: Winterizing the Caddy



DopeStar 156
11-08-04, 02:44 PM
Looks like I'll be driving my Fleetwood all through the winter since I can't afford storage and my parents won't take one damn car out of the garage so I'm stuck. I already have an all season car cover on the car right now since I'm at school. I'm also going to use 93 octane gas for better engine performance and an oil change will be coming up fairly soon. Should I use a thinner oil for the winter like the suggested 5w30 for the 307, or should I keep using the 10w30 I've been pouring in there? Also anything else I should have done? My dad tells me a carbed car is pretty difficult to start in the winter so I just wanna make sure I won't have any trouble and I want to be sure she looks just as good in the spring as she does now. Please post any suggestions you might have. Thanky.

barge master
11-08-04, 05:22 PM
If your choke is working OK now, it should start right up in the winter. A few other ideas are, start putting a bottle of dry gas in every other tank of gas. Make sure your wiper blades are good, and that the squirters work. If you've never tried it, that Prestone de-icer wash fluid is deluxe. Make sure the brakes are OK and adjusted properly. I'm a big believer in REAL snow tires esp. with studs on a RWD car.
Give it a good pressure wash behind the rocker trim and all the places that dirt hides, and a good coat of wax. You might want to invest in a cheap set of mudflaps, just for the winter. They keep the sand off the rocker chrome. Psuedo-rednecks {like me} soak the whole underneath of the car with drain oil to stop rust, but I won't even go there with you Dope...

JAKE91
11-08-04, 05:51 PM
Looks like I'll be driving my Fleetwood all through the winter since I can't afford storage and my parents won't take one damn car out of the garage so I'm stuck. I already have an all season car cover on the car right now since I'm at school. I'm also going to use 93 octane gas for better engine performance and an oil change will be coming up fairly soon. Should I use a thinner oil for the winter like the suggested 5w30 for the 307, or should I keep using the 10w30 I've been pouring in there? Also anything else I should have done? My dad tells me a carbed car is pretty difficult to start in the winter so I just wanna make sure I won't have any trouble and I want to be sure she looks just as good in the spring as she does now. Please post any suggestions you might have. Thanky.

DUDE, POUR SOME PAINT THINNER IN THE RADIATOR FOR BETTER CIRCULATION. :histeric:
:burn:

Ralph
11-08-04, 06:59 PM
Looks like I'll be driving my Fleetwood all through the winter since I can't afford storage and my parents won't take one damn car out of the garage so I'm stuck. I already have an all season car cover on the car right now since I'm at school. I'm also going to use 93 octane gas for better engine performance and an oil change will be coming up fairly soon. Should I use a thinner oil for the winter like the suggested 5w30 for the 307, or should I keep using the 10w30 I've been pouring in there? Also anything else I should have done? My dad tells me a carbed car is pretty difficult to start in the winter so I just wanna make sure I won't have any trouble and I want to be sure she looks just as good in the spring as she does now. Please post any suggestions you might have. Thanky.

Check the coolant strength! With our Pontiac a few years back I cracked a radiator because it was -40 and there was probably too much water to coolant ratio. (it was running outside for an hour when this happened)

With previous cars I've been ok with 10-w30, but have used the thinner 5 W30 in the past with same results. Would you consider running Mobil 1 10 w 30 in winter? I ran Mobil last year and was GLAD I did because of record -59 weather! We were the coldest place on the planet last year! We all know that synthetic is not supposed to freeze up at extremes. (according to the Mobil bottle)

Make sure the tire pressure is up because the colder it gets the faster they lose pressure it seems. Right now I got my Caddy on 33 pounds per tire because I don't want to play around with a valve in -40 weather and get a stuck valve=flat tire.

Good coat of wax NOW, while you can. I like synthetic caranuba by Prestone.

Windshield washer fluid top-up.

Gas line antifreeze a must! Top all fluids.

Gently tighten all rad hose clamps, 3/8s tranny cooler lines, heater hoses, etc. But not too tight! I usually get a few drops hanging off a hose or two because rubber likes to contract with cold, and you don't want to lose much fluid, etc. Check condition of fan belts for cracks, fraying, etc.

That's all I can think of for now.

barge master
11-08-04, 07:24 PM
If anybody should know winter it's you Ralph. -59... my ever lovin' mother of misery. I would kill myself up there. Rat poison, hose on the tailpipe, shotgun to the face all at once. :rofl: :vomit: :dammit: :banghead2

Ralph
11-08-04, 07:29 PM
If anybody should know winter it's you Ralph. -59... my ever lovin' mother of misery. I would kill myself up there. Rat poison, hose on the tailpipe, shotgun to the face all at once. :rofl: :vomit: :dammit: :banghead2

LOL!! It's not that bad. We have lotsa pretty women to keep us company up here, as you can see. :lildevil: :shhh:

We have to be careful NOT to slam a car door too hard because the windows can shatter at that temp!

