: '67 Sedan Deville Restoration - A.K.A. Get Motivated



rjgeyer
07-06-11, 09:46 PM
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3427/3934574676_40533c398a_z.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/rgeyer/3934574676/)
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Okay, it's been over a year since I even [URL="http://www.nslms.com/2010/04/08/caddy-hibernating-for-the-summer/"]blogged (http://www.flickr.com/photos/rgeyer/3934574676/) about my caddy. I need MOTIVATION to get it back together.

So here's the short story, you can catch the details in my blog posts (http://www.nslms.com/category/cars/1967-cadillac-sedan-deville/) about the car.

I bought a '67 Sedan Deville back in June 2009, at the time it appeared to "only" need a replacement water pump in order for me to be able to drive it and repair/restore it as I went along. In fact, I was so sure that it was going to be a fairly frequent driver that I bought wheels and tires to put on it.

Not long after that, I replaced the water pump and had the Caddy idling in the driveway. Punching the throttle to get it off of high idle, the throttle stuck.. I was able to get the pedal off of the floor before the engine rev'd to death, but immediately following that, I heard a distinct "clunking" sound from the engine.

Many weeks and diagnostic steps later, I finally pulled the engine to find a washer (http://www.nslms.com/2010/02/02/mystery-solved/) folded up inside the #8 cylinder.

More time passed, I got the transmission rebuilt, reassembled the engine with some vital new parts. That brings us up to when I stopped blogging, and started to lose steam. That's where you all come in.

I did manage to get the engine all back together and buttoned up with some new parts (timing set, water pump, spark plugs, rebuilt carb) and even took the heads to the machine shop intending to have hardened seats installed. As it turns out, the heads have already had this treatment. That evidence, combined with the overall condition of the engine internals, and the markings (http://www.cadillacforums.com/forums/other-cadillac-engines/205971-67-429-main-conn-rod-markings.html) on the connecting rods and main caps, leads me to believe that this was a recently rebuilt or overhauled motor.

So I've got an assembled (newish) motor, a rebuilt trans, and (almost) all of the parts I need to put it back together. But I'm stuck..

I just can't find the time (or motivation to make the time) to get out there and work on the car. I really want to clean up the engine compartment before I put everything back in but everytime I look at it I feel overwhelmed.

*whew*

Okay, enough of all of that.

The plan is to pull the front clip apart a bit to get it cleaned up, remove the inoperable AC and heater bits (I'll be replacing it with Vintage Air stuff eventually), paint everything, and clean up the wiring harness with some split loom.

Now that I've put it out there, and you've all read it, I HAVE to do it, right? Right..

Stay tuned here for updates, I SWEAR I am gonna get this thing back on the road!

DouglasJRizzo
07-06-11, 09:50 PM
The best motivation is to put some plates and insurance on her and take her for a spin. A few minutes behind the wheel usually brings out the desire to get rolling on the project. Always works for me.

rjgeyer
07-06-11, 10:00 PM
The best motivation is to put some plates and insurance on her and take her for a spin. A few minutes behind the wheel usually brings out the desire to get rolling on the project. Always works for me.

See, that's just the thing. The car is registered and insured (has been since I bought it) but I'm a long way from being able to drive it. Still gotta get the engine and trans IN the car, and get everything working!

I'd be driving it regularly if, you know, it was ASSEMBLED.. ;)

jayoldschool
07-06-11, 10:02 PM
Don't remove your AC and heater stuff. You have everything you need, just get it working. It will work well, and be cheaper in the long run.

77CDV
07-07-11, 03:21 AM
I feel your pain, brother. My 69 FWB has been in the body shop now for going on a year and a half. What started out as fairly straightforward (though extensive) rust repair blossomed into essentially a frame-off. I have not actually driven the car since late April, 2010. There are times when I really want to chuck the whole thing, murder the body guy, or both. But then, I think about how much I enjoyed driving the car over the year or so I was doing the mechanicals and such, and I say, it's OK, it will all work out in time. Patience and persistence. You can't restore a car without both.

That said, I will never restore a car again. Not only is it frustrating, but it's also not cost effective.

rjgeyer
07-07-11, 12:47 PM
I feel your pain, brother. My 69 FWB has been in the body shop now for going on a year and a half. What started out as fairly straightforward (though extensive) rust repair blossomed into essentially a frame-off. I have not actually driven the car since late April, 2010. There are times when I really want to chuck the whole thing, murder the body guy, or both. But then, I think about how much I enjoyed driving the car over the year or so I was doing the mechanicals and such, and I say, it's OK, it will all work out in time. Patience and persistence. You can't restore a car without both.

