: Windshield sanding/polishing?



js615
05-23-12, 11:02 AM
After 20K miles the V has some small pits and scars from road wear. Nothing major at all, but annoying consider the drive into work is in full direct sun and, as luck would have it, on most nights working late, direct sunlight on the drive home. Consequently, the view is obscured from the refraction of light on each of these numerous but very small pits.

My question: has anyone had any luck with glass sanding/polishing or clay to smooth out said pits? I've heard you can actually screw up a windshield more than help it and that the only truly effective fix is to replace the glass. I thought it might be worth a try.

Thoughts?

M5eater
05-23-12, 11:31 AM
I would clay/ razorblade first. Some (or a lot) of those may be dried-up bug gutz.

polishing can damage glass just like improper wetsanding/polishing can damage paint, but it's not damage in that it can't be repaired.

That said, I don't know of anyone that's acutally tried.

baabootoo
05-23-12, 02:32 PM
Nope, I see no hope. My insurance company replaced one on a 1987 Monte Carlo after years of pitting. In want to say I paid some small deductible.

TriTexan
05-23-12, 03:47 PM
I've seen glass polishing done on OLD (vintage) windshields on various TV shows like Hot Rod TV and Two Guys. But it's a laborious process that poduces results on older glass, but on modern glass like on our V's I wouldn't attempt it. You'll NEVER get as good a result as you will with a new piece of glass. My advice is simply to suck up the costs of a new windshield or shop around. That way you'll be assured of a good result. The other way is a gamble IMHO.

JFJr
05-23-12, 03:59 PM
I would try Liquid Glass. It will clean the glass and might help with the light refraction. I have used it on windshields before and they weren't damaged by the polish.

Jud

Blakester
05-23-12, 09:54 PM
I've heard of lite scratches being removed with jewellers rouge, again on older cars, i'm sure there would be learning curve.

js615
05-24-12, 02:50 PM
Thanks all. You all have said pretty much just what I expected.

Haze
05-24-12, 09:56 PM
I would clay/ razorblade first. Some (or a lot) of those may be dried-up bug gutz.

polishing can damage glass just like improper wetsanding/polishing can damage paint, but it's not damage in that it can't be repaired.

That said, I don't know of anyone that's acutally tried.

For bug gutz, which I assume is the technical term, I prefer a chemical option. There's a citrus based product called goo gone, that works pretty well for me. I'd try that before clay bar or a rasor just because I think that it works faster and easier. If it doesn't work, then I'd step up to clay bar and rasor, but I'm lazy like that.