: So what is considered "high mileage" these days?



Faded Crest
06-04-12, 12:37 AM
I grew up in the '70s and '80s and inferred from my Dad that "high mileage" was anything even approaching 100K... as if a bomb was going to go off under the hood when the odometer rolled over, and maybe that wasn't far from the truth with some cars. His generation may have had good reason to believe that all the good was gone from a car when it reached that milestone. To my Dad, even buying a car with over 50K was crazy since to him it was half used up.

Today, 100k is laughable and even considered "low mileage" by some, depending on how they define it. Heck, a Northstar doesn't even require a tune up until it hits 100K! I was just wondering when the "high mileage" alarm goes off with you guys when you see a car. For me, it's probably about 170K.

Spyder
06-04-12, 12:43 AM
Just bought an 07 Dodge Megacab with 205K on it. It's damn near brand new, being a Cummins. :D

Faded Crest
06-04-12, 12:44 AM
Well I suppose a diesel would have to be in a category of it's own... My Silver Eagle bus probably has well over a million miles.. LOL

The nicest "high mileage" car I ever bought was a '91 Brougham back in the late '90s. It had 165,000 on it and was obviously a road car. Still smelled new and showed virtually no wear. It looked like 30k miles.

Stingroo
06-04-12, 01:13 AM
Depends on condition. I generally consider 150k+ to be the skeptical zone.

thebigjimsho
06-04-12, 01:18 AM
When I sell my Town Cars with 200k+ miles(my '04 had 218k), they look much, much younger.

My '11 is nearing 90k miles and everyone thinks it's brand new.

Faded Crest
06-04-12, 01:21 AM
Wow, a 2011 with almost 100K? My Dad would just love that. :lol:

brandondeleo
06-04-12, 03:37 AM
It REALLY depends on the car and how it's taken car of, mostly. If I had to make a generalization, I'd probably say like 130k.

Jesda
06-04-12, 05:27 AM
I think of 100k as the time things come due, even though the car may otherwise run for another 50-100k. It's when neglected fluids like power steering begin to result in bad pumps, bad hoses, leaky seals, clogged lines, and worn racks. It's when differentials hum, amps and speakers in fancy sound systems flake out, power window regulators start to click and pop, and upholstery begins to show wear.

My Saab, purchased at 105k and 20+ years old, was badly neglected and left to rot for a few years. Almost everything has needed replacement or refurbishment. On the other hand, I've had used cars with 200k+ that looked and drove like new because of prior care.

bigm57ict
06-04-12, 07:49 AM
I would say mileage is just one factor I look at when considering a used car. Make, condition, use, and owner history are also important. For example, my current Caddy was a one-owner car and looked new. I figure someone who buys a brand-new Cadillac, then keeps it for 14 years probably took good care of it.

I would say a car with 8K per year or less would be considered a low mileage car. Anything over 200,000 on the odometer looks high regardless of age.

Aztec ETC ECS
06-04-12, 08:28 AM
There is a difference between "high mileage" & "high use". I've seen some cars w/50K that were ready for the crusher.

Ranger
06-04-12, 09:13 AM
I think the answer to your question is much like beauty. It's in the eye of the beholder. That said, I can identify with your father and still have a hard time shaking that 100K feeling. I'm approaching it now and have to keep telling myself it's no big deal. You know what they say about old habits. Back in the 50's and 60's when (if) they reached 100K it was time for an overhaul (if there was anything left of the body to make it worth while). Then again, back then it was just a weekend project.

talismandave
06-04-12, 09:23 AM
One thing we haven't touched on here is odometer fraud. From 1960 to 1971 my dad drove over 50,000 miles a year. He kept his cars 2 to 3 years and would trade them in. He always was honest on mileage, even when the dealers would actually argue with him wanting him to misrepresent.
I am sure none of those 2 year old cars were sold honestly. Now days with carfax it is harder to do that. Perhaps some of the increase in high mileage cars is we now know how many miles our cars really have.
He also bought a "new" 68 Buick Special wagon. While considering the purchase he stopped in to look at it and the staff couldn't find it.(?) After buying it he found a child's shoe under the seat.(?) A few months later his Gas station mechanic showed him the back of the dash where the speedo cable attached, just black, from finger prints! Who knows how many miles that "new car" had on it!

brandondeleo
06-04-12, 09:28 AM
With many new cars they've made it so you can't tamper with the odometer anymore.