Sucks to be me. :helpless:

DopeStar 156
11-08-04, 08:35 PM
Wow. I'll definately get on some of those. I'm worried about salt especially in NJ rusting some of my perfect chrome. I've seen what road salt can do to a chrome bumper before, it's nasty. Also my undercarrage has some rust and I don't want anything under there to rot. I might just be paranoid thinking the crap that happens to a car over several winters will happen to mine after one, I dunno. The tires I'm not too concerned about since mine are only 6 months old and I don't do burnouts in them. If I can help it I won't drive my Caddy, I've got my Malibu for that, but my dad also intends to use that so there'll be some days I'll be stuck. My radiator fluid is mostly Prestone antifreeze so I'm not concerened about that either. he fluids are all topped off already and the wipers and washers work perfectly and are on 6 month old blades. I'll buy a bottle of Prestone De-icer which is what I had in my Lincoln (When the squirters worked) and that stuff cleared a windshield in seconds. But I won't let too much snow on the car since I intend to cover it when it's parked at home. The power steering hose and belt need changing as well as the fuel filter so I'll get that done as soon as I can. I'm just so concerned about everything. I just want the car to survive the winter.

Spock
11-09-04, 04:23 AM
You can undercoat the car to prevent the rust, it's a good investment every year.

Also I would suggest putting sandbags or better yet as barge mentioned getting studded tires for your rear wheels. I've been using sandbags, and when it's icy, sorry to say the Cadillac doesn't stack up. The rear is so light compared to the front it's not even funny. I though initially when I purchased the car it would handle the same as a station wagon in snow and ice, nope. Skids galore! Hopefully I can get some studded tires for my caddy this year with the sandbags and that should help more.

Be careful making turns, easy on the accelerator and if there's a slight incline with ice on it DON'T STOP WARP SPEED MAN! WARP SPEED!

(has been stuck in his parking lot many times)

klebrun
11-09-04, 05:43 AM
You can undercoat the car to prevent the rust, it's a good investment every year.

Also I would suggest putting sandbags or better yet as barge mentioned getting studded tires for your rear wheels. I've been using sandbags, and when it's icy, sorry to say the Cadillac doesn't stack up. The rear is so light compared to the front it's not even funny. I though initially when I purchased the car it would handle the same as a station wagon in snow and ice, nope. Skids galore! Hopefully I can get some studded tires for my caddy this year with the sandbags and that should help more.

Be careful making turns, easy on the accelerator and if there's a slight incline with ice on it DON'T STOP WARP SPEED MAN! WARP SPEED!

(has been stuck in his parking lot many times)

But Capin', she cannot take Warp 8 much longer...intercooler temperature is approaching critical! If we keep this up she'll blow apart any minute!!!

juiceE
11-09-04, 12:13 PM
:yeah: :deadhorse

luddyludwick
11-09-04, 01:44 PM
Klebrun,

Just wondering, where is the "warp speed" button on my HT? I hear there's something you can buy that claims to give you "the performance of a normal car" (I think it's called a 500ci big block), but I didn't know they came out with warp drive conversions yet...(could you only get that on the 307 or LT1?)

:D

klebrun
11-09-04, 03:51 PM
Klebrun,

Just wondering, where is the "warp speed" button on my HT? I hear there's something you can buy that claims to give you "the performance of a normal car" (I think it's called a 500ci big block), but I didn't know they came out with warp drive conversions yet...(could you only get that on the 307 or LT1?)

:D

I feel your pain. In the words of the immortal Dr. McCoy, "It's dead Jim".

Pianoman72
11-09-04, 04:36 PM
Does everyone else think bumping up to 93 octane is worthwhile? I think you might be wasting your money there. Just go with whatever octane the manufacturer recommends.

I like the concept of sandbags in the trunk but from my experience the sand spills out and also the bags need to be tied down somehow or else they go sliding around.

klebrun
11-09-04, 05:37 PM
Does everyone else think bumping up to 93 octane is worthwhile? I think you might be wasting your money there. Just go with whatever octane the manufacturer recommends.

I like the concept of sandbags in the trunk but from my experience the sand spills out and also the bags need to be tied down somehow or else they go sliding around.

I had the same question that you do about higher octane fuel a few years back. My old Chrysler was pinging like crazy. The manual called for 87 octane, but I had to use 91 to quiet it down. I talked to a mechanic friend of mine and he said that as engines get older, they accumulate carbon deposits in the combustion chamber, usually on top of the pistons, which in turn causes a slight compression increase therefore creating the need for a higher octane fuel. Seemed to make sense, but then again I don't know much about tearing down an engine.

Night Wolf
11-09-04, 10:15 PM
yeah, the '77-'92 DeVille/Brougham is very front heavy... my mothers '89 Brougham likes to slide around alot... with studded snow tires...

