: ok.not even sure how to say this but i sold the V for a Volt. Let the hits begin!



aburd
10-04-11, 11:43 PM
Loved the V.
Ran it hard,
Had fun,
Got tired of walking bye it every day on the way to work (37 mil commute).
will be back.

but the volt is pretty amazing for the price. just a different post to digest.

burd

thebigjimsho
10-05-11, 12:51 AM
There is a V d00d that used to frequent these forums who tracks his V along with a number of his cars. He's tracked his Volt, too...

deckofficer
10-05-11, 01:19 AM
You got my thumbs up. I would have kept the V, only use it for trips, and with trip only use, it would be like a one year old V in 2035, and worth a mint. I have (3) electric vehicles and love the plug and play aspect to them. Tires and windshield washer fluid, that is about it. With regen, I'll never need a brake job. Here is my Electric Smart Car. The charger is under my coat in the rear cargo area.


And PLEASE show us pictures of the dashboard panel readouts.

http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff452/deckofficer/Electric%20Smart%20car%20%20%20%20going%20green/DSC00653816x612.jpg

http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff452/deckofficer/Electric%20Smart%20car%20%20%20%20going%20green/DSC00656816x612.jpg

translux
10-05-11, 01:27 AM
I always feel compled to want to pull the smart car back and let it go.
What were those car from when we we kids, zips?

Anyway I think I'm going to get a Volt as well.
Really want a Tesla or a Karma but I think these are along way off if ever.
I really like the option of the gas motor.
It's about 1/2 the cost per mile on a charge vs gas correct?

translux
10-05-11, 01:36 AM
Maybe the Tesla is not that far away
http://www.autoblog.com/2011/10/04/2012-tesla-model-s-beta/

deckofficer
10-05-11, 01:43 AM
The Tesla Model S is right around the corner, coming out of the old Toyota plant in Fremont, now owned by Tesla. The 0~60 in 3.6 second Roadster has been in production for a couple of years. A good friend has one, lives in San Jose (Silicon Valley), and is able to drive to his cabin in King's Beach, North Shore Lake Tahoe, a summit of 7400' all on a single charge. It is 230 miles, and if he drives with the flow of traffic for 2/3's of the trip, he can do some spirited driving the final 1/3. He enjoys that aspect, the more he takes it easy crossing the valley, the more he can romp, crank and bank pulling the mountain.

Bob

deckofficer
10-05-11, 02:51 AM
The Tesla S will retail at $49,900 with 160 mile battery, $59.900 for 230 mile pack, and $69,900 for 300 mile pack, about the same price as the V.

e6t
10-05-11, 10:52 AM
electric cars are awesome.

i had a tesla scream past me the other day coming off a highway offramp. came out of nowhere, like a ninja.

Junior1
10-05-11, 11:26 AM
I always feel compled to want to pull the smart car back and let it go.
What were those car from when we we kids, zips?

Penny Racers :burn:

aburd
10-05-11, 11:30 AM
It cost me $1.07 to charge over night here in missouri. It covers my 37 mile round trip commute instead of 7$ in gas/ day ( silverado mpg).

neuronbob
10-05-11, 12:46 PM
It's funny, aburd, I have thought about adding a Volt to my garage too. Rock on, bro! Too bad you couldn't keep the V too.

Speedtrapped
10-05-11, 01:15 PM
hmmmm, I am too old fashioned.....I love the scream, the burble when I let off the gas, as for torque a proper ac motor on each wheel can be scary. That said, anyone ever watch the topgear special on electric cars? Pretty funny, range was awful, and lack of infastructure, ie charge stations made it a hassle, as the battery gets close to drained, the time to charge grows. I think in the future an alternative is viable, but riddle me this....If we swapped 33% of gasoline engines for pure electrics, tell where the juice is coming from? Hell we cant even build nuclear plants in this country(I am not in the industry), wind/solar, bah ha, I think when Arnie tried to set up a wind farm in Mnts of Cali, every enviroemntal culub went nuts on transmission lines running thru forrests. Our current grid is old, and barely able to keep up with demand now. Btw, coal/oil provide the majority of fuel to turn the turbines....
Smart car, 6'-4" frame, I wonder what I would look like after a head on collision...sorry as I said I am old school.