EcSTSatic
06-04-12, 10:36 AM
You guys are focusing mainly on the engine. There are other systems in cars that can cost $$$ to repair. e.g. the Teves ABS master cylinder on my '88 TurboCoupe was $1K to replace. Couldn't even get the autoride shocks any more. I gave it up even though I loved that car. It only had 120K miles when I did.

thebigjimsho
06-04-12, 10:49 AM
With many new cars they've made it so you can't tamper with the odometer anymore.Incorrect. You can "shut off the dash". I've seen it done on leased trucks that run all over the country, towing and such. Trucks that should have about 50k miles and indicate such actually has 200k...

Faded Crest
06-04-12, 11:46 AM
There are a lot of reasons that today's mileage isn't the same as mileage from the '80s or so and back. Today's car bodies hold up much better than older cars because of the way the metal is treated, even though they are less substantial. Technological advances in rubber and synthetics prevent metal parts from wearing as quickly as they used to. Suspension parts are better, easing the wear and tear on front end parts. Engines last longer, tolerances are more precise, lubricants are better... (Or at least some are). Fuel delivery is more efficient, even the quality of roads are generally better today and there are more interstates to drive on. The reasons go on and on. I would say that 200K is the old 100K.

Jesda
06-04-12, 02:14 PM
The average age of a car on the road in the US is 9 years. It's a combination of higher quality and higher new car prices.

That age would be even higher if people didn't trade out of their SUVs when gas prices rose.

drewsdeville
06-04-12, 04:04 PM
This question is something that an insurance agent could answer. Most cars are totaled out before they reach the limits of mechanical ability.

The tables have turned since a few decades ago when longevity was a real concern. The numbers suggest that it's no longer important. I recently read somewhere that the average life of a car in the US is around 120k miles. Not too long ago, this was well beyond mechanical ability of the average car. Now, it's far short of that.

Todays cars can last only as long as the average motorist's driving skills allow. 99% of them will run and drive great up to the instant before they are totaled out.

Faded Crest
06-04-12, 04:43 PM
^^^ I'd say that about sums it up, Drew. I have seen several cars in the past couple years with high 200k's and even a few with over 300k, still running and driving fine. Mileage is irrelevant if you are willing to keep up with mechanical repairs.

SDCaddyLacky
06-04-12, 04:43 PM
I wouldn't mind at all purchasing a used car that had over 150k on it, if it was immaculately taking caring of and stored in a garage most of it's life. Buying a high mileage used vehicle all depends not only on how well the car has been maintained, but where that person lived and drove the car to and from everyday, the climate, road conditions, the persons age especially being a young buck. All those things are also to be taken into consideration since really even if a car has been up-kept very well, terrible pot hole riddled streets, road salt, constant rainy conditions outside can leave the car's body in bad shape over the years even for modern cars.

And now that all cars today are unibody, I would be concerned about extra body flexing when the miles rack up, and the how the car can absorb road shock. But if the owner lived in a nice area, with perfectly paved streets then it wouldn't be as much of an issue.


You can find some beaters at 60K and some beauties at 200K.


Used cars built in the last 5 years are usually good to go on forever because of the amount of technology built into them that notifies the driver when something needs to be looked into. So the driver doesn't kill the engine or transmission for whatever reasons.

The biggest problem though for me regarding modern cars, is they might be more reliable than ever before, but man do they all look like match box toy cars.:nono:

orconn
06-04-12, 04:50 PM
^^^ The quality and longevity of the cars produced today is exceptional, but for American cars there does seem to life limiting factor. Most American manufacturers stop stocking replacement parts for their vehicles after a ten year period. With each succeeding year after this cut off it becomes increasingly difficult to come up with even "wear and tear" and maintenance parts.

I understand that this is not the case with several European manufacturers, such as Mercedes-Benz, and, for sure, accounts for the extraordinary accumulation that many of their cars achieve.

