: Slippin n a slidin



erichthecatt
01-11-12, 01:43 PM
I just returned from a 2800 mile trip from Calif to Montana, in my 10 sts, rwd. Up on the high mountain ranges in Montana, the roads were snow and ice packed. So im going apprx. 45mph or so on the curves and the rear of the car slides slightly, and the traction control is activated. It happened so fast, i couldnt tell if the tc actually did anything. This happened several times. The question....... If I was in my old fwd northstar, would the car still have slid? Not that it really matters since i live in an area with no snow or ice, except occasionally on the mountain passes. Just curious. I have the original tires. 30,000 miles. tread is still great. averaged 26-29.5 mpg per tank. "Road wrapped" the front of my car that looked absolutely horrible, but i didnt get any road chips on the paint. But my windshield and headlights show the battle scars.

malatu
01-11-12, 02:06 PM
All cars regardless or fwd, rwd or awd will slip, skid and or spin out when braking and or accelerating. It all depends what you are talking about. Gernerally speaking, the back end of a rwd will "fish-tail" as a result of accelerating. ... and even more so if accelerating on a curve. Where as, the fwd has much much less of a tendancy to fish tail under the same circumstance. Of course, that is a result of the front wheels pulling the car verses the rear wheels pushing the car.

If you turned off the traction control, you probably could have noticed a major difference. At least I did when first got the car and and was experimenting with it on the snowy roads in my development!

KNCadillac8898
01-11-12, 02:12 PM
I'd say anywhere above 35 you can slide in a rear or fwd. But I'd say a little less likely in a fwd. Snow tires make a huge difference. My Deville handles so good in the snow with them I actually look forward to driving in it. Even with my performance tires (smooth as all hell) I was once able to get up a hill that was covered in about an inch with help of the traction control. Best car I've ever driven in the snow.

EChas3
01-11-12, 08:50 PM
Anyone from a warm climate with a RWD STS should take caution when traveling in slick conditions. The OEM tires don't provide good winter traction and these are heavy & powerful cars. Even with traction control & stabilitrac you can get into trouble in unfamiliar conditions.

ddalder
01-11-12, 10:24 PM
Much of the success or failure in driving a RWD car on poor roads depends on the skill and technique of the operator. I have many years of driving on snow and ice covered roads in both front and rear wheel drive cars (only about a year now with AWD), RWD van and cube style vehicles. There are definitely advantages to FWD, but I've seldom had difficulty with RWD. The key is to drive according to the conditions. Without a doubt, snow/ice tires do offer better control and traction in adverse conditions regardless of whether the vehicle is FWD, RWD or AWD. In some cases, I've seen a disadvantage to 4x4's or AWD vehicles due to driver attitude. Some people feel "untouchable" in these vehicles and this gets them in trouble. It doesn't matter what you have, it's still possible to drive beyond its capabilities.

erichthecatt
01-12-12, 03:04 PM
Thanks for the input!. I usually make a winter trip to Montana every year, but really havnt had much experience on the ice. Ive never felt the rear of the car slide with my front wheel drive cars. Ive had such limited experience, i was just curious on the differance.










Anyone from a warm climate with a RWD STS should take caution when traveling in slick conditions. The OEM tires don't provide good winter traction and these are heavy & powerful cars. Even with traction control & stabilitrac you can get into trouble in unfamiliar conditions.

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Im a really cautious driver when I get into the snow and ice, sice i dont live in this type of climate. By the picture i posted, you can see what the road was like. I cant believe the people that pass me like im standing still...... driving on ice!

EChas3
01-12-12, 09:56 PM
DD - I'm certainly not worried about you! Driving a RWD is actually more intuitive overall, but these cars (with hard-compound tires) can easily surprise drivers not used to slick conditions.

Few enough STS's were built. I'd hate to read about one suffering off-road adventures. The first snow each season catch some forgetful drivers. It's that time here in SE Wisconsin.

erichthecatt
01-13-12, 10:29 AM
On this 2800 mile trip that I went on over 9 days, traveled through nevada, utah, idaho, montana, oregon and back into california. I only saw one STS on the road. And that was in Montana. I saw a few CTS's. I found that interesting there are so few STS cars on the roads. Ill never take my car up there in the winter again. I could literally see the rocks flying towards me, with every passing car and truck up there. Next year, ill be taking my gas hog 1991 4x4 gmc truck. I now have a windshield full of chips that show so nice. No cracks. I can have the insurance replace the windshield, but I hesitate having anyone mess with the mouldings and electronics on the glass. I just know its going to be screwed up.
The last windshield I had replaced on my 05 bonneville with the northstar, they placed the glass too low. That somehow created a vibrating noise in the lower windshield area. Had them change it out, the noise stopped but the glass still wasnt positioned right.