stabie
10-05-11, 02:17 PM
I too like the volt. Nice looking, batteries low give it a low COG for better handling and mileage/performance is ok. The gas engine backup for range and high speed direct boost is also clever for power bump. The only down side of all of this is at the moment EV's are not only getting a incentive, but they also do not pay a fuel tax to support roads. That free ride cannot last forever. Expect a mileage tax at some point to replace gas tax for road maint. It has to happen. Even fossil fueled cars are bumping their mileage to the point where the tax collected for road repair is going down. It is not sustainable.

amunderdog
10-05-11, 03:19 PM
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-bloggers/2784017/posts
http://green.autoblog.com/2011/09/20/china-to-gm-give-us-chevy-volt-secrets-or-itll-cost-19-000-mo/
http://nlpc.org/stories/2011/09/25/chevy-volt-production-create-green-jobs-%E2%80%93-china
"In a nutshell, taxpayers fund GM and GE for electric vehicle development, GM sells Volts to GE, GE makes money building charging stations for Volts, GM moves EV development to China. What a racket!"

Political veiw point.
http://www.rushlimbaugh.com/daily/2011/09/27/gm_ge_and_the_chicoms

I would not go anywhere near that mess.

If i had any notion of going that direction i would look here first.
2012 Ford Fusion Hybrid
And i have never been a blue oval fan.
Manufactured at Ford's Hermosillo Stamping & Assembly plant, located in Sonora, Mexico:(
http://www.ford.com/most-fuel-efficient/?searchid=64584685|2100144205|3472996196~110624-bicfuel-red
http://www.ask.com/wiki/Ford_Fusion_Hybrid

undertaker
10-05-11, 09:12 PM
I wasn't wild about the volt's pricetag and new technology and range (and I'd be paying the electric bill anyway)

So I went to the other side......TDI...bought a VW jetta TDI cup edition. Essentially the diesel, with the sport suspension big rims and an aero package. Since I'm usually doing 80-90 mph into work 50 miles each way I'm not complaining with the usual 35+ or low 40's if I'm stuck in traffic not passing around 65-70.....compared to my 2500 suburban I was using to commute, or the 800 rwhp vette if it was nice it literally pays for its 500 a month payment in gas savings. 50 bucks gets me about 500 miles.

The caddy, well I didn't buy it for economy, its the weekend warrior road trip car now, still debating if I'm keeping the vette after I swap the 550 rwhp C5R 427 from my gutted track car into it since I popped the boost motor and thats all out and going bye-bye.

Besides I'm tight on garage space now, lol.

JFJr
10-05-11, 09:59 PM
Ok, you asked for it. Why would any self-respecting high performance car enthusiast even think about, much less own, a sorry electric car? Maybe you really aren't an enthusiast. Your reasons thus far are no excuse. Are you a liberal? That would provide some explanation. There's nothing worse than a self-righteous Prius owner.

Prof
10-05-11, 10:04 PM
I think a Tesla is in our future. Wife is the R&D boss at her corporation...she feels an obligation to be an early adopter of new technology. She drives a Prius now. The Prius has had to have two tail light bulbs and two headlight bulbs in 65k over the past five years. Great vehicle, and I have hopes that the Tesla will provide the same kind of experience. Her electric vehicles allow me to create a larger carbon foot print, with an SRT 10 and a CTS V. Now that is carbon trading at its very highest level if you ask me!

Speedtrapped
10-05-11, 10:24 PM
Ughh, really, carbon footprint? I am weeping inside. God bless lamborginhi and the V12... That sucking sound your hear is gasoline......

voltrons_head
10-05-11, 10:30 PM
81301

nsaness
10-05-11, 10:35 PM
wanna race?

deckofficer
10-05-11, 11:20 PM
Ok, you asked for it. Why would any self-respecting high performance car enthusiast even think about, much less own, a sorry electric car? Maybe you really aren't an enthusiast. Your reasons thus far are no excuse. Are you a liberal? That would provide some explanation. There's nothing worse than a self-righteous Prius owner.

