: Deprogram TPMS?



onlyuscars
07-26-11, 10:17 PM
I have one totally malfunctioning (---) TPMS sensor, and one that always reads (13 lbs). In addition to this the wheels/tires are stacked in my shed until winter. Then I will either get the TPMS fixed or removed? Checking air pressure regularly with gauges for 20+ years worked fine.

Can I somehow deprogram the TPMS and get the warnings to go away? :confused: After driving for an hour or so the idiot light goes away. The battery cable trick did not solve this one. While writing this it dawned on me that this could be a singular fuse to pull?

Any help would be appreciated!

onlyuscars
07-26-11, 10:25 PM
Can I begin the matching process and stop at the point where I would be setting the first tire and stop to get a reset?

EChas3
07-27-11, 10:53 PM
You can get replacement sensors from Tire Rack. I can't recall anyone ever turning off the TPMS warnings.

cwcaddy
07-27-11, 10:58 PM
You can't turn off the light until you replace the sensor. And most shops will not remove the sensor unless they ate replacing it due to it's against federal law to do so. You can be fined by the cops if you get pulled over for some thing else and they see the warning light is flashing. I have to tell customers this every day. Now the chance of you getting fined over It is very slim .

dkozloski
07-29-11, 05:37 PM
I bought a replacement sensor at NAPA and replaced it myself at home using ordinary hand tools. Of course I have about 60 years experience breaking down flat tires and fixing them out on the road. You only have to break the bead on the outside. I used a couple of 18" screwdrivers for breaking the bead and a couple of Irwin quick clamps to squeeze the bead back far enough to get the old sensor out and the new one in. To get the bead to seal so I could air the tire back up I used a couple of wraps of nylon rope around the circumference of the tire with a twister in it like a Spanish windless. I used a cheapy cigar lighter air compressor. If an old fart like me can do it, surely you young bucks that know everything already can do it too.

hammer489
07-30-11, 01:15 AM
You can't turn off the light until you replace the sensor. And most shops will not remove the sensor unless they ate replacing it due to it's against federal law to do so. You can be fined by the cops if you get pulled over for some thing else and they see the warning light is flashing. I have to tell customers this every day. Now the chance of you getting fined over It is very slim .

That is a pile of nonsense propaganda

dkozloski
07-30-11, 03:58 AM
TPMS is mandated by federal law as a result of the underinflated Ford Ranger tire fiasco. Disabling or modifying a federally mandated item has the possibility of a fine. It's more serious than removing a tag from a mattress.

hammer489
07-31-11, 02:32 AM
http://www.nhtsa.gov/cars/rules/rulings/TPMSnprmPost2Cir/TPMSnprmPost2Cir.html

My interpretation of this Federal motor vehicle safety standard applies to the manufacturer of vehicles in the U.S. after a certain date. I am very interested to see particular instances of persons being cited under this federal mandate for non or *mal* functioning TPMS under state OR federal law within the state him/her reside in.

While I may see the validity in the original posters comments that it is unlawful for a dealer of the manufacturer of vehicles in the U.S. to disable such systems, I am very eager to see that a vehicle owner may be cited for a non or mal-functioning system.

hammer489
07-31-11, 02:45 AM
My interpretation of FMVSS, in particular, the "sun screening" portion of new motor vehicles manufactured for U.S. "import", would mean every passenger vehicle in the U.S. with sun screening mateials below 70% VLT, would mean persons residing in the state of TX per say would be subject to fine if his/her vehicle did not conform to such standard.

http://www.berksweb.com/users/dmv/tint/fmvss205.html

dkozloski
07-31-11, 04:47 AM
http://www.nhtsa.gov/cars/rules/rulings/TPMSnprmPost2Cir/TPMSnprmPost2Cir.html

My interpretation of this Federal motor vehicle safety standard applies to the manufacturer of vehicles in the U.S. after a certain date. I am very interested to see particular instances of persons being cited under this federal mandate for non or *mal* functioning TPMS under state OR federal law within the state him/her reside in.