I say this because I have a 1995 Seville STS which is in excellent condition and only has 78,000 miles on it, and meets all my personal transportation needs. However, I keep seeing references to several parts for these cars not being available. This gives pause as to how long this car will be viable as a daily driver!

drewsdeville
06-04-12, 05:57 PM
And now that all cars today are unibody, I would be concerned about extra body flexing when the miles rack up, and the how the car can absorb road shock. But if the owner lived in a nice area, with perfectly paved streets then it wouldn't be as much of an issue.



lolz. Then you are in for a real treat. Rigidity is unibody's greatest attribute. To simplify, think of unibody as a standard full framed car with small roll cage, except the body is welded to the frame and cage, not bolted and bushing'd

We are STILL trying to reduce torsional flexing in the few full framed vehicles produced today (US pickups, for example).

Think a few bumps in teh road will collapse a modern car? HEad over to Youtube where you can find dozens of hilarious videos of people successfully jumping unibody cars numerous times, still being able to open and close the doors afterwards. In the "related videos" pane you there will probably be a few full sized pickup jumps where the frame collapses and jams the bed into the cab.

Jesda
06-04-12, 06:42 PM
With a modern unibody car, checking for accident damage or a history is even more important. Too many rolling hack jobs out there, and the repairs aren't easy or cheap if there's hidden damage to a significant structural area.

78seville455
06-04-12, 09:55 PM
My 04 pilot has 180000 on it and is still going strong no major work, just routine maintenance. My 95 f150 has 198000 and has just recently burned a hole through # 2 piston, and my 81 rx7 has 89000 and is starting to get tired, but rotary motors are quick to wear out and awfully finicky to begin with. My 78 Seville is well 75000 going strong, but getting a big block so it doesn't matter:)

HAZZARDJOHN
06-04-12, 10:55 PM
My uncle just turned 400K with his 2000 Tahoe. original engine transmission, ball joints, tie rod ends, shocks, and very few replaced parts. It still even looks somewhat decent for a Minnesota truck that actually gets used off road.

http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b55/Johnny1107/HUNTING/2006/PA280018.jpg

In this pic it probably just turned 300K

I~LUV~Caddys8792
06-04-12, 11:20 PM
My '00 Astro AWD had 265k when my boss replaced it with a 130k mile '06 E-250. The Astro's body was in good shape, the transmission still shifted great and had no hesitation or slippage upon kickdown and the engine started every time and provided decent power (even though it felt a little sluggish compared to a lower mileage 4.3). We replaced it because it was starting to need various repairs every month, which ended up costing us more than a payment on the E-250 plus it's marginally additional fuel consumption.

The Astro was a highway vehicle, doing 800-1000 miles a week, 80% highway/ 20% city. We took care of all it's maintenance (full & complete transmission flushes every 80k miles, fuel induction services once a year, power steering service once, etc), and it never broke down or left me stranded. I wasn't terribly kind on the van and used the most of it's power, including lots of towing and heavy hauling frequently.

OTOH, I took great care of the vehicle, cosmetically. For a company vehicle, it was very clean. I would vacuum out the front cabin twice monthly, run it through the car wash 3-4 times a week. The result of that was very little dirt or rust...it always had a rust spot on right rear fender and in the 130k miles I put on it over 2.5 years, that rust spot never expanded.


ANYWAYS, "high mileage" is all vehicle dependant, but I'd say GENERALLY, 150k miles is the start of "higher mileage" for any newer car.

Aron9000
06-05-12, 12:01 AM
As has been said, all depends on how the car was maintained and where it was driven. I'm convinced cars from up north don't last as long because of rust and terrible roads in some parts of the northern US. For example, my beater Toyota truck has led a hard life for 19 years and 164k miles. But its been a Tennessee truck all its life, has NO rust, and the suspension is still pretty tight. Had this been an up north truck, I'm sure it would've been ate up with rust to the point of being unsafe by this time and all the potholes would make it drive/ride like it was completely ragged out.

Faded Crest
06-05-12, 01:02 AM
I've lived in the South so long that I have almost forgotten just how bad a northern car can be. I take it for granted that any local car I look at will look virtually new underneath, even at 20 years old. But I got a reminder a couple weeks ago when I put a fuel pump in a friend's Northern Cadillac. The crusty bits of rust that fall on your face when you are underneath, the broken bolts, flaking rust on the corners of the body flanges, etc. I have become spoiled by clean Southern cars.