I never have, and never will drive my '79 on snow, salt, or any other kind of bad winter weather (proabably not in the winter at all, unless to take it for a quick spin) but in the rain alone, that car can be bad enough...

... the salt does eat at cars... once it starts, it'll keep going. I'll second the mudflap idea... I had to drive my '93 thru 1 or 2 snow storms last year... that was with the really, really, really extremly crappy tires... that was scary... anything besides a down slop, and if i try to accelerate the tires would spin... the the millisecond I touched the brakes, ABS would go crazy etc... it wasn't the car.. but those crappy tires (because they sucked in the rain big time too)

So that is why I bought a winter car... which I then really liked, and keep it on the road all the time.... 1989 Oldsmobile Eighty Eight Royale.... the car has the tires it came with.... old Good Years on the front... ok tread, worn Fire Stones on the back... eh tread.... I have never once got the car stuck... no ABS no problem... that car climbed snow covered hills like no other... I dunno what it is, if it is the car or the tires.. or both, but it was unstopable in the snow... until I hit ice around a turn and sideswiped a telephone poll and went *thru* a snow bank higher then my car ont he side of the road.... then put it in reverse and backed right out.... even leaning agasint the telephone poll and nothing but snow under the car, it backed right out... just like when I was driving in an open field, snow was coming up over the hood, and it didn't show any signs of getting stuck.... damn what a great car :)

If you can, just don't use your car... my mothers '89 Brougham was mint when she got it... daily use and 6 NY winters later.. it is really showing it... and wash the car 1-2 times a wekk, it would probably be best to go to an auto carwash becuase they have underbody washes.... and don't park it too close to the road... that happened with my mothers car, adn the salt from the snow plows... plowing got thrown on the car and ruined all the paint.... white spots everywhere... the paint was flawless, and a very rare color... but it is ruined.... and the Rolls Royce grille is all fadded and stuff.... and the rear bumper is starting to rust... and the body has an area where it is starting to rust.... and...and.....

You could probably get a 1988 Honda Civic for like $300, use it in the winter, do a tune-up and stuff, then sell it in the Spring for... $300.... or keep it if you plan on living in NJ for awhile... only use it as a winter car... or keep it on the road all the time and enjoy 40mpg :)

Night Wolf
11-09-04, 10:18 PM
I had the same question that you do about higher octane fuel a few years back. My old Chrysler was pinging like crazy. The manual called for 87 octane, but I had to use 91 to quiet it down. I talked to a mechanic friend of mine and he said that as engines get older, they accumulate carbon deposits in the combustion chamber, usually on top of the pistons, which in turn causes a slight compression increase therefore creating the need for a higher octane fuel. Seemed to make sense, but then again I don't know much about tearing down an engine.

very true... especailly true with older, carburatoed, distruburtor, no knock sensor engines...

my mothers '89 Brougham calls for 87.... it is a 307... if she uses 87 it'll ping like crazy... so she has to use 93.... although maybe with the work we are doing (big tune up and stuff) it'll run on a lower grade again.....

OTOH my '79.... the 425 runs on regular fine... even running it wide open and stuff.... then again, with 8.2:1 compression, it better run on regular.... I go back and fourth between 87 and 93 though... '93 DeVille only gets premium... Olds (last winter) got premium... now I run regular... it'll run fine on it... plus has a knock sensor... maybe I'll go to 89 or 93 if I feel like it... probably not...

DopeStar 156
11-10-04, 12:31 AM
Well like I said, I have a 99 Chevy Malibu that I'll most likely use when it gets nasty out. I'll prolly drive my Caddy only when the weather is decent. I also have a lengthy driveway so it'll be out of the road's way of salt flinging trucks and such. I dunno, I just want the Caddy to survive in the same splendor she has now.

Spock
11-10-04, 01:10 AM
I feel your pain. In the words of the immortal Dr. McCoy "It's dead Jim".
"Don't you worry Captain we'll beat those Klingon devils even if I have to get out and push..." :halo:

klebrun
11-10-04, 02:13 AM
"Don't you worry Captain we'll beat those Klingon devils even if I have to get out and push..." :halo:

LOL!!! :histeric:

RBraczyk
11-10-04, 01:13 PM
Cinder blocks or 45 pound weights work well. Don't keep them in for any longer than you need to, or it will damage your springs.

DopeStar 156
11-10-04, 09:05 PM
Excellant, excellant. I'll definately weigh the back down some.

ELDORACER
12-05-05, 12:30 AM
with the ping try to use a top engine cleaner and follow the directions on a thread posted "Cleaning your engine of evil carbon" this helps a lot with cold weather knock aka piston slap.

DopeStar 156
12-05-05, 01:06 AM
Haha dude that was like a year ago. It doesn't do that anymore. Actually the Fleetwood is sleeping this winter.