I guess you can feel any way you want about electrics, but in no less than 20 years, 1/3 of all new cars sold will be electric. My V is my trip car, my T is my fast car, and my electric is my plug and play car. No smog, fuel, exhaust, filters, cats, trans, oil, and all torque available at zero rpm. And more than likely no brake pad replacement, just tires and washer fluid. If I want to rip, and a lot faster than the V, then I'm in the T. What part of high performance enthusiast am I missing, other the design and build of 10 second rocket that corners at 1.04 and can break 30 mpg? And yes, I am a liberal, because I feel what makes others happy and what they do is their business, not mine.

Junior1
10-06-11, 12:55 AM
So I went to the other side......TDI...bought a VW jetta TDI cup edition. Essentially the diesel, with the sport suspension big rims and an aero package.

I've raced the TDI Challenge cars, actually pretty cool to rip around in...
81325

undertaker
10-06-11, 01:05 AM
I've raced the TDI Challenge cars, actually pretty cool to rip around in...
81325

Its more respectable than a car you plug in the wall!!!

JimmyH
10-06-11, 02:29 PM
Nothing wrong with the Volt. I couldn't see myself paying that much for that kind of car, but someone has to before they become more affordable. I commute 90 miles a day in a gas guzzler, so you are the more sensible one.

Speedtrapped
10-06-11, 03:50 PM
it sort of reminds me of the fat guy(I qualify, 6-4" 260lbs) who goes to Mcdonalds, big mac, supersize fries, apple pie, and oh yeah I will take a diet coke with that....
I'm sorrry I just cant get my head around a V owner buying any electric car. Again, old fashioned

JimmyH
10-06-11, 04:04 PM
I am the other way around. Salad, whole grain noodles, and a 32oz Mountain Dew.

Speedtrapped
10-06-11, 04:22 PM
^^^ Lol, thats funny...mountain dew, dual purpose beverage, lots of sugar and caffiene...ok back on topic.

deckofficer
10-06-11, 11:28 PM
it sort of reminds me of the fat guy(I qualify, 6-4" 260lbs) who goes to Mcdonalds, big mac, supersize fries, apple pie, and oh yeah I will take a diet coke with that....
I'm sorrry I just cant get my head around a V owner buying any electric car. Again, old fashioned

We are the same body frame, and I'll order fast food with a diet beverage only because after you become accustomed to diet drinks, the others are too sweet and sticky. I do have a question for someone that can't see a driver owning a V and a electric car. Would you be more willing to accept that V owner having a 1923 Track-T? I'm guessing, yes. If for some reason fuel was to spike 300% or there was severe fuel shortages, wouldn't you want at least one car that would not be affected?

aburd
10-07-11, 01:29 AM
Well I guess I asked for it. To make it short I enjoyed my c5 z, V1,and V2. I just had some priorities change for now. It has nothing to do with how much I love or don't love muscle cars I can afford whatever I want but thanks for the insightful comments jfjr.
It's just a car and there will be another. I appreciate all of the cool, helpful people on this forum.
Burd.

Prof
10-07-11, 08:11 AM
Electric vehicles are the future. Some of us will hold dearly to our internal combustion treasures...kind of like my MOPAR friends with their old huge hemi engines...that simply cannot compare to the engine in my V2...but I am a MOPAR freak too...and I understand the love while embracing the future.

JFJr
10-07-11, 09:20 AM
Some sort of electrical power may be the future for cars (airborne and/or ground based), but certainly not the crude and complicated hybrid systems we see today. Practical and plentiful fuels such as hydrogen will probably lead to the demise of internal combustion engines. But until that becomes mainstream, internal combustion rules. A lot of us won't be around for the switch. Hell, we don't even know with certainty how the power grid will respond to a lot of electric plug-in's. Why not embrace present refined internal combustion technology?

