: Tires for Daily Driver



bjazz69
09-27-11, 10:53 PM
I plan on using my V as a Daily Driver, I live near Chicago so we get "some" snow. I was wondering what people are doing for tires? I know that the best solution is to have a second set of wheels with winter tires. My finances are limited and was thinking of getting all seasons tires. Is it worth getting? If so which ones are good? If it is a waste then I will just have to bite the bullet and get wheels and winter tread.

Hockeyref
09-28-11, 12:17 AM
I plan on using my V as a Daily Driver, I live near Chicago so we get "some" snow. I was wondering what people are doing for tires? I know that the best solution is to have a second set of wheels with winter tires. My finances are limited and was thinking of getting all seasons tires. Is it worth getting? If so which ones are good? If it is a waste then I will just have to bite the bullet and get wheels and winter tread.

I had the same issue with my previous car, but after a winter with all-seasons on a front wheel drive and then comparing to my wife's car with winter tires (fwd as well) I would never go back to all-seasons in the snow (I live in Manitoba). I bought Bridgestone Blizzaks for my '06 V and put them on the original rims, got Hankook EVO 12's with chrome rims for summer. I just got my car in March so only drove in a bit of snow but the blizzaks are awesome. I highly recommend them. Spend the extra cash and you won't be sorry when the white stuff flies!

Sullyfx
09-28-11, 12:32 AM
Agree with above

AAIIIC
09-28-11, 12:53 AM
There are so many variables involved in the decision that (IMO) it's tough to tell you what the "right answer" is. I'm assuming that you know how to drive in the snow if you grew up in that area. Growing up "back in the day" I learned to drive and made it through the New England winters in a RWD full-size station wagon on what passed for snow tires back in the 80s. Any modern all-season tire would have better snow traction than those old snow tires. Add in the fact that you're driving a modern car with ABS, traction control, and stability control, and I think you can survive just fine on good all-seasons if you know how to drive.

Dedicated snows would be better, of course, but whether you need that additional snow performance is the question. Are the roads cleared quickly? Do you have any experience driving a RWD car in the snow, and if so, are you good at it? Do you have other travel options (public transportation, friends, rideshare program, whatever) if conditions get really crappy? Can you afford to spend $800+ on a 2nd set of tires that you're only going to use a few months a year? Do you have some place to store the "extra" tires that are off the car?

mstrjon32
09-28-11, 06:16 AM
I have Bridgestone Potenza RE960AS's (all-season) on my car. Great tires--smooth and quiet all the way to the top speed, lots of grip, so far they have demonstrated excellent tread life...but they are NOT all-season tires. I tried to drive the V once in about 1/2 an inch of snow and repeatedly got stuck. My recommendation to you is, if you're going to drive in snow, either get yourself a really good set of snow tires, or buy yourself a Jeep and plow through 18"+ inches. :)

Twitch
09-28-11, 09:23 AM
Snow in NYC is a crap shoot. Couple years ago my car hardly saw any snow. Last year we really got dumped on. My Dunlop wintersports worked great.

One thing I think about is no matter how good/quick they plow the streets, they can't get everything. If you need to get pulled out of something, the tow truck driver has to lay in the (probably dirty) snow and dig under your car. Are you gonna trust him to take his time finding a good spot to hook onto?

I know it's tough paying all that extra money when it can to towards fun stuff. But having done it a few years ago, I'm glad I have that piece of mind.

Aurora40
09-28-11, 11:29 AM
I've heard good things in general about the Conti DWS, and the Goodyear F1 all-season. But I did what you are hesitant to do, and got winter wheels/tires. Even here in Virginia it's been great. Dunlop Wintersport M3's have been excellent in the white stuff, and still a decent drive when it's clear. Mine is also my daily driver. We have all-seasons on our FWD cars and sometimes they aren't that great depending on the type/quantity of snow. We get a lot of ice here too, due to the often above freezing winter days and below freezing winter nights.

I almost feel like you could drive the Wintersports year-round. Though I don't know if they'd get greasy in the summer. I suspect they might wear pretty quickly and possibly be less useful the following winter.

repenttokyo
09-28-11, 01:26 PM
I had the same issue with my previous car, but after a winter with all-seasons on a front wheel drive and then comparing to my wife's car with winter tires (fwd as well) I would never go back to all-seasons in the snow (I live in Manitoba). I bought Bridgestone Blizzaks for my '06 V and put them on the original rims, got Hankook EVO 12's with chrome rims for summer. I just got my car in March so only drove in a bit of snow but the blizzaks are awesome. I highly recommend them. Spend the extra cash and you won't be sorry when the white stuff flies!

i have this exact same combo for winter/summer minus the chrome rims - I have two sets of stockers.

thebigjimsho
09-28-11, 02:11 PM
Yeah, I almost bought a set of the Conti DWS tires for the V2 last year. Just something to run in the winter that does OK in the snow and won't kill my handling on good and cleared roads. And my V isn't a DD. I may do that this winter.

Otherwise, the V is parked and I drive my Town Car everywhere...

AAIIIC
09-28-11, 02:28 PM
I split DD duties between the V and a Subaru, so if it gets crappy, I can always drive the Subie. With that in mind, last year I replaced my dedicated snow tires with some all-seasons. My thinking was basically the same as bigjim's - the all-seasons are a helluva lot better on cold pavement than summer tires, and I'm not afraid to drive the car in wintry conditions if I need to.

Again, there are just a lot of variables that play into the decision, so it's tough to tell someone else what the right answer is for their situation.