That said, I will never restore a car again. Not only is it frustrating, but it's also not cost effective.

Thanks man. I actually read through your restoration thread yesterday, looks like it's quite a lot of work, but it should be worth it in the end!

Frankly, I don't mind the time it takes to get the work done, and I also don't mind (terribly) the cost. What bothers me is that I can't find the time to work on it at all, and I like to do the work myself. Makes it quite frustrating.

My youngest kid just turned one year old, and my eldest is nearly four, so I may be able to find some more time soon. Even more likely if I get myself motivated.

The worst part for me was, I bought the car, and drove it a total of about 15mi before the "catastrophic failure". I'm not even sure what it feels like to drive it, but I know I'm going to like it!

CADforce69
07-07-11, 03:31 PM
I have a 69 SDV, that have been stopped now and then since I bought it at end december. I had to make a 280 mile trip that at first was a nightmare because of warped front tires (like I discovered after) and a loose steering; in addition you could hear a slight moaning and then squealing from transmission but when I managed to keep the thing at a speed the wheels did not tremble the experience was haunting -though far from perfect-. I changed tires and everything improved, as in spite of the careless maintenance the car suffered in the past, engine run great (I did 100 miles to visit the mechanic to check the car but no more as he found tie rod ends extremely worn so driving in those conditions could be dangerous). After doing some basic maintenance tasks and changing key parts of steering, brakes and shocks, belts, etc. I really could experience what a cadillac driver feels. I felt like driving in Heaven... Just for 50 miles, as differential had a breakdown. It had practically no lube inside; thats why rack and pinion were worn and made noise. I had to wait 3 months until I got a new differential and had it installed. Last monday I drove it again and itīs difficult finding words to describe how much I enjoyed the 6 miles trip I did, this time with a silent differential in addition of the rest of previous improvements.

My advice is: Start now just by a little step (just start by cleaning a part of the engine compartment). Long journeys always begin by one step, then another and then another one; no matter how small they are. The important thing is that you are walking. When you have started, the project itself will probably possess you and then the problem will be that you will not be able to stop even for just one or two days.

I guarantee you that these cars are worth all the work, efforts and anger they make you pass by. 20 years ago a friendīs father showed me his '67 Oldsmobile 98 and even let me drive it for a while. Since that day I knew someday I would have something like that or better. Now I am achieving my dream at last but as we all grow up we realize that you have to pay a price for dreams so you have to fight for them. At the end itīs worth it.

Thanks for sharing your experience with us and I hope you can soon share new experiences with your caddy.

outsider
07-07-11, 04:47 PM
I'm sure once you get that motor in there you will be more than motivated to keep working on her! Big hurdles like an engine install can slow you down but once you're over them you get a burst of enthusiasm for the project.

CADforce69
07-07-11, 07:25 PM
Another tip: If you have some friend close to your home sharing the same liking for classic cars that wants to help you in your work, that would encourage you a lot to push the process forward.

intragration
07-08-11, 02:50 AM
I agree with the previous poster. When I have a big project sitting out in my garage, I never feel like going out to start on it. But thinking about it, or going out and picking at some aspect that has nothing to do with your end goal is not going to get it done. You have to take a deep breath, and get out there and dig in. Get your hands dirty as quickly as possible, and then once you've started, you'll find it hard to stop. I just finished a complete rotisserie restoration on one car last year, followed by a rolling restoration on another this year. I got a TON of work done, I don't even know how I did it, it didn't take all that long. But it required getting the ball rolling. For me, once I get started, I don't even remember to eat. Go do it!

rjgeyer
07-08-11, 02:14 PM
Hey everyone, thanks for all of the comments and encouragement!

I'm hoping to get out in the garage and grab the passenger fender off of the car so I can start cleaning it up and getting it back together!

I *WILL* get this done! :-)

CADforce69
07-08-11, 03:18 PM
Thatīs a beginning! :) Once you start, plans will get into your head little by little.

Cadillacboy
07-08-11, 06:46 PM
Cool project, looking forward to seeing your progress

rjgeyer
07-11-11, 12:43 AM
Found some pretty serious motivation this weekend, got the front clip blown apart so I can degrease, sand, and paint it.

I also removed the pretty badly rusted exhaust which was in my way, and pulled the transmission crossmember out so I can clean it up and paint it as well.

Stay tuned for a blog post with pictures and more detail. :-D

CADforce69
07-11-11, 12:27 PM
This is promising. Restoration is resumed :)

68 Deville Rag
07-26-11, 06:22 PM
Good luck with the car! If possible, post some pics so we can see how things are coming..