Jud

RippyPartsDept
10-07-11, 11:07 AM
Smart car, 6'-4" frame, I wonder what I would look like after a head on collision

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CJHpUO-S0i8

RippyPartsDept
10-07-11, 11:16 AM
I think a Tesla is in our future. Wife is the R&D boss at her corporation...she feels an obligation to be an early adopter of new technology. She drives a Prius now. The Prius has had to have two tail light bulbs and two headlight bulbs in 65k over the past five years. Great vehicle, and I have hopes that the Tesla will provide the same kind of experience. Her electric vehicles allow me to create a larger carbon foot print, with an SRT 10 and a CTS V. Now that is carbon trading at its very highest level if you ask me!

http://www.engadget.com/2011/10/06/tesla-model-s-test-ride-and-factory-tour-video/
3 telsa model s videos here

http://www.engadget.com/2011/10/06/tesla-model-s-test-ride-and-factory-tour-video/
plus this video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZaaDSKkagA

deckofficer
10-07-11, 12:07 PM
Hell, we don't even know with certainty how the power grid will respond to a lot of electric plug-in's.

Jud

But we do, and the end result will be cheaper electricity for all consumers. Currently consumers have to pay the huge price for the infrastructure we have, that had to be designed for peak loads. With off peak charging of electric cars you will start to see consumption that can hold a steady line instead of the huge peaks and valleys in output we have now. It will be a simple matter of constantly flexible rates through out each 24 hour cycle. The power company sends to all the consumer's computers what the current rate is, and your computer instructs heavy loads in your home and garage (for charging your EV) when to cycle on or off, helping the power company help its self for load leveling. Much cheaper to size a 100 MW generation facility for a 100 MW constant load than to have to size a 1,000 MW plant to handle peak loads. The power company will also inform your computer at what rate through the day it is willing to pay you to use some of the stored energy in your vehicle's battery bank to meet its load profile. Works a little like this, you put in the set points on what cost per Kwh you will want your charger to come on, and at 1:00 AM the power company has a surplus so it lowers the rate that meets your set point and the EV starts receiving a charge. At 6:00 PM you come home with 3/4 of a "tank" and plug in, the power company needs some extra juice and again via the computer starts upping the price they are willing to pay to meet demands and if that amount reaches your set point, then your EV will contribute to the grid. This isn't my idea or fairy science, but is in fact what the power companies are now gearing up for. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out the huge increase in savings to both the consumer, and huge increase in profits to the energy producer, if the infrastructure only needs to be as large as what would be needed on average for a 24 hour period, and not PEAK.

Prof
10-07-11, 12:26 PM
Just imagine what a smart and efficient grid could do for our energy needs...the issue is: are we willing to invest now, so that we can have that smart and efficient grid available as soon as possible? I for one certainly think this is one of the things that should be surfaced as a "must do now project" that serves lots of current and future needs.

wfo
10-07-11, 12:44 PM
2011 Subaru AWD WRX STI.

Live in Texas.

With the payment diff between the two, I bought an escape place, a sweet town-home in Northern California with cool temps, places to roam and the craggy coast line minutes away for an early cup of coffee when I'm there.

Life's short, play hard.

Now you go do it your way.

deckofficer
10-07-11, 01:32 PM
2011 Subaru AWD WRX STI.

Live in Texas.

With the payment diff between the two, I bought an escape place, a sweet town-home in Northern California with cool temps, places to roam and the craggy coast line minutes away for an early cup of coffee when I'm there.

Life's short, play hard.

Now you go do it your way.

And of course Patrick's Point State Park. Your right, great area and some of the best pot is grown there.

deckofficer
10-07-11, 01:34 PM
Just imagine what a smart and efficient grid could do for our energy needs...the issue is: are we willing to invest now, so that we can have that smart and efficient grid available as soon as possible? I for one certainly think this is one of the things that should be surfaced as a "must do now project" that serves lots of current and future needs.

Nice thing, "we" don't have to invest, the power companies will because of the excellent return on investment.

JFJr
10-07-11, 02:35 PM
I love technology and leverage the best in my business. But technology is only a means to an end, not an end itself. My problem with current electric car technology is that it is crude, outdated and doesn't go far enough. Just like our energy policy, in general, it is stuck in mediocrity. For example, why don't we get international support and build giant solar arrays in orbit that tap the unlimited solar power available from our sun, for use on earth? The technology is already here.