Stingroo
06-05-12, 01:50 AM
Yeah... the next wagon I buy will be a native Texas car.

Mine was originally from PA, and underneath, it shows. It's not bad rust, but it's there, and I've had to fix it.

Never again.

Rolex
06-05-12, 03:13 PM
It's a good question. I had been shopping for my FIL a used vehicle for over a year (casually browsing and waiting on the right deal to come along). Vehicles local to me that advertise "low miles" in their adds and on their windows were routinely 100k-150k miles on the clock. Historically I haven't considered that kind of miles low. But if you can look under the oil cap and don't see sludge, the brakes work, the engine runs smoothly, trans shifts smoothly, and a/c blows cold, you've got as sure a bet as any used car. I agree that the look and feel of the vehicle has more to tell you about how its been maintained then the odometer.

Aztec ETC ECS
06-05-12, 09:32 PM
With many new cars they've made it so you can't tamper with the odometer anymore.
I'm gonna have to disagree and question your auto advice giving ability.

ga_etc
06-05-12, 09:39 PM
My '96 Blazer is a southern truck and respectably clean to be an older 4x4 SUV. It is ~250 miles from rolling over 258,000 and fires the first time the key is turned.

http://i685.photobucket.com/albums/vv220/austin99etc/IMAG1574.jpg

And my dad traded/bought a 2003 Silverado. From looking at the truck you would think it MIGHT have 100k on it. When I drove it the odo was showing 245k.

Maintenance is key.

brandondeleo
06-05-12, 10:13 PM
I'm gonna have to disagree and question your auto advice giving ability.
I'm gonna have to mention my apparently too-subtle-to-notice sarcasm, and question your shut-the-hell-up.

I'm also going to have to question your knowledge in general... Trying to sell a typical condition not-so-special Eldo for about $25k more than it's worth to anybody.

Aztec ETC ECS
06-05-12, 10:39 PM
No, seriously, what are your credentials?

Jesda
06-05-12, 10:47 PM
Play nice!

brandondeleo
06-05-12, 10:49 PM
I'm done. I promise. :halo:

cadillac kevin
06-05-12, 10:51 PM
Aztec, quit trolling.
Brandon, quit being an asshat to the troll


...now back to your regularly scheduled topic.

brandondeleo
06-05-12, 10:53 PM
On subject...

I can use my '04 as an example. I was in the wreck at just before 130k miles, and up until that point it never once had a non-routine maintenance repair, and it was in PERFECT shape. It was absolutely impeccable. Looked like a brand new car. It was brought into the family off of the lot, and I had all of the records. It was taken care of very well. Even the craptastic 41TE was still working right! :lol:

the recluse
06-05-12, 11:03 PM
I would have to agree with the most things said...I bought my 2002 STS with 61,810 miles on the OD and it's just coming to the 159,000 mark. 95,000+ miles and all I've spent on the car (other than oil changes and tires) is about $600 in repairs; the front wheel bearings went out, the coolant reservoir cracked, and an A/C soft line popped when the pressure sensor let go(both had to be replaced).

Now the car is about to get a complete rundown...the cradle's being dropped and ALL the suspension, braking, and steering is being done, as well as all the seals in both the engine and tranny are being replaced. The car still runs like a champ and with a good polish, shines like new...

The carriage top is another story however....I hate that thing (but don't tell the wife)...

brandondeleo
06-05-12, 11:11 PM
I would have to agree with the most things said...I bought my 2002 STS with 61,810 miles on the OD and it's just coming to the 159,000 mark. 95,000+ miles and all I've spent on the car (other than oil changes and tires) is about $600 in repairs; the front wheel bearings went out, the coolant reservoir cracked, and an A/C soft line popped when the pressure sensor let go(both had to be replaced).

Now the car is about to get a complete rundown...the cradle's being dropped and ALL the suspension, braking, and steering is being done, as well as all the seals in both the engine and tranny are being replaced. The car still runs like a champ and with a good polish, shines like new...

The carriage top is another story however....I hate that thing (but don't tell the wife)...

