Google "the in-laws fanny pack" and catch the You Tube videos from the movie about wearing a fanny pack. Movie stars Albert Brooks, Michael Douglas, Ryan Reynolds. It's hilarious!

H-town_V
03-28-14, 11:47 PM
Google "the in-laws fanny pack" and catch the You Tube videos from the movie about wearing a fanny pack. Movie stars Albert Brooks, Michael Douglas, Ryan Reynolds. It's hilarious!

Real men wear fanny packs!!!