What we need is a quantum leap in car propulsion in order to sideline the internal combustion engine which has served us so well for over a century. Hydrogen fuel cell cars are being built in the experimental stage and there are other technologies just over the horizon. With limited resources we have to prioritize things. Energy independence projects are the most important and could tie into, and promote, advanced car technology. We are wasting our time with hybrids. These are politically correct Rube Goldberg devices hiding under mundane facades. Owning one is more about boosting one's self-esteem (if you really need that) than supporting meaningful advances in technology.

Jud

deckofficer
10-07-11, 05:50 PM
Jud,

I would also like to see large strides instead of small steps the hybrid represents, but until battery technology moves forward in either energy density vs mass or in its ability to take a fast charge, we are stuck with the small steps. The small steps do help prove in steps, the technology. Regen braking, engine shut down at slow speeds or stopped in traffic whereas the AC, power steering and other components still work for you during engine off cycles. Hydrogen, even though the by product is harmless water as oxygen recombines with the hydrogen, the only current way to produce hydrogen without using electrical energy is to employ a oil product in the process. Why do you think the oil companies tout hydrogen? If hydrogen was produced using electricity, more is needed to produce than what the hydrogen will produce in return. If you use green energy to produce the hydrogen, at least the finished product would also be green, just not too efficient.

Speedtrapped
10-07-11, 06:11 PM
Seriously, I assume now and the near future oil/coal and god forbid nuclear produce most electrical output. I will say it once and again, to have a coherent energy policy then simplify the process. Anyone can google stories of wind farms at sea being squashed, or for that matter inland, what about my view?, the birds?? When an electrical transmission line route was proposed for a wind farm, the sierra club and others killed it in California, because it ran thru forest. Electromagnetic wave pollution, ya know what smart grids will be based on, RF devices in appliances. Unless you propose we stop flying, and I assume some here like the new CAFE standards on the thread, ya can't be fossil fuel. Btw, if ya think the govt and not the mkt should determine mileage standards, then I suppose owning a V is a dirty little secret you all share. Come on, I paid a gas guzzler tax for gods sake! I knew the mileage sucked, I wanted high performance, again god bless the V8 supercharged.

JFJr
10-07-11, 08:44 PM
Jud,

I would also like to see large strides instead of small steps the hybrid represents, but until battery technology moves forward in either energy density vs mass or in its ability to take a fast charge, we are stuck with the small steps. The small steps do help prove in steps, the technology. Regen braking, engine shut down at slow speeds or stopped in traffic whereas the AC, power steering and other components still work for you during engine off cycles. Hydrogen, even though the by product is harmless water as oxygen recombines with the hydrogen, the only current way to produce hydrogen without using electrical energy is to employ a oil product in the process. Why do you think the oil companies tout hydrogen? If hydrogen was produced using electricity, more is needed to produce than what the hydrogen will produce in return. If you use green energy to produce the hydrogen, at least the finished product would also be green, just not too efficient.We have been living in mediocrity a long time. To use an example, when did GM develop the last electric car before the Volt, in the 1980's? We have been taking baby steps for quite a while in automotive technology. When does technology really start improving? Do consumers hold it back?

I used hydrogen as an example because it is the most plentiful element in the universe, not the cheapest to produce. There are other emerging technologies to discuss, but not here. Technology can solve some of hydrogen's production problems.

IMO hybrids are a step backwards. Thank God for high performance V-8's; their sound can be imitated but the total sensation is hard to replicate. If you ever had the experience of being one with a machine (car or plane) you will understand.

Thanks to all of you for being patient with me. I enjoy being the devil's advocate at times.

Jud

deckofficer
10-07-11, 10:39 PM
The above car you mention was the EV1 and the first battery bank was lead acid, then later nickel-metal hydride. It was brought to market because of California's goal that all major car manufactuers had to sell 2 % full electric in California. Remember this is the state that forced the whole country to un-leaded gas, so Detroit took this mandate seriously. Ford produced an electric Ranger in 1998 to meet this new regulation. Both Detroit and the oil companies decided the best action was to file suit against California, and the rest is sad history where GM forced the return of all the leased (none were sold, GM's decision) EV1s back to GM where they were crushed. A bad chapter in our automotive history, watch the movie "Who killed the electric car".