Post a picture!
Sometimes I like carriage tops. It depends on the specific car.

talismandave
06-05-12, 11:19 PM
My 96 Sebring had just over 100,000 miles on it when I bought it, but because they were put on on highways instead of in town it was tight and rattle free. I worked in the business and used to appraise trade-in for a living. Even things like pedal/carpet wear, door handle cups, ignition and door lock scratches, etc. would have allowed them to roll it to 40,000 and I would have believed it.93041 After five years of my driving it on Madison's pot holes it was a whole different story. That said it was still running well and resold for over half of what I paid for it with 150,000 miles on it.

brandondeleo
06-05-12, 11:24 PM
I've only seen the 3x white color combo a few times, but I imagine that the white top is a total bitch to keep clean.
Given the wheels and the lack of fog lights I'd guess it's a JX, right?

talismandave
06-05-12, 11:37 PM
I've only seen the 3x white color combo a few times, but I imagine that the white top is a total bitch to keep clean.
Given the wheels and the lack of fog lights I'd guess it's a JX, right?
Yes, and the interior was the Chrysler "Sea of Gray" when I bought it. I redyed and repainted the dash, door panels, top boot, and seats white and cobalt blue, leaving only a little gray as an accent and on the outer bolsters of seats. I also took the super reflective tape 3M makes (think back of school bus, or county truck) and covered the fog holes, and added about a mile of cobalt blue stripe tape in about 5 different widths.
Westleys Bleach White whitewall cleaner kept the top A1.

brandondeleo
06-05-12, 11:40 PM
I have a bottle of top conditioner... Keep putting it off... Haha. Do you have the vinyl top or the cloth top?

talismandave
06-06-12, 12:00 AM
Vinyl. Westleys also rocks for white running/athletic shoes!

brandondeleo
06-06-12, 12:12 AM
Vinyl. Westleys also rocks for white running/athletic shoes!
Oh, I see. I think cloth is harder to take care of. It's soft, though. :lol: I do have a pair of white shoes that could use a good cleaning.

Also, I don't think I've mentioned this to you before. http://www.sebringclub.net/board/index.php

talismandave
06-06-12, 12:40 AM
Oh, I see. I think cloth is harder to take care of. It's soft, though. :lol: I do have a pair of white shoes that could use a good cleaning.

Also, I don't think I've mentioned this to you before. http://www.sebringclub.net/board/index.php
You two timing SOB! You have been cheating on CF?:tisk:
Thanks, that was fun going through the gallery. I am partial to the first gen models. I always liked the look of the 94 Le Baron (without headlight cover) and wanted to find one. None to be had that drove well. A woman in my apt. complex had a Sebring same color combo as your's. After walking past it every day, especially in summer, I decided to look for one and got lucky to find a cheap and good one.

brandondeleo
06-06-12, 02:07 AM
We'd love to have you on there, just register and post a thread in the "Welcome!" forum. Everyone's really nice and they really know their stuff, but there are sticks up some of their asses. They actually deleted their Town Hall forum because conduct was "unbecoming." Those conversations were a pleasant politically correct walk in the park compared to CF conversations. :lol: It's a nice place to be sometimes, really.

talismandave
06-06-12, 02:44 AM
Thanks, I will keep it in mind, I waste too much time here already though! Wish I would have had a computer back when I had the car. I guess it wouldn't hurt to drop in once in a while. I really do love the cars. In fact the reason I have the Volvo now is because of another Sebring. I was doing the lot crawl around the area and in back of one I saw a 96 just like mine just taken in on trade on a BMW lot. It had 46,000 orig. on it. I called the next day drove it, tight and smooth, all white with white leather. Car had to go through safety check and then I could buy it for 2000.00. While in dealership an employee bought it out from under me. I wasn't looking for a car but that would have been such a great up grade what the heck. I expressed my displeasure and they acted like they didn't care whether a two grand buyer wouldn't be back. I went crossed the street to the Mercedes dealer and bought the Volvo from them. Three days later when I picked it up I crossed the street to cruise the BMW lot. My salesman was out on lot and came over to see if he could sell me something! I told him "You could have Monday but now I bought this."
Used 96 Sebring.....$2,000.00
Used 04 Volvo......$20,000.00
Look on salesmans face..........Priceless.

Aztec ETC ECS
06-06-12, 09:33 AM
A woman in my apt. complex had a Sebring same color combo as your's.