While I may see the validity in the original posters comments that it is unlawful for a dealer of the manufacturer of vehicles in the U.S. to disable such systems, I am very eager to see that a vehicle owner may be cited for a non or mal-functioning system.
I wouldn't be worried about a traffic citation from a LEO but I would be worried about some shyster lawyer using it as a basis for a personal injury lawsuit after a roll-over traffic accident as the result of an under-inflated tire. As ridiculous as it would be you'd still have to defend yourself.

Greg00coupe
07-31-11, 09:24 AM
I had mine replaced at NTW. In the conversation he volunteered that they remove them all the time. This was the same place that told me they would not reset my check engine light because of some court ruling. I'm sure you can easily find someone to remove them. I too would be interested if you pulled them then got the error message if it could be eliminated by pulling a fuse. There is an antenna somewhere too but disconnecting it would not be an answer.

All this federal mandated stuff........... someday when they get this drive by wire / radar stuff figured out it will be illegal to actually drive your car.

cb1111
07-31-11, 08:28 PM
You can't turn off the light until you replace the sensor. And most shops will not remove the sensor unless they ate replacing it due to it's against federal law to do so. You can be fined by the cops if you get pulled over for some thing else and they see the warning light is flashing. I have to tell customers this every day. Now the chance of you getting fined over It is very slim . Horsemanure.

TPMS have been mandated by the Feds since the traditional 2007 model year. While it is illegal for a dealership to disable the sensors, nobody has ever gotten a ticket for having a "TPMS light" on. It sounds like you work at a dealership and it is just downright crappy information like this that gives dealers a bad name.

JimmyH
07-31-11, 09:17 PM
I wouldn't be worried about a traffic citation from a LEO but I would be worried about some shyster lawyer using it as a basis for a personal injury lawsuit after a roll-over traffic accident as the result of an under-inflated tire. As ridiculous as it would be you'd still have to defend yourself.

Ol koz makes an excellent point. Never thought of that. But in our litigation happy culture I could easily see that happen.

JimmyH
07-31-11, 09:20 PM
If you are looking for quick and cheap fix, get some replacement sensors off eBay. Match them to the car. Then get a jar with a strong lid. Put the sensors inside. Put an air fitting on the lid. Fill it with pressure. Throw it in the trunk.

onlyuscars
07-31-11, 10:25 PM
Thanks guys....I just returned from a weekend roadtrip. This equaled no idiot light annoyance for 2 days.:cool2: Tomorrow morning when I'm off to work I'll be back to the yellow tire warning again.:mad:

onlyuscars
07-31-11, 10:31 PM
Explorer, no?
TPMS is mandated by federal law as a result of the underinflated Ford Ranger tire fiasco. Disabling or modifying a federally mandated item has the possibility of a fine. It's more serious than removing a tag from a mattress.

cb1111
07-31-11, 10:46 PM
Explorer, no? Of course it was the Explorer/Firestone debacle and wasn't the fault of either. The problem was caused by severely underinflated tires. If the driver's side front tire ran off the pavement at highway speeds, the driver overcorrected and then ran back into the ditch then the SUV could roll over.
Studies have shown thatmost drivers never check their tire pressures. We have to legislate to the dumbest amongst us so we get things like TPMS.

The sensors are not a replacement for frequent checks as you"ll only get alerted when the pressure has dropped 25% - enough to wear tires abnormally.

JimmyH
07-31-11, 11:29 PM
I would tell you all how I am going to proceed, but can't because some shyster lawyer may be reading this. He could then deflate my tires and stage an accident to go after my assets. Also possible is that the vehicle service supervisors(SS) will notify the TPMS police and they may break down my door in the middle of the night and drag me off to tire inflation concentration camp.

I would say how ridiculous that sounds, but then, shysters are probably capable of just about anything. Forum trolling inclusive.