Consumers don't hold back the technology, but dirty little tricks by big oil does. Venture capitol is what gets emerging tech going, and if your a major oil company, how do you legally dry up this influx of capitol? You just create a shell company that promises a energy storage break through in the form of a special capacitor. EEStor in Cedar Park, Texas (yes, Texas, that alone should have been a red flag), did just that, and probably for 5 years, stalled out a billion investment dollars for companies like A123 and others that were having LiPo battery breakthroughs.

stabie
10-07-11, 11:43 PM
I'm not really a believer in the big oil conspiracy. I think batteries are hard. Face it gas is wonderful stuff. Enormous amount of energy that is easy to store and doesn't blowup spontaneously. Hydrogen has storage issues. CNG is not too bad, but the C is compressed. Again, not nearly as simple as gas. Ethanol takes as much energy(petrol) to produce as it replaces. Electricity means batteries and battery tech is tricky. Just ask people who have had laptops blow. The tesla's and volts both do an awful lot of temperature sensing to make sure the charge/discharge of the battery does not overheat the pack. Lithium supply is also going to be tricky. I think most easily available is in bolivia who struck a deal with china. We were left out. Rare earths which are needed for the motors are also going to be tricky. We don't like the dirty mining, china did not mind and cut prices causing all other mines to close down. Then they started cutting people off. Japan luckily had a big supply when the brew-haha over the fishing vessel happened and china cut them out completely for awhile. Renewables are always around the corner. I just saw an article today on graphene being able to create electricity thru a hot electron effect at room temps when struck by light. To date solar has been photo-voltaic effects. I've also seen stories on using algae to create diesel using various techniques. None to date have been commercially successful. Face it alot of dino's died so we could have cheap energy. Too bad nobody has come up with cold fusion:)

Oops, forgot the capacitor part. Actually caps might not be a bad idea for prius style systems. Batteries have much higher losses than a cap for a charge/discharge cycle, so caps might be interesting for cars using regenerative braking. You could return more of the energy from braking to getting the car moving after the stop.

deckofficer
10-08-11, 01:01 AM
I wasn't a believer in the big oil conspiracy, otherwise I would have never gone to work in that industry after graduation from college the second time in my 40's. I graduated 3rd in my class, so was courted by many head hunters, with the oil industry offering by far the most generous compensation package. Having worked in the industry, their tactics are worse than anything that could come out of liberal's mind. So yes, I am convinced now that big oil is only about greed, they proved that first hand to me. After leaving the oil industry, I was more focused than ever on other methods of propulsion for personal transportation.

stabie
10-08-11, 11:39 AM
I've worked for large & small companies. I doubt oil is any worse than any other. At one company the president's favorite book was the art of war. He lived it. I don't expect morality from CEO sociopaths. I think if oil found a viable solution using batteries/hydrogen/bio they would not hide it, they would exploit it for profit. They would price it just under the cost of oil and drive their competitors out of biz. I believe its just hard, and no one has found "it" yet. ICE's have been around for a long time now. Wankel's sounded good, but didn't work. Direct injection is the latest power/eff booster to ICE's. Who knows, maybe someone will come out with another clever idea. Take for example HP's latest memrister tech. It really is looking like it may work, and if it is as good as the hype, will display flash in a couple of years. Its been a researchy device for awhile now and HP figured out how to reduce it to practice and if it really is as good as they are saying, will even displace DRAM/SRAM in a few more years eclipsing current memory architectures by integrating memory onto the CPU. Imagine if a memory access was almost as fast as a CPU register. Now that will be a disruptive technology in the currently blah computer world.

JimmyH
10-08-11, 01:30 PM
Electric cars are great. But the battery technology doesn't exist. I believe this, because if we had halfway decent battery technology in this universe, we would have smartphones whose battery life spanned more than half a day.

deckofficer
10-08-11, 07:02 PM
You must have a bad battery in your smart phone. I still have the original iphone, so you know my battery is getting old, but it is still good for 3+ days. Not the 6 days it could do, but it is older than 5 years.