:cool2:

talismandave
06-06-12, 10:23 AM
:histeric:

Aztec ETC ECS
06-06-12, 11:00 AM
quit being an asshat

Asshat??
Never heard that before in the big city. I like it. I think I'll start using it!

truckinman
06-06-12, 12:12 PM
I guess to me it depends on the car. Like my STS, it had 82 when I bought it. To me that's low miles for that car. Now my fiancÚ on the other hand believes if a car averages more than 10k miles a year, it's no good. Lol. That I don't get. I mean when I was looking, I saw a couple cars with 65k but were 08s. To her that's way to much for an 08. To me, 65k miles is 65k miles. Lol. But she thought my caddy had way to many miles when I bought it.

But far as a jeep goes, I'm not worried if I buy a jeep with the old 4.0 l-6 with over 200k miles.

brandondeleo
06-06-12, 01:37 PM
But far as a jeep goes, I'm not worried if I buy a jeep with the old 4.0 l-6 with over 200k miles.
My god, why didn't I think of that? Those old Jeeps are freaking BULLETPROOF. My ex girlfriend had an '87 Cherokee that really wasn't taken care of. At all. There was one point (before I came around) where she let it go without checking any fluids and ran the oil almost dry. Leaked like a sieve. It had like 250k miles, and the damn thing just KEPT GOING. I have no idea how it did it. It was possessed or something. It's still on the road. That's the Yellow Beast behind my old car.

http://i1092.photobucket.com/albums/i419/brandondeleo/RSCN0564.jpg

truckinman
06-06-12, 02:38 PM
My god, why didn't I think of that? Those old Jeeps are freaking BULLETPROOF. My ex girlfriend had an '87 Cherokee that really wasn't taken care of. At all. There was one point (before I came around) where she let it go without checking any fluids and ran the oil almost dry. Leaked like a sieve. It had like 250k miles, and the damn thing just KEPT GOING. I have no idea how it did it. It was possessed or something. It's still on the road. That's the Yellow Beast behind my old car.



Oh they are bulletproof. Those engines were mechanical marvels far as I'm concerned. My very first jeep, a 95 wrangler YJ, 4.0, had 120k miles. Well one day came out after work. Started her up and went on my way. It was about 16 miles home from work. Got 2 miles from work, and the oil pressure gauge went to 0! I figured must just be a bad gauge. I was young n dumb at the time. Lol. 18 years old. So I drive the remaining 14 miles home like that. Get home and for the hell of it decide to check the oil.....BONE DRY!!!!! Realized that the oil gauge sending unit had busted spilling all the oil instantly. So I drove 14 miles give or take, with NO oil! Put a new sending unit on it, filled her back up, and it never made a damn noise. No knocking lifters, NOTHING! I drove it another 10k miles with out a single issue after that and traded it for a Lexus GS400. But I couldn't believe it.

Another buddy of mine has a 1995 grand Cherokee with the 4.0. Over 300k miles never rebuilt and this jeep has been rolled over twice! First b4 he bought it, which when he bought it there were less than 120k miles on it. Then a couple years ago his girl rolled it bc she hit a slick spot going 60 and hit the ditch sideways. He was with her. He called me n a few others, we drove to him, thru 2 straps over it. Hooked em to a half ton ford and yanked it off its roof onto its wheels. He drove it home with no issues but a caved roof. Lol. Popped the roof back up with jacks, replaced windshield, and kept driving it. Lol. Now its just a wheeling jeep and he drives it to work. But he cut tge roof off and the doors and made an amazing and VERY stout roll cage for it. But he's got 4 other grands that he still drives on the rd. All with 4.0 and all with right at or over the 200k mark. I love jeeps like none other. If you cant tell. Lol

----------

And just for the record, I think it was a HUUUUGE mistake for Chrysler to do away with the 4.0. The l-6 4.0 I mean. Not the one they use in the Pacifica. 2006 was last year for the l-6. That was such a tried and tested engine. Had been around since 87, ur girls 87 Cherokee being the very first jeep To receive it. The wrangler didn't get the 4.0 till 91. They were putting the 4.2 carbed l-6 into the wranglers till then. Which was a great engine too. My dad bought a brand new wrangler 87, in 86 and put over 300k miles on it in a 25 year period and never had a serious issue with that engine.

talismandave
06-06-12, 03:35 PM
My Wrangler had the 2.5 liter Pontiac "iron duke" 4cyl in it and that was a long runner too.

truckinman
06-06-12, 04:12 PM
My Wrangler had the 2.5 liter Pontiac "iron duke" 4cyl in it and that was a long runner too.