JGarten
07-31-11, 11:36 PM
It's probably least expensive (and aggravating) to just replace the bad transmitter. I read that guys mounting custom wheels (sans TPMS) just wait for the light to go off all by itself. I read that it's a transmitter proximity thing. Keep all four transmitters away from the vehicle long enough and the light will go out and never come back on (similar to what you experience on your extended drives with a bad transmitter). Bring any one back in range and TPMS starts working again (so store them far away, like 200+ feet, not in the garage). This requires new wheels or physically removing the transmitters, which raises wheel balancing issues. It might be possible to disable the transmitter by cutting the battery power some how...but, again, it's probably least expensive (and aggravating) to just replace the bad transmitter. TPMS is not a bad thing after all.

JimmyH
07-31-11, 11:48 PM
It's nice to see there is a flat tire as soon as you start the car, instead of being a block down the road feeling the thwap-thwap-thwap.

dkozloski
08-01-11, 02:17 PM
One solution is to own a car with indirect TPMS. Instead of pressure sensors it monitors rolling radius of the tires with the wheel speed sensors. The problem with this system is that a long hard climb on a snow covered road induces a slight, constant wheel slippage that the system interprets as a low tire. You can't win for losing.

onlyuscars
08-01-11, 09:32 PM
I drove a 1996 4wd 5-speed Explorer Sport for years. I was repeatedly airing the tires down and up for off roading in the sand. This weakened the side walls and I suffered a high speed blowout in the left lane on the left rear. She wiggled a little, but neutral and a mild correction got me away from the Jersey barrier and off to the side of the road for a tire change.

I guess if you didn't grow up doing donuts in the snow you could have flipped it, but I thin cb1111 has it right.

onlyuscars
08-01-11, 09:40 PM
My shed is too close! I have a plan, I will implement soon.
It's probably least expensive (and aggravating) to just replace the bad transmitter. I read that guys mounting custom wheels (sans TPMS) just wait for the light to go off all by itself. I read that it's a transmitter proximity thing. Keep all four transmitters away from the vehicle long enough and the light will go out and never come back on (similar to what you experience on your extended drives with a bad transmitter). Bring any one back in range and TPMS starts working again (so store them far away, like 200+ feet, not in the garage). This requires new wheels or physically removing the transmitters, which raises wheel balancing issues. It might be possible to disable the transmitter by cutting the battery power some how...but, again, it's probably least expensive (and aggravating) to just replace the bad transmitter. TPMS is not a bad thing after all.

dkozloski
08-02-11, 02:38 PM
Another complication is that a TPMS doesn't report until after the car has been driven 20MPH as a battery saving measure. You'll have to tie your jar of sensors to a string and whirl it over your head as you drive down the road.

turnerbend
08-02-11, 04:01 PM
You can't turn off the light until you replace the sensor. And most shops will not remove the sensor unless they ate replacing it due to it's against federal law to do so. You can be fined by the cops if you get pulled over for some thing else and they see the warning light is flashing. I have to tell customers this every day. Now the chance of you getting fined over It is very slim .

I find this hard to beleive....

turnerbend
08-02-11, 04:08 PM
It's nice to see there is a flat tire as soon as you start the car, instead of being a block down the road feeling the thwap-thwap-thwap.
Not if the system is not working.....

turnerbend
08-02-11, 04:12 PM
I drove a 1996 4wd 5-speed Explorer Sport for years. I was repeatedly airing the tires down and up for off roading in the sand. This weakened the side walls and I suffered a high speed blowout in the left lane on the left rear. She wiggled a little, but neutral and a mild correction got me away from the Jersey barrier and off to the side of the road for a tire change.

I guess if you didn't grow up doing donuts in the snow you could have flipped it, but I thin cb1111 has it right.
You more than likely had a tire that was low in pressure that cause your blowout.

JimmyH
08-02-11, 05:08 PM
Another complication is that a TPMS doesn't report until after the car has been driven 20MPH as a battery saving measure. You'll have to tie your jar of sensors to a string and whirl it over your head as you drive down the road.