JFJr
10-08-11, 08:13 PM
I can't pass this up, as much as I should. I have an iPhone 4 and after 2 days it's getting a little low. But then I still work for a living. That involves a lot of e-mail and cellular calls. What is your experience? Battery technology is still way behind; enlighten us.

Jud

JimmyH
10-08-11, 08:31 PM
I have to charge my 3GS everyday. Assuming I just use it for calling/text/email. Even then if I use it heavily I get close to shutdown by late in the day. If I do any videos or gaming I will have to charge it sooner.

deckofficer
10-08-11, 08:48 PM
Are you using it more than this?........................

Talk time: Up to 5 hours on 3G, up to 12 hours on 2G
Standby time: Up to 300 hours
Internet use: Up to 5 hours on 3G, up to 9 hours on Wi-Fi
Video playback: Up to 10 hours
Audio playback: Up to 30 hours

RippyPartsDept
10-08-11, 10:44 PM
I have a 3GS too. It's currently at 49%

I rarely get low enough to have to use my battery pack.

Every once in a while i think it's good to run it down all the way.

deckofficer
10-09-11, 02:46 AM
I have a 3GS too. It's currently at 49%

I rarely get low enough to have to use my battery pack.

Every once in a while i think it's good to run it down all the way.

Running all the way down is old NiCad thinking. LiPo will last much longer with shallow discharges. The times I could site going 6 days on a charge was because I just forgot to charge for that time. Normally I'd charge on the 2nd day.

KenLand
10-10-11, 04:17 AM
Make sure you put your Volt in Sport Mode! (tap the mode button twice) Not a V by any means, but the 100% torque from zero puts a smile on my face. The great thing is I can drive hard every chance I get and my daily cost goes from say .50 of electricity to say .75. (As opposed to $7-$8 bucks per day in my manual CTS)
BTW, if you've driven a Volt NOT in Sport mode - it's a completely different car. It goes from something faster than a Prius to something actually fun to drive.

Prof
10-10-11, 08:02 AM
Battery technology is not where we want it. But most technology improves over time. As I mentioned earlier, early adopters drive the funding of R&D.

To the point made above of big business not being trusted...as much as I don't want to, I have to believe that much of big business does not have a "why" for existing other than doing something that creates profit as a result of their "How" and "What" mentality. I have long advocated an amendment to our form of capitalism...every significant corporation (maybe once they exceed $10 M in revenue) be mandated to have a 501 (c) (3) arm codified in their By Laws. These not for profit arms would contribute to the local community in terms of research, education, social issues and the funding would be part of operating expense of the for profit. The board of directors of the for profit choose the Why, How and What of the non-profit.

Interesting old TED Video on Why, How and What:

http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/eng/simon_sinek_how_great_leaders_inspire_action.html? awesm=on.ted.com_Sinek&utm_campaign=&utm_medium=on.ted.com-static&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_content=awesm-publisher

KenLand
10-10-11, 05:54 PM
Battery technology is not where we want it.[/url]

In the Volt, battery tech is good enough that the cost savings of electricity vs. gasoline takes care of the bulk of the lease payment. My wife is the primary driver and as long as gas is greater than about 3.80 she's driving a free Volt.

And like I said - in SPORT Mode - it's a blast to drive.

elphil
10-10-11, 06:37 PM
Under CAFE it's the sale of Volts, and cars like it, that allow GM to produce the gas guzzlers we love so much. I hope GM sales a ton of the Volts.

deckofficer
10-10-11, 08:47 PM
Under CAFE it's the sale of Volts, and cars like it, that allow GM to produce the gas guzzlers we love so much. I hope GM sales a ton of the Volts.

Now there is the right attitude.