Yes sir that's a good one too. Another friend has a 92 wrangler with the 2.5. Over 300k on that engine as well and still running strong.

the recluse
06-06-12, 05:56 PM
Post a picture!
Sometimes I like carriage tops. It depends on the specific car.

This carriage top is SHREDDED! It got real cold here a couple of years ago and shrunk the top, just started pulling off in the wind one day...new top (as i am quoted) costs about a grand...not looking forward to it...

ryannel2003
06-06-12, 06:03 PM
If the car has been well maintained I wouldn't have as much a problem with the mileage really. My BMW has 140k miles on it and the motor still runs great, the transmission still shifts smooth and it handles quite well. Being German (and old) the main thing to look out for on the older cars with high mileage is parts availability and pricing. As luck would have it there are plenty of good aftermarket parts available for most cars and if you can find a good mechanic or do the work yourself then it makes sense to keep an older car or buy one with higher mileage for dirt cheap.

CadillacLuke24
06-07-12, 03:57 PM
I think it also depends on the vehicle in question.

94-99 Northstar equipped: 200k :stirpot:

Late 90s GM truck: Approaching 300K

Cadillac with the 4.9: 300K

Generally speaking, 200k is the number for me.

Jesda
06-07-12, 04:08 PM
Parts availability? Just become a weirdo hoarder like me. I'm tempted to start storing doors and windshields in my spare room.

Stingroo
06-07-12, 05:20 PM
Nice. lol

truckinman
06-07-12, 06:05 PM
Parts availability? Just become a weirdo hoarder like me. I'm tempted to start storing doors and windshields in my spare room.

Lol. I've still gotta brand new brake rotor for my Lexus that I don't have anymore. Lol. Could come in handy. Maybe make the worlds smallest fire ring outa it and make s'mores and cook hot dogs. Lol

hueterm
06-07-12, 06:49 PM
Parts availability? Just become a weirdo hoarder like me. I'm tempted to start storing doors and windshields in my spare room.

Already started....

CadillacLuke24
06-07-12, 11:36 PM
I should probably start that, considering my ambitions for Alexandra.

Aron9000
06-08-12, 12:22 AM
Parts availability? Just become a weirdo hoarder like me. I'm tempted to start storing doors and windshields in my spare room.

I had half a shed full of Camaro/fbody parts even though I didn't own one. I've thinned my collection down some, but got tired of dealing with weirdos on craigslist and dead beat bidders on ebay. If I ever get the itch to move again, that stuff is gone, I'll give it away worst comes to worst.

Faded Crest
06-08-12, 12:38 AM
Seems like the best way to insure you will never need a repair on something is to buy a spare part for it. :rolleyes:

I was cleaning the garage the other day and found a spare power steering pump for a 1959 Cadillac Sedan deVille I have not owned for well over 10 years.

orconn
06-08-12, 12:41 AM
^^^ Amen, brother, I've got a garage full of spare parts for things that never needed repair!

Ranger
06-08-12, 10:30 AM
Yup, I made a Northstar water pump socket so I would have it when the time came. That had to be at least 5 years ago. It has not been used yet.

EChas3
06-09-12, 10:39 PM
High mileage is now the distance to the moon. 225,000 on average.

My 1993 Roadmaster had 220,000 on it when I decided the repairs needed were getting out of hand. It still looked good and although the drivers seat was a bit worn, the velour interior still looked great and was very comfortable.

The venerable Chevy 350 didn't use oil, the transmission was fine and it ran great. It did need the A/C upgrade, a complete set of brakes (calipers, rotors, drums & pads) tires, some switches & a window regulator.

Part of me wishes I had fixed it but in 2004 I could still deduct the Blue Book off my taxes. That donation to Rawhide saved me thousands.

exterminate
06-11-12, 08:13 PM
I'm sure sure someone's already said this, but it depends on the make/model

CadillacLuke24
06-12-12, 02:25 AM
And the location, and the driver. For a 2008 Volkswagen Beetle in western SD with a woman driver, you'll be lucky to get to 100k :D