: 2006 sts tires



idkwhothatis123
06-03-12, 10:40 PM
Now I get this is purely opinion, but based on what you own, what's the best tire size and why. I'm looking for 20's or 22's and I don't want to sacrifice a whole lot of smoothness on the drive. I appreciate the help folks.

EChas3
06-04-12, 11:57 PM
If you have MRC, 22's or even 20's will be very sensitive to the slightest imperfections in the road.

It's your car. Enjoy!

idkwhothatis123
06-05-12, 12:51 AM
If you have MRC, 22's or even 20's will be very sensitive to the slightest imperfections in the road.

It's your car. Enjoy!

Out of curiosity, how can I tell if I do have that? And I assume you mean magnetic ride control by mrc right?

Ludacrisvp
06-05-12, 02:07 AM
Yeah. Open the hood, and look at the top of the strut towers and you will see if there's wires attached to the top of them. Wires = MRC. You may have to remove the plastic beauty panels to see this. Or in the trunk under the spare tire cover look at the RPO list for F55 this is the option code for the MRC.

idkwhothatis123
06-05-12, 12:25 PM
Yeah. Open the hood, and look at the top of the strut towers and you will see if there's wires attached to the top of them. Wires = MRC. You may have to remove the plastic beauty panels to see this. Or in the trunk under the spare tire cover look at the RPO list for F55 this is the option code for the MRC.

I appreciate the help man. If I do have this feature, would I be able to lower my car? Sorry for the dumb questions, caddy n00b.

idkwhothatis123
06-05-12, 12:26 PM
Yeah. Open the hood, and look at the top of the strut towers and you will see if there's wires attached to the top of them. Wires = MRC. You may have to remove the plastic beauty panels to see this. Or in the trunk under the spare tire cover look at the RPO list for F55 this is the option code for the MRC.

I appreciate the help man. If I do have this feature, would I be able to lower my car? Sorry for the dumb questions, caddy n00b. I just figure with 20's, lower it. 22s stay as is.

curtc
06-05-12, 01:41 PM
Lowering an MRC equipped car may cause all sorts of suspension issues, i wouldn't attempt it...Too much $$$ at risk monkeying with MRC.

idkwhothatis123
06-05-12, 04:06 PM
Lowering an MRC equipped car may cause all sorts of suspension issues, i wouldn't attempt it...Too much $$$ at risk monkeying with MRC.

I appreciate the help guys. I'll look at my car tonight after work and see what's up.

Edit: Definitely have mrc. Saw wires and looked up the part number in the trunk. Thanks for the heads up. Stock size for sure now.

EChas3
06-05-12, 09:30 PM
STS can have two styles of leveling systems. Check with D3 if lowering is your goal.

idkwhothatis123
06-05-12, 10:08 PM
STS can have two styles of leveling systems. Check with D3 if lowering is your goal.

I'm looking to lower and add 20's without sacrificing much smoothness on the ride. I think I'm wanting my cake and eat it too.

EChas3
06-05-12, 10:50 PM
It's OK to want it all; just realize that the handling, allignment, ride and tire life will suffer.

idkwhothatis123
06-06-12, 11:22 AM
I guess my next question then is the previosu owner of my car kept the staggered setup on the tires. he even bought the same tires that the oem had. will going to all one size affect the smoothness of my ride at all? i'd like to be able to rotate my damn tires and not buy new ones so often. If so, has anyone found a good size for all four?

C&C
06-06-12, 12:35 PM
Even though you can put same-sized tires on staggered wheels, remember the reason they are staggered is because the wheel widths (between front and back) are different as well; so rotation is still not viable.

dannyquest
06-06-12, 01:22 PM
I called Tire Rack and they stated on staggered set up go with what on the rear and install on front. Danny

idkwhothatis123
06-06-12, 04:49 PM
Good point. Cool. Thanks guys

scott9001
06-06-12, 07:23 PM
hey i have 22s on my 05 sts with mrc and i dont find it to bad of course on the tar and chip type of roads that suck balls arnt the greatest but 20s are probably the same way. i find if you buy 20s you have to lower it i think the wheel gap looks rediculas. Now i have 245/35zr22 and i can do lock to lock for turning no rubs and i can load the car up to go to the cottage and not worry. people state you can run 255/35 but im not positive on that. dont listen to what people say about horible alignment once lowered if you find yourself a good mechanic to do the alignment you will never notice tire wear problems! friends of mine drive slamed cars and have no issues with a proper setup. im into baggin vehicles so i always get a little bit of camber wear ;)

EChas3
06-06-12, 09:38 PM
The 17" wheels are different widths but the 18" wheels are identical. Either way, I recommend 235/50R for a more compliant ride or 255/45R for performance. The real difference in tire tread width is less than 1".

idkwhothatis123
06-06-12, 10:14 PM
The 17" wheels are different widths but the 18" wheels are identical. Either way, I recommend 235/50R for a more compliant ride or 255/45R for performance. The real difference in tire tread width is less than 1".

235/50r will give a smoother ride? I got 17's

curtc
06-06-12, 11:31 PM
A 50 will give you a smoother ride than a 45 due to there being more sidewall to absorb the bumps.

EChas3
06-08-12, 10:10 PM
Tire choice is very personal. It's the single easiest way to change a car's ride/handling dynamics. Tire Rack's site does a nice job of guiding a buyer to a suitable tire.

idkwhothatis123
06-09-12, 02:16 AM
The 17" wheels are different widths but the 18" wheels are identical. Either way, I recommend 235/50R for a more compliant ride or 255/45R for performance. The real difference in tire tread width is less than 1".

I clearly am a noob with cars. Just for clarification, even though my rears are 255/45-17 I can put 235/50's on them? I'm in for the smoothest ride.

EChas3
06-09-12, 02:42 PM
You will want to keep close to the same circumfrance (or diameter) as possible. Tire sizes are quoted as: <width in millimeters>/<sidewall height as a percentage of treadwidth>R(adial design)<wheel diameter in inches>. A 235/50R17 has treadwidth of 235mm and sidewall height of 117.5mm. Your back wheels are 1/2 inch wider than your front wheels, which most people consider close enough.

As noted earlier, all else equal, more sidewal provides a softer ride. Tire rack also rates the other factors, tire stiffness, soft or hard compounds, etc. In general a harder tire wears longer but may not provide as much traction, especially in adverse conditions.

Here's a tool to play with different tire sizes:

http://www.1010tires.com/TireSizeCalculator.asp

idkwhothatis123
06-09-12, 03:02 PM
You will want to keep close to the same circumfrance (or diameter) as possible. Tire sizes are quoted as: <width in millimeters>/<sidewall height as a percentage of treadwidth>R(adial design)<wheel diameter in inches>. A 235/50R17 has treadwidth of 235mm and sidewall height of 117.5mm. Your back wheels are 1/2 inch wider than your front wheels, which most people consider close enough.

As noted earlier, all else equal, more sidewal provides a softer ride. Tire rack also rates the other factors, tire stiffness, soft or hard compounds, etc. In general a harder tire wears longer but may not provide as much traction, especially in adverse conditions.

Here's a tool to play with different tire sizes:

http://www.1010tires.com/TireSizeCalculator.asp

Thanks for the help man. I'm going with pirelli scorpion Verde a/s. 235/55r17