Speedtrapped
10-10-11, 08:57 PM
Let's hope CAFE goes with every other hair brained regulation next year. The mkt will dictate what cars sells, not an EPA standard. The volts sales goal for 2011 is 10k units, sorry but its not likely to make it. Maybe I'm not opened minded, but a big fat govt rebate for this car is another $ out everyone's pocket. Tesla, fisker at least designed beauties. But iirc tesla got a fat govt loan guarantee, so if we don't want to be out more $, ala Solyndra let's hope tesla sells the he'll out of there car. Gas guzzler tax was hard enough to swallow, but the V is worth every penny. And if someone was/is concerned about the cost of gas, u shouldn't be driving this car.

aburd
10-10-11, 09:32 PM
i never said i sold my v because of the cost of gas. the volt is a car i want to drive daily for my commute.

KenLand
10-10-11, 09:32 PM
One thing most poeple don't realize about the Volt is that it is NOT an Obama Green Initiative. It's GM's (more specifically Bob Lutz's) answer to the Prius. It's the result of market driven competition.
You'll notice when the subsidies run out that the price will come down appropriately. Simply a testament that such subsidies don't work, but hey you can't blame GM for taking the free money while it lasts. My point is that if you actually drive a Volt (in Sport Mode) and look at the numbers its very competitive and easily stands on its own merits.

It's a shame its caught up in the cross fire between the anti-govt-intrusion crowd and the elitest envrinmental crowd who generally despise American companies and their products.
I fall into the first group but happened to be a fan of Maximum Bob and followed and ultimately drove (and liked!) the Volt. That's why I try to urge people to give it an actual try. It's a great product born of free market forces that deserves a serious look.

Speedtrapped
10-10-11, 10:37 PM
I am sorry. I should of pointed that out. I realize GM had this car in development for a while. And from my 1st reply, I'm just a purist and love combustion, especially forced air. Ask me in 20 years, if there is fast(easy with electric) stylish(starting to exist) with a power system that lasts longer then 100 miles on a charge, I'm in the NE, remember when car and driver ( one of the big car mags) tested a volt in winter the range was awful. Everyone should like what they like. I think it's cool that u are enjoying, in the end thats all that matters. Btw I think lutz is great visionary.

deckofficer
10-11-11, 12:38 AM
i never said i sold my v because of the cost of gas. the volt is a car i want to drive daily for my commute.

aburd,

I'll bet when you started this thread, you didn't think it would go 5 pages in no time. What you and I know, most the others can only speculate, and that is all available torque at zero rpm is a real kick in the pants. And at some later date, there will be an electric equivilent to the V, but unlike our ICE Vs, will have a 200 hp motor in each wheel, total fast sampling computer checking tire slip and shifting power at will to the tires that at any given instant, has the best traction. Taking off as fast as physics will allow, is just a matter of mashing your right foot and let the computer do the rest. Folks will look back at the V and think it rather crude, just as we in 2011, look back at a '64 Ford Galaxy 427 4 speed, and think it was crude.

JimmyH
10-11-11, 01:51 PM
The skateboard car.

aburd
10-11-11, 03:10 PM
Ya sport mode was surprisingly fun and made me once again glad I went with the volt

Z06ified
10-12-11, 03:20 PM
I've seriously thought about getting a Volt too, especially after I get my new solar system installed on my house in December. However, I already own 3 vehicles (4 including my wife's), and I'm not going to add another one. Which means something in my stable would have to go: my Suburban I need, so that's staying, my '02 Z06 and '10 CTS-V are just too much fun to let go, and my wife has shown no interest in driving a Volt. So, I think I'm going to hold off for now. If really pressed, I would probably get rid of the Z06 because of it's age and lack of practicality. But I've been having so much fun with it, it would be really tough to part with it.

Now with the announcement of the Cadillac ELR, I'm thinking of waiting some more, skipping the Volt, and going with that instead, especially if it looks anything like the Converj concept. By then, I may have an all Cadillac fleet: an Escalade ESV (to replace the Suburban), my '10 CTS-V, and the ELR. Well, mostly Cadillac: my wife wants a BMW 335xi.

RippyPartsDept
10-12-11, 04:32 PM
it's going to look a lot like the ELR they showed when they announced

http://cadillacmagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/cadillac-elr.jpg

which does look a lot like the converj

http://www.finesttech.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/cadillac_converj_front_view_3.jpg

can you tell the difference?







































i can't