I don't know about all cars, but I know it works on the 1st gen CTS-V. Many guys who change wheels frequently use this technique.

cb1111
08-02-11, 10:48 PM
It's probably least expensive (and aggravating) to just replace the bad transmitter. I read that guys mounting custom wheels (sans TPMS) just wait for the light to go off all by itself. I read that it's a transmitter proximity thing. Keep all four transmitters away from the vehicle long enough and the light will go out and never come back on (similar to what you experience on your extended drives with a bad transmitter). Bring any one back in range and TPMS starts working again (so store them far away, like 200+ feet, not in the garage). This requires new wheels or physically removing the transmitters, which raises wheel balancing issues. It might be possible to disable the transmitter by cutting the battery power some how...but, again, it's probably least expensive (and aggravating) to just replace the bad transmitter. TPMS is not a bad thing after all.
That is incorrect.If the system doesn't detect the sensors then it is required to continue to display the error.

cb1111
08-02-11, 10:55 PM
One solution is to own a car with indirect TPMS. Instead of pressure sensors it monitors rolling radius of the tires with the wheel speed sensors. The problem with this system is that a long hard climb on a snow covered road induces a slight, constant wheel slippage that the system interprets as a low tire. You can't win for losing. That's wrong too. Indirect systems do not comply with the law.

The major downside of the indirect system is that it measures the rotational speed differences between the wheels and therefore cannot account for seasonal pressure loss.

cb1111
08-02-11, 11:01 PM
I drove a 1996 4wd 5-speed Explorer Sport for years. I was repeatedly airing the tires down and up for off roading in the sand. This weakened the side walls and I suffered a high speed blowout in the left lane on the left rear. She wiggled a little, but neutral and a mild correction got me away from the Jersey barrier and off to the side of the road for a tire change.

I guess if you didn't grow up doing donuts in the snow you could have flipped it, but I thin cb1111 has it right. The Explorer issue was caused by a variety of factors, most unrelated to the car or the tires. Had any of the factors been missing then there was no catastrophic failure. In your case, the blowout was a rear wheel and you never ran off the pavement.

cwcaddy
08-03-11, 01:13 AM
Hammer489 my guess is you don't work in the industry I do I do not like the fact myself . But it is the law I've seen it myself. If a customer comes in to my shop with a broken sensor and chooses not to replace it . They have to sign a waver or release form. That makes me liable for nothing if they get caught with it like this

cwcaddy
08-03-11, 01:18 AM
Cb1111 as a matter of fact I do not work for a stealership and I happen to know of 1 person how got fined for having a damaged sensor. Got pulled over for speeding cop saw the light and nailed him. Tried coming after us and we had the waver he signed. To bad for him but that's the only time. As I said chances are very slim

cb1111
08-03-11, 01:53 AM
Cb1111 as a matter of fact I do not work for a stealership and I happen to know of 1 person how got fined for having a damaged sensor. Got pulled over for speeding cop saw the light and nailed him. Tried coming after us and we had the waver he signed. To bad for him but that's the only time. As I said chances are very slimThat is completely impossible. He may have been cited for having a tire with low pressure, but he did NOT get a ricket for having the TPMS light on his dash.

Spreading this type of incorrect information just makes you look bad.

If anything, he got cited for a low tire as "unsafe equipment" but there is no law in any state that would allow a ticket for a TPMS warning light. The car might fail a state inspection for a dash warning light but it is not a ticketable offense.

cwcaddy
08-03-11, 12:23 PM
Cb1111 well I'm sorry to tell you it happened cause if you have a bad sensor the light flashes not just stays on that's how they know you have faulty sensor. So saying I'm spreading false info on here is wrong of you so unless you have seen evidence of not getting fine I suggest not spreading bad info on someone else on here .if I don't know about something I don't just make things up and out them on here that's not what I'm about. This is for info to help other owners not talk trash about them.

JimmyH
08-03-11, 02:02 PM
That's not what I meant. I was dumb to post that. I deleted our posts as I don't want this thread going that direction. I would have pm'd you, but pm is broken right now.


Let's everyone keep this thread about tpms sensors, not about law enforcement please. Thanks.

JimmyH
08-03-11, 04:40 PM
ok then